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NEWS
April 29, 1993
It will probably take several months for music lovers to fully realize the Annapolis Brass Quintet has gone out of business. But when Christmas comes without traditional holiday concerts by that masterful ensemble, everyone will surely see the quintet's dissolution as a terrible loss."
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NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | November 11, 2012
Music director Jason Love will not be wielding his baton when the Columbia Orchestra gives a free chamber concert on Saturday, Nov. 17, at 7:30 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church, in Columbia. The nine orchestra members performing in this concert have picked the repertory on their own and also are making their own interpretive decisions about how to play it. Lest you think there has been a palace revolt, Love is all for it. "There are so many great players in the orchestra and sometimes the individuals are lost in the 90-piece orchestra, so it's great to hear them" in smaller ensembles, Love says.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | March 7, 1994
Brass Quintet concerts remind this listener a little too much of high school, of the detested pep rallies he was forced to attend during school hours or the inane half-time rallies at the football games he scrupulously avoided. The brass quintet repertory doesn't help matters. It's what one would expect a brass band (which is exactly what a quintet is) to play, consisting mostly of transcriptions. And, of course, brass players are the jocks of the symphonic world: musicians outgoing enough to like to talk to audiences.
NEWS
February 24, 2008
Friends of the Howard County Library will sponsor a Family Movie Night at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at the Central Library, 10375 Little Patuxent Parkway. A film of the children's classic, Stuart Little, a story about the adventures of an intelligent mouse, will be screened. Refreshments will be provided. Registration is not needed. Information: 410-313-7860. Fugitive Brass Quintet, Flute Cocktail to perform The Oakland Nights Music Series, sponsored by the Town Center Community Association, will present a performance by two instrumental groups -- Flute Cocktail and Fugitive Brass Quintet -- from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. March 7 in the ballroom at Historic Oakland, 5430 Vantage Point Road.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | December 23, 1994
The sound of brass was conspicuous by its absence last Christmas after the disbanding of the Annapolis Brass Quintet in spring 1993.This Christmas, though, brass was back. No, not the ABQ, whose members continue to go their separate ways after about two decades of distinguished music-making.This season it was time for the Bowie Brass Quintet: Carlton Rowe and Robert Birch, trumpets; Diana Ogilvie, French horn; Chris Matten, trombone; and Martin Erickson, tuba. All five are current members or alumnae of Washington' prime military bands and all play like champs.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | March 5, 1991
I often think of the places I'd like to have in music history.Imagine attending services at St. Thomas of Leipzig, with the great Bach himself pounding out on of his own fugues on the chapel organ.Or to have been in the audience as Felix Mendelssohn resurrected Bach's "St. Matthew Passion" at its first Leipzig performance since the composer's death some 80 years earlier.The-premier of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony must have been an unbelievably emotional affair as well. But one musical site I keep returning to over and over in my mind is St. Mark's Cathedral in Venice right around 1600.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | April 16, 1993
Saturday evening in Friedberg Hall will mark an unhappy milestone in the life of brass music in Maryland: It will be the last concert of the Annapolis Brass Quintet.The ABQ has been a fixture here since 1971, when five young brass players who had been members of the U.S. Naval Band in Annapolis decided to make a go of it as a full-time brass quintet in civilian life.Their success is well documented. They made more than 15 records, commissioned about 90 new works, toured Europe once (and sometimes twice)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | April 28, 1993
Twenty two years, thousands of concerts, 16 recordings, 75 world premieres and 17 European tours after its inception, the Annapolis Brass Quintet said farewell to its hometown audience Sunday evening with a final concert.The quintet played before a packed house at Key Auditorium on the campus of St. John's College.The success of such a concert might seem a foregone conclusion to some -- sentiment, adrenalin and all that -- but to a musician, the pressures are immense. If something should go wrong, where and how do you redeem yourself tomorrow?
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | June 9, 1991
Because of inaccurate information provided to The Sun, th time and date for a concert by the Annapolis Brass Quintet at Cross Keys was incorrect in last week's Sunday editions of The )) Sun.The concert is scheduled for June 13 at 7:30 p.m.The Sun regrets the errorSound the trumpets! The 1991 International Brass Quintet Festival kicks off today at 2 p.m. with a 20th anniversary salute to the Annapolis Brass Quintet on the grounds of Nancarles House in Gambrills in Anne Arundel County.Tickets to the concert are $20 and include a catered picnic and commemorative pin. For information about the concert, call (301)
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | December 20, 1992
The Annapolis Brass Quintet has released a new recording, "Reflections in Brass," devoted exclusively to Renaissance and Baroque music. Available in CD or cassette recording, it offers a stylistic range of works from Spain, Germany, England and Italy.Founded in 1971, the Annapolis Brass Quintet has presented both historic and contemporary brass chamber music around the world. "Reflections in Brass" is its 16th commercial recording. To order the recording, call (410) 974-0139.Linking the artsThe National Endowment for the Arts has begun a new grants program for exchanges between United States artists and organizations and their colleagues in Eastern Europe, Central Europe, the former Soviet Union and the Baltics.
