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Brandon Tartikoff

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By Knight-Ridder | January 3, 1991
Brandon Tartikoff, who led NBC to five consecutive winning seasons in the prime-time ratings, has been seriously hurt in a car crash that also injured his daughter, a network spokeswoman said yesterday.Tartikoff, 41, chairman of the NBC Entertainment Group, and his daughter, Calla, 8, were injured late Tuesday near Lake Tahoe, Nev. They were rushed to Washoe Medical Center in Reno, Nev., where both were placed in intensive care.Yesterday afternoon, Tartikoff's condition was upgraded from serious to satisfactory and he was moved to the orthopedic recovery unit, says NBC spokeswoman Susan Binford.
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By Don Aucoin and Don Aucoin,BOSTON GLOBE | October 26, 1997
Erstwhile TV Wunderkind Brandon Tartikoff did not go gentle into that good night, but rather raged, raged against the dying -- or at least the creeping mediocrity -- of the medium he once dominated.The former NBC programming wizard who gave us "Cheers," "Hill Street Blues" and "St. Elsewhere" -- epitaph enough for anyone -- stayed tuned to the TV industry in the months before he succumbed to cancer in August at age 48. Tartikoff was not much impressed by what he saw, and he passed on his opinions to his friend Nikki Finke, who passes them on to us in the November Esquire.
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By Michael Hill | January 8, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Brandon Tartikoff is not at this meeting of the television critics with the NBC stars and executives for the first time in something like a dozen years.But his presence still hovers over the gathering -- mainly because of genuine concern about his health. Tartikoff is in a Reno, Nev., hospital recovering from serious injuries received from an automobile accident last week.While his condition continues to improve, the status of his 8-year-old daughter, Calla, who received a head injury, remains serious.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 28, 1997
Brandon Tartikoff, the youngest and most successful head programmer in television history, died yesterday at the age of 48 at UCLA Medical Center, where he was being treated for cancer.Tartikoff, who was Entertainment President at NBC from 1980 to 1991, joined the network at the age of 30, when it was in last place, and left it a prime-time powerhouse thanks to hits he developed, including "The Cosby Show," "Miami Vice," "Family Ties" and "Cheers."While Tartikoff was proud of his records for being the youngest and the most successful network programmer, he said that he expected they would soon be eclipsed.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 28, 1997
Brandon Tartikoff, the youngest and most successful head programmer in television history, died yesterday at the age of 48 at UCLA Medical Center, where he was being treated for cancer.Tartikoff, who was Entertainment President at NBC from 1980 to 1991, joined the network at the age of 30, when it was in last place, and left it a prime-time powerhouse thanks to hits he developed, including "The Cosby Show," "Miami Vice," "Family Ties" and "Cheers."While Tartikoff was proud of his records for being the youngest and the most successful network programmer, he said that he expected they would soon be eclipsed.
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By Don Aucoin and Don Aucoin,BOSTON GLOBE | October 26, 1997
Erstwhile TV Wunderkind Brandon Tartikoff did not go gentle into that good night, but rather raged, raged against the dying -- or at least the creeping mediocrity -- of the medium he once dominated.The former NBC programming wizard who gave us "Cheers," "Hill Street Blues" and "St. Elsewhere" -- epitaph enough for anyone -- stayed tuned to the TV industry in the months before he succumbed to cancer in August at age 48. Tartikoff was not much impressed by what he saw, and he passed on his opinions to his friend Nikki Finke, who passes them on to us in the November Esquire.
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By Bernard Weinraub and Bernard Weinraub,Evening Sun Staff | October 31, 1991
LOS ANGELES - Brandon Tartikoff, chairman of Paramount Pictures Corp., said Wednesday that the dismal financial showing of the studio's latest releases, "Frankie and Johnny" and "The Butcher's Wife," has led to a fundamental reassessment of the kinds of the films he will make as he solidifies control of one of Hollywood's most powerful studios.Instead of movies intended for an older audience, Tartikoff said he planned to make films that appeal to younger audiences, who comprise the bulk of moviegoers today.
