Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBrandon Lee
IN THE NEWS

Brandon Lee

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | August 25, 1992
There is a priceless moment in "Rapid Fire," where Brandon Lee is transformed by anger from a scared college kid to a vengeful fighting machine. Co-star Powers Boothe, playing an older and wiser heroic sort, advises Mr. Lee to calm down and get his "fists of fury" under control.The reference may sail right over the heads of the customers who don't keep track of such things. But it's a small treat for the fans: Mr. Boothe's line in "Rapid Fire," which opened at area theaters Friday, is a nod to Lo Wei's "Fists of Fury" (China; 1972)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2003
While adults were strolling among the vendors' booths and exhibits at Artscape yesterday, their children were discovering art through painting projects, crafts and entertainment from monkey trainers and tutu-wearing singers. "We try to get them out to do hands-on activities," said Tracy Baskerville, public relations director for Baltimore's Office of Promotion and the Arts. "That's how to grab kids and get them interested in art." Her boss, Bill Gilmore, dubbed the area that concentrated on children's activities "Kidscape."
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 15, 1994
"The Crow," the death-haunted, mega-violent, pulpy, vigorous final film of Brandon Lee, may not qualify as much of a monument to a lost life -- what film could? -- but it's a hell of a movie.It's one of those strange numbers that can only be classified as being of a piece, meaning that however you feel about the value of what it sets out to do, you must admit that it does it brilliantly.And here's what it sets out to do: to compress into one seamless threnody the sensibilities of film noir, urban gothic and slam-bang comic-book energy while sounding chords of nihilism and cynicism and very loud rock 'n' roll.
NEWS
June 6, 2003
On June 3, 2003, MARY JANE, beloved wife of the late Anderson Lee, devoted mother of Leroy Lee Ennis, grandmother of Leroy Lee, Jr. and Rhonda M. Lee, and great-grandmother of Brandon Lee; also survived by a host of nieces, nephews, family and friends. Friends may call at the Betts Funeral Home, 1129 N. Caroline ST, on Friday, June 6, 2003, from 2 to 7 P.M. Mary Jane will lie in state on Saturday, June 7, 2003, at 10:30 A.M. at New Pilgrim Baptist Church, 629 N. Washington Street. Family will receive friends from 10:30 to 11:30 A.M., followed by funeral services.
NEWS
June 6, 2003
On June 3, 2003, MARY JANE, beloved wife of the late Anderson Lee, devoted mother of Leroy Lee Ennis, grandmother of Leroy Lee, Jr. and Rhonda M. Lee, and great-grandmother of Brandon Lee; also survived by a host of nieces, nephews, family and friends. Friends may call at the Betts Funeral Home, 1129 N. Caroline ST, on Friday, June 6, 2003, from 2 to 7 P.M. Mary Jane will lie in state on Saturday, June 7, 2003, at 10:30 A.M. at New Pilgrim Baptist Church, 629 N. Washington Street. Family will receive friends from 10:30 to 11:30 A.M., followed by funeral services.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 21, 1992
'Rapid Fire'Starring Brandon Lee and Powers Boothe.Directed by Dwight H. Little.Released by Twentieth Century Fox.Rated R.**Instead of calling it "Rapid Fire" they should have called it "Rapid Editing." The movie just jackhammers along at a breakneck pace: itfeelslikeasentencewithallthespacesbe- tweenthewordsremoved.When it's over, you're in oxygen debt.Conceived of as a star-making vehicle for Brandon Lee, the son )) of Bruce Lee, the film somewhat blunders in this primary assignment: The young man is in such a state of perpetual motion, you hardly ever see him. It is clear, however, that however proficient a martial artist he seems to be, he doesn't quite have the psycho intensity of his father.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 19, 1991
''Showdown in Little Tokyo'' is good enough fun when it sticks to karate and related physical activity. Unfortunately, the film goes ugly now and then and when it does, it's really ugly. It includes, for instance, decapitation, amputation and finger-cutting.The last, of course, is a given. This is a film about the Yakuza, the Japanese Mafia, and in all films about this group, there is always a finger-cutting sequence, and it's always a little finger that goes.Apparently, it's a Yakuza tradition.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2003
While adults were strolling among the vendors' booths and exhibits at Artscape yesterday, their children were discovering art through painting projects, crafts and entertainment from monkey trainers and tutu-wearing singers. "We try to get them out to do hands-on activities," said Tracy Baskerville, public relations director for Baltimore's Office of Promotion and the Arts. "That's how to grab kids and get them interested in art." Her boss, Bill Gilmore, dubbed the area that concentrated on children's activities "Kidscape."
