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Brandi Chastain

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By PAUL MCMULLEN and PAUL MCMULLEN,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2000
Brandi Chastain was in Manhattan last July, when she displayed a wit that is not yet as famous as her torso. "I was in New York City to meet with my agent, and we were taking a cab that went through Central Park," Chastain said. "People were working out in all sorts of attire, and women were in their jog bras. I told my agent that he had better alert the press." A woman working out in a sports bra is commonplace. So is the sight of a jersey coming off of a soccer player in celebration, but when Chastain combined the two at the climax of last year's World Cup, it caused a commotion and added fuel to the inferno that the women's national team had become.
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SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | September 21, 2003
TURN ON THE TV, go to the neighborhood tavern and watch some of the Women's World Cup, whose broadcasts start today with the U.S. team's 12:30 p.m. opener against Sweden at RFK Stadium on ABC. That's the advice from defender Joy Fawcett. The 35-year-old U.S. national team veteran believes it's again time for everyone to take a look. Mia Hamm is better fit and a better player than ever before - if that's possible. The Swedes should give the United States a good match. And if Germany and the U.S. team advance to their destined semifinal, it should prove an epic showdown.
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SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
FAIRFAX, Va. -- U.S. women's soccer coach Tony DiCicco prattles at times over the importance of what he calls "personality players."He means "stars." Such as Mia Hamm, possibly the most widely publicized No. 9 in sports today, and Michelle Akers, the chronic fatigue syndrome-coper, oldest U.S. player and legend in the sport. Such as Julie Foudy, the chattiest midfielder who ever rejected admission to Stanford's medical school and punctuated it by kicking a doc for a beer maker's Women's World Cup TV ad.Not that she's anonymous, but the name Brandi Chastain doesn't jump to mind as fast when DiCicco turns cliche-monger.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2001
WASHINGTON - The new Women's United Soccer Association stepped onto the national sports stage yesterday with the Washington Freedom facing the Bay Area CyberRays in an inaugural game that was more than a game. It also was Washington's Mia Hamm going up against Bay Area's Brandi Chastain - two of the league's most prominent figures. Ironically, and fittingly, the afternoon's historical debut in front of 34,148 soccer enthusiasts at RFK Stadium had Hamm and Chastain isolated at the right wing in the game's decisive moment.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | July 25, 1999
Bras are in the news again. Instead of refusing to wear them, as we did in the free-love '60s, instead of burning them, as we did in the feminist '70s, women are ripping off their shirts and showing off their bras in ecstatic celebrations of victory.Brandi Chastain and her black sports bra made the cover of national newspapers and magazines after her penalty kick won soccer's World Cup for the American women. She didn't look sexy as much as she looked lean and primal and full of teeth-clenching joy. I'm not a guy, but I found myself looking at her abs. She has the chest of a young boy, but gee whiz, what a six-pack.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1999
The 20 women chosen to wear America's colors in quest of the third Women's World Cup, the final round of which opens 31 days from today in East Rutherford, N.J., were named yesterday in Chicago.Coach Tony DiCicco's roster includes 13 players from his Olympic gold medalists three years ago, as well as six who helped the Americans win the first women's world championship in 1991.But it's no stand-pat roster. DiCicco has blended in eight young players, who will get to experience the intensity and glamour of competing in what, off ticket sales and world TV commitments, will be history's most widely watched women's sports event.
NEWS
July 13, 1999
THE U.S. conquest of China for the Women's World Cup of soccer gave Americans their greatest thrill in a team they knew little about since the unheralded men's hockey team won the 1980 winter Olympics.It was a watershed in the nation's social history. Sport will never be quite the same.With 90,185 screaming fans in the Rose Bowl and 40 million watching on television in this nation (and untold millions at 4 a.m. in China), this was the most-watched soccer game and most-watched women's athletic competition in U.S. history.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2001
WASHINGTON - The new Women's United Soccer Association stepped onto the national sports stage yesterday with the Washington Freedom facing the Bay Area CyberRays in an inaugural game that was more than a game. It also was Washington's Mia Hamm going up against Bay Area's Brandi Chastain - two of the league's most prominent figures. Ironically, and fittingly, the afternoon's historical debut in front of 34,148 soccer enthusiasts at RFK Stadium had Hamm and Chastain isolated at the right wing in the game's decisive moment.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | September 21, 2003
TURN ON THE TV, go to the neighborhood tavern and watch some of the Women's World Cup, whose broadcasts start today with the U.S. team's 12:30 p.m. opener against Sweden at RFK Stadium on ABC. That's the advice from defender Joy Fawcett. The 35-year-old U.S. national team veteran believes it's again time for everyone to take a look. Mia Hamm is better fit and a better player than ever before - if that's possible. The Swedes should give the United States a good match. And if Germany and the U.S. team advance to their destined semifinal, it should prove an epic showdown.