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By Los Angeles Daily News | October 21, 1993
Brandon Tartikoff, former network TV programmer and movie mogul, is greatly disturbed by what he perceives to be a burgeoning new era of censorship on America's television airwaves.Between all of the new projects stemming from his current incarnation as a TV megaproducer, Mr. Tartikoff -- the former president of NBC Entertainment and head of Paramount Pictures -- has been railing against the government's sudden preoccupation with TV violence.It smacks of self-serving hypocrisy to Mr. Tartikoff.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 3, 1998
It's Thursday night on the seventh floor of Hagerstown Hall dorm, and there's a party going on.Well, sort of a party.In the lounge, there are three giant bags of potato chips, two huge platters of chocolate chip cookies and a couple of cases of soft drinks. There are also 15 or so University of Maryland, College Park students in cutoffs, sweats, jeans and gym shorts eating, drinking and waiting for the start of "Seinfeld."Other dormies wander in and out. One woman dries her hair in preparation for a date that she says "will probably be totally Elainesque"; one guy slides in the door like Cosmo Kramer.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 8, 1991
Los Angeles - The hard economic times many Americans are facing have started to affect the television shows they'll be seeing this spring.Producers and stars here are saying that because of the recession, the fictional lives of television characters are being scaled down and stripped of glitz, while more made-for-TV movies about past and present economic crises are being scheduled."
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By Los Angeles Daily News | October 21, 1993
Brandon Tartikoff, former network TV programmer and movie mogul, is greatly disturbed by what he perceives to be a burgeoning new era of censorship on America's television airwaves.Between all of the new projects stemming from his current incarnation as a TV megaproducer, Mr. Tartikoff -- the former president of NBC Entertainment and head of Paramount Pictures -- has been railing against the government's sudden preoccupation with TV violence.It smacks of self-serving hypocrisy to Mr. Tartikoff.
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By Bernard Weinraub and Bernard Weinraub,Evening Sun Staff | October 31, 1991
LOS ANGELES - Brandon Tartikoff, chairman of Paramount Pictures Corp., said Wednesday that the dismal financial showing of the studio's latest releases, "Frankie and Johnny" and "The Butcher's Wife," has led to a fundamental reassessment of the kinds of the films he will make as he solidifies control of one of Hollywood's most powerful studios.Instead of movies intended for an older audience, Tartikoff said he planned to make films that appeal to younger audiences, who comprise the bulk of moviegoers today.
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By Michael Hill | January 8, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Brandon Tartikoff is not at this meeting of the television critics with the NBC stars and executives for the first time in something like a dozen years.But his presence still hovers over the gathering -- mainly because of genuine concern about his health. Tartikoff is in a Reno, Nev., hospital recovering from serious injuries received from an automobile accident last week.While his condition continues to improve, the status of his 8-year-old daughter, Calla, who received a head injury, remains serious.
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By Knight-Ridder | January 3, 1991
Brandon Tartikoff, who led NBC to five consecutive winning seasons in the prime-time ratings, has been seriously hurt in a car crash that also injured his daughter, a network spokeswoman said yesterday.Tartikoff, 41, chairman of the NBC Entertainment Group, and his daughter, Calla, 8, were injured late Tuesday near Lake Tahoe, Nev. They were rushed to Washoe Medical Center in Reno, Nev., where both were placed in intensive care.Yesterday afternoon, Tartikoff's condition was upgraded from serious to satisfactory and he was moved to the orthopedic recovery unit, says NBC spokeswoman Susan Binford.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 13, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- Brandon Tartikoff is definitely back.The former NBC programming whiz became the chairman of New World Entertainment in June, and he seems to be all over the place here promoting his productions. Yesterday, he announced the debut of "Q&E!" -- a program that he says will feature "celebrities in a fast-paced, round-robin, question-and-answer format."The show, which sounds like the game show presented as entertainment, will debut Aug. 22 on the E! Entertainment Television cable channel.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | October 21, 1993
All through the World Series, the rest of television has played dead, offering few real incentives to change the channel -- other than Tuesday's "NYPD Blue," that is. Tonight the tide turns in a big way, as NBC, Fox and TNT conspire to offer entertaining alternatives. Still, as that famous baseball fan William Shakespeare once wrote, the double play's the thing.* "World Series Game 5" (8 p.m.-conclusion, WBAL, Channel 11) -- Look at it this way: No matter what happens tonight, this is the last World Series game to be played in the United States in 1993.
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