SPORTS
By RICK BELZ | May 11, 1994
Centennial, Glenelg and Oakland Mills all won their final league games Friday to produce the first three-way tie for the county boys lacrosse championship. All are 5-1 in league play.The title is especially noteworthy for Oakland Mills because it was that school's first.The No. 12 Scorpions (11-2) start four seniors after graduating eight starters from last season's regional championship team that went 13-4.Defense is the team's trademark. It has allowed only 5.3 goals per game and is led by defensemen Chris Sheldon, John Campbell, Lang Wethington and first-year sophomore goalkeeper Jason Berlin, who has 132 saves on 191 shots.
NEWS
August 18, 2005
JOHN E. WARD, JR., of Perry Hall, MD, formerly of Chesapeake Beach, MD on August 16, 2005. Beloved husband of Teri Nicole Ward; beloved father of Brandon Lee Ward; beloved son of John E. Ward, Sr., and Carole W. Elliott and her husband Donnie; brother of Joel "Joey" Ward and Cara, John and William Elliott; grandson of Sue Ward; also surviving are many aunts, uncles, cousins and friends. Family and friends may call at the Rausch Funeral Home, 8325 Mt. Harmony Lane, Owings, MD today (Thursday)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 15, 1994
"The Crow," the death-haunted, mega-violent, pulpy, vigorous final film of Brandon Lee, may not qualify as much of a monument to a lost life -- what film could? -- but it's a hell of a movie.It's one of those strange numbers that can only be classified as being of a piece, meaning that however you feel about the value of what it sets out to do, you must admit that it does it brilliantly.And here's what it sets out to do: to compress into one seamless threnody the sensibilities of film noir, urban gothic and slam-bang comic-book energy while sounding chords of nihilism and cynicism and very loud rock 'n' roll.
SPORTS
By RICK BELZ | May 11, 1994
Centennial, Glenelg and Oakland Mills all won their final league games Friday to produce the first three-way tie for the county boys lacrosse championship. All are 5-1 in league play.The title is especially noteworthy for Oakland Mills because it was that school's first.The No. 12 Scorpions (11-2) start four seniors after graduating eight starters from last season's regional championship team that went 13-4.Defense is the team's trademark. It has allowed only 5.3 goals per game and is led by defensemen Chris Sheldon, John Campbell, Lang Wethington and first-year sophomore goalkeeper Jason Berlin, who has 132 saves on 191 shots.
FEATURES
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | August 25, 1992
There is a priceless moment in "Rapid Fire," where Brandon Lee is transformed by anger from a scared college kid to a vengeful fighting machine. Co-star Powers Boothe, playing an older and wiser heroic sort, advises Mr. Lee to calm down and get his "fists of fury" under control.The reference may sail right over the heads of the customers who don't keep track of such things. But it's a small treat for the fans: Mr. Boothe's line in "Rapid Fire," which opened at area theaters Friday, is a nod to Lo Wei's "Fists of Fury" (China; 1972)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 21, 1992
'Rapid Fire'Starring Brandon Lee and Powers Boothe.Directed by Dwight H. Little.Released by Twentieth Century Fox.Rated R.**Instead of calling it "Rapid Fire" they should have called it "Rapid Editing." The movie just jackhammers along at a breakneck pace: itfeelslikeasentencewithallthespacesbe- tweenthewordsremoved.When it's over, you're in oxygen debt.Conceived of as a star-making vehicle for Brandon Lee, the son )) of Bruce Lee, the film somewhat blunders in this primary assignment: The young man is in such a state of perpetual motion, you hardly ever see him. It is clear, however, that however proficient a martial artist he seems to be, he doesn't quite have the psycho intensity of his father.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 19, 1991
''Showdown in Little Tokyo'' is good enough fun when it sticks to karate and related physical activity. Unfortunately, the film goes ugly now and then and when it does, it's really ugly. It includes, for instance, decapitation, amputation and finger-cutting.The last, of course, is a given. This is a film about the Yakuza, the Japanese Mafia, and in all films about this group, there is always a finger-cutting sequence, and it's always a little finger that goes.Apparently, it's a Yakuza tradition.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.