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Brass Elephant

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BUSINESS
March 30, 2010
The investment group that signed a contract a month ago to buy the Brass Elephant did not come up with the necessary deposit by Monday's deadline, a real estate broker involved in the deal said. "We have not gotten a deposit," said Kemp Byrnes, a broker representing the seller. "That's all I can tell you." But Byrnes said the deal is not dead. He said there is still "a conversation that's going on between the seller and buyer." The Brass Elephant building, at 924 N. Charles St. in Mount Vernon, has been vacant since the storied fine-dining establishment closed in August.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
Citing numerous accounts of neighborhood disturbances, the Baltimore Board of Liquor License Commissioners ruled not to renew the license of the Museum Restaurant and Lounge in Mount Vernon after four hours of deliberation Thursday night. Liquor board chairman Steve Fogleman said management of the Museum - which set up in the former Brass Elephant space - presented the business as an “upscale restaurant” when applying for the license, but it was in reality a nightclub. He refuted Museum owner Walter Webb's claims from earlier this month that Webb had been unfairly targeted because he is one of the few African American business owners in Mount Vernon.
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BUSINESS
July 14, 2010
The Baltimore building formerly occupied by The Brass Elephant restaurant is scheduled to be sold at a public auction on the premises, 924 N. Charles St., at 2 p.m. on Aug. 3. Alex Cooper Auctioneers is handling the sale, which is a mortgage foreclosure sale on behalf of PNC Bank. The restaurant closed in August 2009 after nearly 30 years of operation. According to Alex Cooper's website, the sale involves the real estate only, not the former restaurant's furniture, fixtures, equipment or liquor license.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | April 2, 2013
A neighborhood organization is protesting the liquor-license renewal of The Museum, the establishment now occupying what was once the Brass Elephant in Mount Vernon . According to Baltimore City Liquor License Board documents, the Mount Vernon Belvedere Improvement Association is asking the board not to renew the property's Class B restaurant license for the following reasons: 1) licensees leasing their license or otherwise permitting a non-licensee, Walter Webb, to operate an establishment primarily promoting and serving alcoholic beverages; 2)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
The dormant liquor license has been reactivated at 924 North Charles Street, the former home of the Brass Elephant. The approval came at Thursday's meeting of the Baltimore City Liquor License Board. Within a few weeks, the property will reopen as The Museum, according to the board's president Stephan Fogelman. Faced with opposition from neighborhood groups, attempts to reactivate the license stalled in February, when Charles Street Restaurant, Inc., the holding company that operated the Brass Elephant, asked the liquor board for a postponement.  On the eve of the February hearing, however, the association sent its members an email listing concerns about the plans for the property, particularly the inclusion of live entertainment.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2010
Potential buyers for the Brass Elephant, who failed to come up with a deposit Monday, still want to go ahead with the deal, an owner of the shuttered Mount Vernon restaurant said Tuesday. Randy Stahl and the other owners closed the fine-dining establishment in August and put the building that housed it up for sale. An investment group planning to put a restaurant in the location signed a contract on the building a month ago and had until Monday to put down a deposit. The money never came.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2012
Faced with opposition from neighborhood groups, plans to reopen the Brass Elephant have stalled. The restaurant's owners asked the city's liquor board on Thursday for time to regroup amid concerns that the cherished fine-dining restaurant would be converted into a nightclub. "We would like to have legal representation," said Stuart Teper, a representative of Charles Street Restaurant, Inc., the Brass Elephant's holding company. The owners had been seeking to reactivate the Brass Elephant's liquor license but instead asked for a postponement, which the Board of Liquor License Commissioners granted.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2010
The building that once housed the Brass Elephant restaurant is expected to have a buyer by noon Monday. The Mount Vernon building, at 924 N. Charles St., has been vacant since the landmark fine-dining spot closed in August. A group of potential buyers signed a contract a month ago and have until midday Monday to put up money needed for the sale to go forward, Randy Stahl, part-owner of the Brass Elephant, said Friday. The buyers have indicated that they intend to move ahead with the deal, said Stahl, who was the restaurant's chef from 1980 to 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | January 19, 2012
We told you on Jan. 13 about some interesting activity at 924 N. Charles. Not much had stirred inside the Mount Vernon town house since the Brass Elephant closed down in 2009, but just after the new year, neighbors noticed that someone had papered over the front windows. Workers were seen entering and exiting the property, too, causing Mount Vernon residents and business owners, who are inquisitive by nature, to wonder if 924 had at last been sold. Not yet it hasn't. On Wednesday, the Daily Record reported that it's the real estate agent handling 924 who's fixing up the property.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | April 2, 2013
A neighborhood organization is protesting the liquor-license renewal of The Museum, the establishment now occupying what was once the Brass Elephant in Mount Vernon . According to Baltimore City Liquor License Board documents, the Mount Vernon Belvedere Improvement Association is asking the board not to renew the property's Class B restaurant license for the following reasons: 1) licensees leasing their license or otherwise permitting a non-licensee, Walter Webb, to operate an establishment primarily promoting and serving alcoholic beverages; 2)
