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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 30, 2003
A Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. employee was badly burned yesterday afternoon when he fell into a vat containing 12 feet of hot ash at the Brandon Shores Power Plant in northern Anne Arundel County, authorities said. Michael Crawford of the 600 block of Wise Ave. in Pasadena was in stable condition last night at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, where he was being treated for second- and third-degree burns on both arms, legs and his back. At about 1:45 p.m. yesterday, Crawford, 40, and another employee were pushing hot ash, the leftovers of burning coal to make electricity, into a deep metal vat, a BGE spokesman explained.
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NEWS
October 7, 2014
It is time to plug the loopholes for coal-fired power plants in Maryland ( "New coal plant pollution controls eyed," Sept. 13). A report by the Maryland Department of the Environment found that many of the coal fired power plants in Maryland had not used their pollution controls continuously. If the Brandon Shores and Wagner plants had used their controls continuously in 2012, they could have cut nitrous oxide emissions by 2,000 tons. So what's the problem with nitrous oxide?
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | June 5, 1991
It may not be easy to love the local electric company, but when temperatures stuck in the 90s last week, Marylanders were relieved to hear their fans and air conditioners humming.And a big reason they were humming, despite the record-breaking demand for power, was the fortuitous start-up May 28 -- in mid-heat wave -- of the $662 million Brandon Shores 2 generating station.The 642-megawatt, coal-burning giant on the south shore of the Patapsco River, 10 miles southeast of downtown Baltimore, is the Baltimore Gas & Electric Co.'s cleanest and most-advanced conventional generator.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
Charles W. Thomas Jr., former owner of several steel fabrication companies and a Korean War veteran, died Saturday from renal failure at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime Mays Chapel resident was 85. The son of Charles W. Thomas Sr., owner of Acme Steel Engineering Co., and Mary J. Thomas, a homemaker, Charles Wesley Thomas Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. After graduating in 1947 from the McDonogh School, Mr. Thomas followed his father into the steel fabrication business.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2000
In its continuing collaboration with Solley-area residents, Constellation Power Source Generation has agreed to use a 30-percent-ammonia liquid that will be trucked through the neighborhood to the Brandon Shores power plant, where it will be used to reduce emissions. The company decided to transport aqueous ammonia in three to five trucks every day, each carrying 5,800 gallons, after meeting with a community group Monday night and figuring in additional concerns from other meetings and discussions with residents.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1998
The news yesterday that the Brandon Shores power plant has been listed as one of the dirtiest in the nation came as no surprise to Anne Arundel County residents living within sight of its smokestacks."
BUSINESS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | May 23, 1991
Your electric bills will be going up again next Tuesday so that the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. can pay for a new coal-fired generating station in Anne Arundel County.BG&E spokesman John A. Metzger said yesterday the "typical" residential consumer, who uses 600 kilowatt hours of electricity per month, will see his average monthly bill rise $2.98, or 5.5 percent, to $56.93.Half of BG&E's residential customers use more than that each month; half use less.The increase follows action by the Maryland Public Service Commission yesterday granting BG&E a $123.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | June 5, 1991
Billed as the cleanest and most economical of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s power plants, Brandon Shore's new 642-megawatt electric generator is anything but quiet.The rumbling hum of the massive General Electric turbine -- powered by 250 tons of coal an hour -- easily penetrates the foam rubber earplugs BG&E officials require guests to wear.Yesterday, the utility opened the doors of Brandon Shores Unit II, which it switched on May 28, to reporters and photographers.Theturbine deck is spotless and the containment room is cool, especially considering that the steam which drives the turbine reaches 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit.
