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NEWS
July 10, 2002
The student: Andy Davis, 15 School: River Hill High Special achievement: Andy earned a spot as a trombone player in the All-State Band. Students vying for the positions are given one piece of music to learn before auditions and another once there to sight-read. "You have an hour to practice and prepare," he said. He is also a Boy Scout and has completed his Eagle project. Why trombone? "I started playing trombone in fourth grade. I like the way it sounds. I think it has a nice tone quality.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2010
Nelson William Knode, a trumpeter who led a swing orchestra and was known as the music man of Catonsville, died of respiratory failure Tuesday at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 88 and lived in Relay. Born in Baltimore and raised on Fulton Avenue, he credited his parents with getting him into a life of music. "I'll tell you what kind of people they were," he said in a 1982 Sun article. "My dad was laid off by the B&O Railroad when I was 8 or 9 years old. It was right around Christmastime, and we didn't have two pennies to rub together.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | June 16, 2007
Walter A. Lawson, a nationally recognized French horn maker and a former Baltimore Symphony Orchestra musician, died Wednesday of heart disease at Reeders Memorial Home in Boonsboro. The former Catonsville resident was 84. Born in Binghamton, N.Y., Mr. Lawson studied piano and horn as a youngster. During World War II, he worked for the Associated Press as a teletype mechanic and served in the Army Signal Corps. He was stationed on Okinawa when the war ended. Using his veterans benefits, he moved to Baltimore in 1947 and enrolled at the Peabody Conservatory.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | June 16, 2007
Walter A. Lawson, a nationally recognized French horn maker and a former Baltimore Symphony Orchestra musician, died Wednesday of heart disease at Reeders Memorial Home in Boonsboro. The former Catonsville resident was 84. Born in Binghamton, N.Y., Mr. Lawson studied piano and horn as a youngster. During World War II, he worked for the Associated Press as a teletype mechanic and served in the Army Signal Corps. He was stationed on Okinawa when the war ended. Using his veterans benefits, he moved to Baltimore in 1947 and enrolled at the Peabody Conservatory.
NEWS
By Eileen Soskin and Eileen Soskin,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
Live music. Alive music. Live audiences. Come one, come all. But why should you? Why should you leave the comfort of your easy chair and venture out to a concert? Our compact-disc players and television systems provide us with sophisticated sound systems that deliver wonderful musical experiences with the flick of a finger. Yet the most intense musical experiences come about only when we are present, not virtually present. Nothing, absolutely nothing, is like live music. On a CD, the sound is so clear that you can hear the performers breathe; on television, the camera can zoom in so that you can watch the performers breathe; but when you are there, you are in control: you choose what to look at; you choose what to hear; you choose what to focus on. A concert is an intimate experience even if you are sitting in an auditorium with hundreds of other people.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2004
By day, Goucher College physics professor Dave Baum studies ways to identify anthrax spores using ultraviolet light. In his free time, he indulges his enthusiasm for early brass music. Want to guess which endeavor is potentially more harmful to his health? The early brass, he says. Baum, 44, is at the center of a small but fervent circle of classical music lovers who are devoted to playing early brass instruments - trumpets, cornets and sackbuts (the precursor of the trombone) like those used in the 17th and 18th centuries.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2010
Nelson William Knode, a trumpeter who led a swing orchestra and was known as the music man of Catonsville, died of respiratory failure Tuesday at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 88 and lived in Relay. Born in Baltimore and raised on Fulton Avenue, he credited his parents with getting him into a life of music. "I'll tell you what kind of people they were," he said in a 1982 Sun article. "My dad was laid off by the B&O Railroad when I was 8 or 9 years old. It was right around Christmastime, and we didn't have two pennies to rub together.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ANNA EISENBERG | December 8, 2005
OUTSIDE Eastport Yacht Club Light Parade More than 50 boats will line the Annapolis waterfront Saturday. Each skipper will illuminate his or her craft with a theme for the public to enjoy. Prior entries have included Finding Nemo, Spongebob's Key West Christmas and Frosty the Snowman. Spectators line the waterfront to watch the glowing parade - the event has attracted crowds of 20,000 to 30,000 people in the past. The parade is Saturday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. One fleet circles in front of Eastport Yacht Club, the City Dock and the Naval Academy seawall and the other fleet circles the length of Spa Creek, inside the bridge.
BUSINESS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 18, 1996
The U.S. Small Business Administration's top Maryland award winner yesterday urged his fellow entrepreneurs to pull together with their employees to create "heaven on earth" in the workplace.Rafael Correa, president of MaTech Inc. in Hebron, warned against selfishness in a brief statement he made after receiving the SBA's Maryland Small Business Person of the Year award.In his remarks, he told a short story that said the difference between heaven and hell is greed. He said employers and their workers all benefit by working unselfishly with each other and with governmental agencies.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2004
They peered from their hotel rooms, from the deck of the Constellation and from balconies up and down the Harborplace complex, people drawn to the sight - and sound - of more than 200 tubas and other brass instruments in one place. "It's fun and a little funny," said Mike Sohng, 25, who was warming up his baritone tuba just minutes before the start of the annual Merry Tuba Christmas concert yesterday outside the Light Street Pavilion. He said the curious onlookers "get something kind of strange.
NEWS
By Eileen Soskin and Eileen Soskin,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
Live music. Alive music. Live audiences. Come one, come all. But why should you? Why should you leave the comfort of your easy chair and venture out to a concert? Our compact-disc players and television systems provide us with sophisticated sound systems that deliver wonderful musical experiences with the flick of a finger. Yet the most intense musical experiences come about only when we are present, not virtually present. Nothing, absolutely nothing, is like live music. On a CD, the sound is so clear that you can hear the performers breathe; on television, the camera can zoom in so that you can watch the performers breathe; but when you are there, you are in control: you choose what to look at; you choose what to hear; you choose what to focus on. A concert is an intimate experience even if you are sitting in an auditorium with hundreds of other people.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2004
By day, Goucher College physics professor Dave Baum studies ways to identify anthrax spores using ultraviolet light. In his free time, he indulges his enthusiasm for early brass music. Want to guess which endeavor is potentially more harmful to his health? The early brass, he says. Baum, 44, is at the center of a small but fervent circle of classical music lovers who are devoted to playing early brass instruments - trumpets, cornets and sackbuts (the precursor of the trombone) like those used in the 17th and 18th centuries.
NEWS
July 10, 2002
The student: Andy Davis, 15 School: River Hill High Special achievement: Andy earned a spot as a trombone player in the All-State Band. Students vying for the positions are given one piece of music to learn before auditions and another once there to sight-read. "You have an hour to practice and prepare," he said. He is also a Boy Scout and has completed his Eagle project. Why trombone? "I started playing trombone in fourth grade. I like the way it sounds. I think it has a nice tone quality.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | December 24, 2009
They gathered Wednesday night in Fells Point with accordions, drums, brass instruments and lively caroling voices, marching as many have for nearly four decades in this once-vibrant Polish community and making joyful noises. They call the event East Baltimore Christmas, a night of caroling and celebrating the city's rich Polish heritage. Since its inception in 1971, it has grown into a Polish homecoming and a local holiday staple. Wednesday night's event drew hundreds who sang everything from traditional Polish songs to "Jingle Bells."
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