NEWS
September 4, 2007
WHAT THEY'RE SAYING A race too close to call Walking the streets in the too-close-to-call race between Michael Sarbanes and Stephanie Rawlings-Blake for City Council president. Maryland baltimoresun.com/marbella Only if the price is right If the Ravens want to bring in Byron Leftwich, recently released by the Jacksonville Jaguars, as the No. 3 quarterback, they should do it only at the right price. Sports baltimoresun.com/preston other voices Tim Smith on the Kronos Quartet Today Eileen Ambrose on U.S. savings rate Business 5 THINGS TO DO TODAY Ottobar moviesSpice up the evening with a couple of awesomely cheesy flicks at the Ottobar: Mysterious Monsters is a 1970s documentary about strange creatures such as Bigfoot, and Troll 2 is a horror flick from 1990 about man-eating beasts.
FEATURES
June 19, 2007
Kids Concert Brass quintet performs Take the kids to see the U.S. Air Force's Heritage Brass Quintet perform in "Bravo for Brass," a performance adapted for children. The 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. shows feature tunes about baseball, summertime and more. The free event will take place at Carroll Arts Center, 91 W. Main St., Westminster. To reserve a ticket, call 410-848-7272.
NEWS
May 20, 2007
Lyric brass -- Sundays At Three, a locally sponsored chamber music series, will present A Musical Potpourri for Brass, performed by The Lyric Brass Quintet (above), winner of the 2000 Baltimore Chamber Music Competition, at 3 p.m. today at Christ Episcopal Church, 6800 Oakland Mills Road, Columbia. On the program are works by J.S. Bach, Victor Ewald, Michael Praetorius and others. Tickets are $15; $10 for unaccompanied full-time students. Anyone younger than 18 is admitted free when accompanied by an adult.
NEWS
By Eileen Soskin and Eileen Soskin,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
Live music. Alive music. Live audiences. Come one, come all. But why should you? Why should you leave the comfort of your easy chair and venture out to a concert? Our compact-disc players and television systems provide us with sophisticated sound systems that deliver wonderful musical experiences with the flick of a finger. Yet the most intense musical experiences come about only when we are present, not virtually present. Nothing, absolutely nothing, is like live music. On a CD, the sound is so clear that you can hear the performers breathe; on television, the camera can zoom in so that you can watch the performers breathe; but when you are there, you are in control: you choose what to look at; you choose what to hear; you choose what to focus on. A concert is an intimate experience even if you are sitting in an auditorium with hundreds of other people.
NEWS
May 16, 2003
Community music group to perform spring concert The Encore Community Music Association will present its spring concert at 3 p.m. Sunday in the auditorium of North Carroll High School. The program will include band, string orchestra and chamber ensemble performances. Music from classics to pops will be performed by an intergenerational group that includes performers ages 8 to 80. The concert is free. A reception with refreshments will be held after the concert. The school is at 1400 Panther Drive, Hampstead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Sun Staff | December 16, 2001
When Doug Genne started using an Internet service for singles, he didn't expect it to change his life. "I was not looking for my future wife," says Doug, but, that's who he found on www.matchmaker.com. Constance Thomas was hours away from finishing her trial membership in 1999 and ending her visits to the Web site when Doug sent her "an amazing e-mail" using humorous words like "golly" and "gee-willikers." "I just thought it was really cute," says Constance. Doug, who grew up in Plainsboro, N.J., had been living in the Washington area for more than four years and was discouraged by the dating scene.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield Contributing Writer | April 23, 1993
After 22 years of distinguished music making, the Annapolis Brass Quintet will take the stage for the final time this weekend.When trumpeters David Cran and Robert Suggs, French horn player Sharon Tiebert and trombonists Wayne Wells and Robert Posten appear in concert at Key Auditorium Sunday evening, they will bring the curtain down on a pioneering ensemble that has brought the excitement of brass chamber music alive to audiences all over the world."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 17, 2001
From a string quartet to a deftly assembled theatrical cast to an elegantly danced pas de deux from a great ballet, many of the most incandescent moments the performing arts have to offer are collaborative affairs. It is to the spirit of collaboration that Kinetics Dance Theatre, the innovative modern dance ensemble based in Ellicott City, will tip its cap Saturday evening when it presents "Connecting: A Modern Dance Concert of Collaborations" at the Baltimore Museum of Art. The performance will begin at 7:30 p.m. Priscilla B. Kaufhold, Kinetics Dance company director since 1998, has brought together dancers and choreographers from North Carolina and Pennsylvania, Baltimore's Lexington Brass Quintet, guitarist Shawn Heming and painter Mary Jo Tydlacka for this multimedia celebration of the performing arts.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 21, 2000
The ghosts of Christmases Past were out in force when the Annapolis Brass Quintet took center stage for an evening of holiday music Sunday at historic St. Anne's Episcopal Church. The quintet had not played together as Annapolis' "official" representative to the world of brass chamber music since April 1993. It was a delight to hear the ensemble at work again, paying tribute to Christmas, to the past lives of its members and to the spirit of Charlie Byrd, the master guitarist and quintet colleague who died last year.
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