NEWS
July 15, 1998
BALTIMORE Gas and Electric Co.'s battle to open a third disposal site for the fly ash from its coal-fired plant at Brandon Shores has reached a critical stage.Circuit Court Judge Ronald A. Silkworth will decide in several weeks if the county's Board of Appeals made the right call in requiring the utility to construct a clay liner before it begins filling the last section of its nearby business park.During the past 16 years, BGE has dumped several million tons of fly ash produced by its massive Brandon Shores power plant (( in northern Anne Arundel's Solley area in two adjacent sites.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2000
Siding with worried Solley residents, the County Council passed a resolution last night urging the operator of the Brandon Shores power plant to scrap plans to haul a hazardous material through the neighborhood. The vote was 5-1, with Councilman Bill D. Burlison voting no because of the issue's technical nature. Councilwoman Pamela G. Beidle abstained, citing an unspecified potential conflict of interest. The action cannot force the company to do anything. Councilwoman Shirley Murphy, the resolution's sponsor, hopes to put pressure on Constellation Power Source, which operates the plant formerly owned by its sister company, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. The move cheered Solley residents who object to Constellation's plan to use anhydrous ammonia - a common industrial chemical that can cause severe lung damage and death in cases of extreme exposure - in a system designed to reduce pollution at the coal-fired Brandon Shores plant.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
Exelon Corp. plans to sell its three Maryland coal-fired power plants for $400 million to a subsidiary of private equity firm Riverstone Holdings LLC, the Chicago-based energy giant said Thursday. Under the terms of the deal, buyer Raven Power Holdings LLC will maintain employment levels and offer pay and benefits comparable to those now received by the plants' 420 workers for at least two years. Exelon was required by the U.S. Department of Justice, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and the Maryland Public Service Commission to sell the three facilities — the Brandon Shores and H.A. Wagner plants in Anne Arundel County and the C.P. Crane plant in Baltimore County — by the end of the year as a condition of its $7.9 billion purchase of Baltimore-based Constellation Energy Group in March.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
While Constellation Energy Group has a new owner in Exelon Corp., 450 workers at three coal-fired plants once owned by the Baltimore company are in limbo. As a condition of its purchase of Constellation last month, the Chicago energy giant has committed to selling the Brandon Shores and H.A. Wagner plants in Anne Arundel County and the C.P. Crane plant in Baltimore County by the end of the year. The sale is not expected to be easy, because the economic prospects for coal plants have dimmed, given falling natural gas prices and stricter air-quality regulations due to come online over the next few years, analysts said.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2011
Constellation Energy Group's plans to sell itself to Exelon Corp. cleared a regulatory hurdle Wednesday after the two companies reached a proposed settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice. The settlement, which requires court approval, calls for the companies to sell three coal plants in Maryland to alleviate market concentration in the mid-Atlantic electricity grid. Exelon and Constellation already announced plans to divest the Brandon Shores and H.A. Wagner plants in Anne Arundel County and the C.P. Crane plant in Baltimore County.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2011
Constellation Energy Group and Exelon Corp. have agreed to additional concessions to alleviate concerns over market power in the mid-Atlantic's electricity grid under the companies' plan to merge, according to documents filed Tuesday with federal and state energy regulators. The settlement satisfies only the concerns raised by the independent market monitor for the PJM market, which initially found that the union between the two companies "would significantly increase concentration" of generator ownership and potentially give the companies the ability to drive up electricity prices.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | February 20, 2010
A new smokestack is not usually cause for celebration among environmentalists. But the 400-foot stack spouting white clouds at Brandon Shores power plant represents a quantum leap in cleaning Baltimore's air, not another source of pollution. Constellation Energy has just completed work on $875 million worth of pollution "scrubbers" at its 26-year-old coal-fired power plant on the Patapsco River. One of the plant's two steam-generating units resumed operation with the new air-quality controls in December, and the second is cranking up now. The white clouds rising from the stack are almost entirely water vapor.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 14, 2009
J ohn L. Edler, a retired utility company executive whose career with Baltimore Gas and Electric and later Constellation Energy spanned four decades, died of a cardiac arrest Nov. 4 at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center. He was 70 and lived in Bel Air. Mr. Edler, the son of an Esskay worker and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Canton. The day after graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1957, Mr. Edler began his BGE career, working as a draftsman.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2000
Once again, residents in northern Anne Arundel County are gearing up to fight the big power company next door. Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s plans to truck a common but hazardous chemical down a road where traffic accidents are frequent has raised community outrage - though the anhydrous ammonia is destined for a new pollution-control system at the coal-fueled Brandon Shores plant. Community leaders have collected nearly 1,000 signatures against the plan since a neighborhood meeting Tuesday, when most residents learned about BGE's 1998 decision to truck about 7,000 gallons of a pressurized form of the gas into the complex daily as part of a new emission-reduction system.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2000
In a letter to neighbors of its northeastern Anne Arundel County power plants, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. said yesterday it will move forward with installation of pollution-control equipment using a hazardous form of ammonia, but adding that it may be needed for no more than three years. The $100 million system being installed at the coal-fired Brandon Shores plant - needed to meet new standards for nitrogen oxide emissions in five warm-weather months - has raised concern because of the need to truck in anhydrous ammonia.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 14, 2009
John L. Edler, a retired utility company executive whose career with Baltimore Gas and Electric and later Constellation Energy spanned four decades, died of a cardiac arrest Nov. 4 at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center. He was 70 and lived in Bel Air. Mr. Edler, the son of an Esskay worker and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Canton. The day after graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1957, Mr. Edler began his BGE career, working as a draftsman. While continuing to work for BGE during the day, Mr. Edler studied mechanical engineering at night at the Johns Hopkins University, where he earned his degree in 1967.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun Reporter | May 25, 2007
In a major shift, Gov. Martin O'Malley's environmental agency has decided to enforce air pollution rules at coal-fired power plants that were routinely ignored under past administrations. The Maryland Department of the Environment announced yesterday a settlement with Constellation Energy that will impose $100,000 in penalties and require $9 million in pollution control equipment at its H. A. Wagner and Brandon Shores power plants in Anne Arundel County, and the C. P. Crane power plant in eastern Baltimore County.
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