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case | August 29, 2012
Filling the shoes of the former Brass Elephant, which closed in August 2009, is like slipping into an $800 pair of Christian Louboutins. Located in the heart of Mount Vernon, the building is so elegant and beautiful that it immediately demands to be taken seriously. Unfortunately for Museum, the new restaurant and lounge that held its grand opening in June, that type of scrutiny did not exactly help its case on a recent Friday night. It's a shame because the night was filled with dancing to a solid DJ. But there was no mistaking the red flags.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
The Brass Elephant could soon be reopening. Well, not the Brass Elephant exactly. A restaurant named The Museum is set to open within weeks at 924 N. Charles St., the elegant Mount Vernon townhouse that the Brass Elephant called home for almost 30 years before closing in August 2009. The multistory restaurant property remains in the hands of Charles Street Restaurant Inc., which has entered into an operating agreement with Walter Webb, according to longtime owner Stuart Teper. Webb could not be reached for comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
The dormant liquor license has been reactivated at 924 North Charles Street, the former home of the Brass Elephant. The approval came at Thursday's meeting of the Baltimore City Liquor License Board. Within a few weeks, the property will reopen as The Museum, according to the board's president Stephan Fogelman. Faced with opposition from neighborhood groups, attempts to reactivate the license stalled in February, when Charles Street Restaurant, Inc., the holding company that operated the Brass Elephant, asked the liquor board for a postponement.  On the eve of the February hearing, however, the association sent its members an email listing concerns about the plans for the property, particularly the inclusion of live entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2012
Faced with opposition from neighborhood groups, plans to reopen the Brass Elephant have stalled. The restaurant's owners asked the city's liquor board on Thursday for time to regroup amid concerns that the cherished fine-dining restaurant would be converted into a nightclub. "We would like to have legal representation," said Stuart Teper, a representative of Charles Street Restaurant, Inc., the Brass Elephant's holding company. The owners had been seeking to reactivate the Brass Elephant's liquor license but instead asked for a postponement, which the Board of Liquor License Commissioners granted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | January 19, 2012
We told you on Jan. 13 about some interesting activity at 924 N. Charles. Not much had stirred inside the Mount Vernon town house since the Brass Elephant closed down in 2009, but just after the new year, neighbors noticed that someone had papered over the front windows. Workers were seen entering and exiting the property, too, causing Mount Vernon residents and business owners, who are inquisitive by nature, to wonder if 924 had at last been sold. Not yet it hasn't. On Wednesday, the Daily Record reported that it's the real estate agent handling 924 who's fixing up the property.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2011
Sunday's review is of Indigma, which was one of the casualties of December's Park Plaza fire. The move across the street to 802 N. Charles St.  is meant to be a temporary solution, but Tony Chemmanoor has fixed the place up real nice. My Thai, by the way, which was also lost in the fire, almost landed in similar fashion at the Brass Elephant, but the deal didn't go through. For the record, Chemmanoor formerly owned another restaurant, Bombay Grill, in the same building at 802, but that was on the lower level.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | March 22, 1991
The Brass ElephantWhere: 924 N. Charles St.Hours: Second-floor bar open 5 p.m.-11 p.m. Mondays to Fridays, 5:30 p.m.-11 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, although it often is open as late as 1:30 a.m. on weekends.Credit cards: All major cards accepted.Call: 547-8480. Although the Brass Elephant is a dress-up, reservations-advised restaurant featuring northern Italian cuisine, its equally elegant upstairs bar has a much more casual attitude."People often walk by the restaurant thinking they're not dressed properly to come in, but there is no dress code for the upstairs bar," says manager Andy Noppenberger.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | January 16, 1992
The Brass Elephant is a charming, genteel restaurant with shimmering chandeliers, flickering candles and shining brass. Someone who knows nothing of The Brass Elephant but its name might expect less civility.The Brass Elephant, housed in an elegant Charles Street row house, enjoys a widespread reputation as one of Baltimore's best special-occasion restaurants.Indeed, it is special -- pretty and comfortably formal without being stuffy. Service and food are generally good, occasionally excellent.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2010
The Baltimore building formerly occupied by The Brass Elephant restaurant is scheduled to be sold at a public auction on the premises, 924 N. Charles St., at 2 p.m. on Aug. 3. Alex Cooper Auctioneers is handling the sale, which is a mortgage foreclosure sale on behalf of PNC Bank. The restaurant closed in August 2009 after nearly 30 years of operation. According to Alex Cooper's website, the sale involves the real estate only, not the former restaurant's furniture, fixtures, equipment or liquor license.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2010
Potential buyers for the Brass Elephant, who failed to come up with a deposit Monday, still want to go ahead with the deal, an owner of the shuttered Mount Vernon restaurant said Tuesday. Randy Stahl and the other owners closed the fine-dining establishment in August and put the building that housed it up for sale. An investment group planning to put a restaurant in the location signed a contract on the building a month ago and had until Monday to put down a deposit. The money never came.
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