SPORTS
By DETROIT FREE PRESS | September 25, 2000
CANBERRA, Australia - Bruce Stadium howled. The boos got louder and louder as the minutes passed yesterday, and when the match was over and the U.S. women's soccer team had a 1-0 semifinal victory over Brazil, they reached their peak. "Who cares?" said U.S. defender Kate Sobrero. "We're going to the gold-medal game." Thanks to Mia Hamm's controversial goal in the 60th minute, the Americans advanced to Thursday's final. They will play Norway, the team they dominated, 2-0, in the opener but also the only team that has a winning record against them all-time, 13-12-1.
SPORTS
By PAUL MCMULLEN and PAUL MCMULLEN,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2000
Brandi Chastain was in Manhattan last July, when she displayed a wit that is not yet as famous as her torso. "I was in New York City to meet with my agent, and we were taking a cab that went through Central Park," Chastain said. "People were working out in all sorts of attire, and women were in their jog bras. I told my agent that he had better alert the press." A woman working out in a sports bra is commonplace. So is the sight of a jersey coming off of a soccer player in celebration, but when Chastain combined the two at the climax of last year's World Cup, it caused a commotion and added fuel to the inferno that the women's national team had become.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | July 25, 1999
Bras are in the news again. Instead of refusing to wear them, as we did in the free-love '60s, instead of burning them, as we did in the feminist '70s, women are ripping off their shirts and showing off their bras in ecstatic celebrations of victory.Brandi Chastain and her black sports bra made the cover of national newspapers and magazines after her penalty kick won soccer's World Cup for the American women. She didn't look sexy as much as she looked lean and primal and full of teeth-clenching joy. I'm not a guy, but I found myself looking at her abs. She has the chest of a young boy, but gee whiz, what a six-pack.
NEWS
July 13, 1999
THE U.S. conquest of China for the Women's World Cup of soccer gave Americans their greatest thrill in a team they knew little about since the unheralded men's hockey team won the 1980 winter Olympics.It was a watershed in the nation's social history. Sport will never be quite the same.With 90,185 screaming fans in the Rose Bowl and 40 million watching on television in this nation (and untold millions at 4 a.m. in China), this was the most-watched soccer game and most-watched women's athletic competition in U.S. history.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
FAIRFAX, Va. -- U.S. women's soccer coach Tony DiCicco prattles at times over the importance of what he calls "personality players."He means "stars." Such as Mia Hamm, possibly the most widely publicized No. 9 in sports today, and Michelle Akers, the chronic fatigue syndrome-coper, oldest U.S. player and legend in the sport. Such as Julie Foudy, the chattiest midfielder who ever rejected admission to Stanford's medical school and punctuated it by kicking a doc for a beer maker's Women's World Cup TV ad.Not that she's anonymous, but the name Brandi Chastain doesn't jump to mind as fast when DiCicco turns cliche-monger.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1999
The 20 women chosen to wear America's colors in quest of the third Women's World Cup, the final round of which opens 31 days from today in East Rutherford, N.J., were named yesterday in Chicago.Coach Tony DiCicco's roster includes 13 players from his Olympic gold medalists three years ago, as well as six who helped the Americans win the first women's world championship in 1991.But it's no stand-pat roster. DiCicco has blended in eight young players, who will get to experience the intensity and glamour of competing in what, off ticket sales and world TV commitments, will be history's most widely watched women's sports event.
FEATURES
September 29, 1999
What is your favorite ice cream flavor?Mike Piazza, catcher, New York Mets: "Bubble gum. You bite into it and get a piece of gum. It is good ice cream with a chew."Brandi Chastain, defender, U.S. women's soccer team: "I have two flavors that are my favorites: chocolate-chip cookie dough and vanilla-Swiss almond. I can eat a whole pint of ice cream in one sitting, no problem!"Ilia Kulik, figure skater, Olympic gold medalist: "Just plain vanilla with lots of toppings: strawberries, raspberries, chocolate sprinkles, and hot caramel or hot fudge sauce."
NEWS
July 16, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Boston Globe, which was published Wednesday.BESIDES the victory, the thrill of the Women's World Cup soccer game was how well it played out in the hearts of fans.These players have pulled off a nearly chivalrous balance. They are aggressive athletes but with a gentle love for the game.In this world of pure joy about the game, the word "confidence" shakes off its hackneyed shell. It becomes a crackling term that bundles the virtues of practice, focus, desire and hard work.
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