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By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 26, 1996
BERLIN -- The bureaucrat's computer clicks and whirs, and onto the screen comes bad news concerning Tree No. 00018-L0022 in the district of Zehlendorf.It has been chopped down at the ripe old age of 117, after city workers detected a case of poisoning by "Hundeurin."Translation: Death by dog urine.The bureaucrat, Hans-Achim Gottlebe, keeps punching keys, and we learn that five other trees in the district have died this way during the past two years. In each case he can tell you the kind of tree, its age, its size, its street, its fungus problems and even more, if you care to know.
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NEWS
By Agence France-Presse | November 9, 2009
BERLIN - -Germany's capital warmed up for the 20th anniversary of the Wall's fall with events throughout the city, as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton called for a new trans-Atlantic push to free those still oppressed. "Our history did not end the night the Wall came down," Clinton told current and former European and U.S. political heavyweights on the eve of the celebrations marking the end of the Cold War and the continent's division. "To expand freedom to more people, we cannot accept that freedom does not belong to all people.
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NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | November 10, 1992
BERLIN -- The chill, damp night wind whips through the Brandenburg Gate, ripples the white flags over the poignant homemade peace shrine and rattles Guido Schollbach's tent.Guido guards the shrine in the night. He watches over its candles and flowers, its skulls that represent dead children, its mutilated dolls.His pop-up tent squats incongruously in the middle of a square once barred to all but Prussian nobility. His tent and the shrine he watches over are on a traffic island that marks the very beginning of Unter den Linden, the great imperial boulevard that runs through the heart of Berlin.
NEWS
By Michael Finnegan and Michael Finnegan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 25, 2008
BERLIN - He has drawn record-breaking crowds to rallies all over the United States. But it took a trip to Germany for Barack Obama to attract his biggest audience of all: More than 200,000 people packed into a central Berlin park yesterday to hear Obama give a wide-ranging speech on his call for closer ties between Europe and America. The sea of people in the Tiergarten, Berlin's central park, stretched a full mile, from the Victory Column where Obama spoke to the historic Brandenburg Gate.
NEWS
By Agence France-Presse | November 9, 2009
BERLIN - -Germany's capital warmed up for the 20th anniversary of the Wall's fall with events throughout the city, as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton called for a new trans-Atlantic push to free those still oppressed. "Our history did not end the night the Wall came down," Clinton told current and former European and U.S. political heavyweights on the eve of the celebrations marking the end of the Cold War and the continent's division. "To expand freedom to more people, we cannot accept that freedom does not belong to all people.
NEWS
By Michael Finnegan and Michael Finnegan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 25, 2008
BERLIN - He has drawn record-breaking crowds to rallies all over the United States. But it took a trip to Germany for Barack Obama to attract his biggest audience of all: More than 200,000 people packed into a central Berlin park yesterday to hear Obama give a wide-ranging speech on his call for closer ties between Europe and America. The sea of people in the Tiergarten, Berlin's central park, stretched a full mile, from the Victory Column where Obama spoke to the historic Brandenburg Gate.
NEWS
By DAN FESPERMAN and DAN FESPERMAN,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1997
For more than 50 years, the center of Berlin has been a theme park of 20th-century infamy.Look down the wide boulevard of Unter den Linden and you see the path where Adolf Hitler's legions goose-stepped through their grandest parades. Look up at the bronze horses atop the Brandenburg Gate and you see a monument that was the centerpiece of the Cold War's most despised and important boundary.Gaze a block or so to the north and you can't miss the hulk of the Reichstag, the parliamentary building abused by Hitler for his own devices in 1933, then seized upon by photographers at the end of World War II as it stood in ruins, the ultimate symbol of an empire tossed upon the scrap heap.
NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne | October 3, 1991
Berlin -- Berlin on the first anniversary of German reunification is a strange, exciting and disorienting place for a newspaperman whose entire career has been bracketed by the Cold War.I first saw the city riding the Airlift in 1949. It was a mass of rubble, a monument to the destruction wrought by the Hitler legions who had goose-stepped down the Unter den Linden only a few years before.Berlin, what there was of it, was still one huge single metropolis -- the largest between Paris and Moscow -- despite Soviet, French, British and American sectors where the four military commanders governed.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 11, 2005
BERLIN - Sixty years after the words Auschwitz, Dachau and Buchenwald took on a terrible new meaning, Germany has offered the world a simple but dramatic gesture of public atonement. In the center of Berlin, in the shadow of the Brandenburg Gate and the dome of the Reichstag, on ground where Adolf Hitler's ministries once stood, there now stands a memorial to the 6 million Jews who died in the Holocaust. Berlin, an old imperial city reinvented as the capital of a new Germany, has its share of monumental architecture, but it never has had anything like American architect Peter Eisenman's Holocaust memorial, officially known as the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe.
NEWS
By MARK SIMON | February 11, 2000
On a rainy night in late September, I climbed into a taxi in Berlin, heading for the airport. Noting my camera equipment, the young, skinhead driver, in his de rigeur black, asked me where I was headed. "Vienna, for the election," I replied. "Will you see Haider?" he wanted to know. "I think so," I replied. "Isn't he great?" he asked. I did get to meet the extreme right-wing politician Joerg Haider, in the baroque Austrian capital. He is smart, cool, photogenic, a chameleon, a master of making provocative, racist, even revisionist statements and, later, half-heartedly reversing himself, as if they were small, inconsequential errors.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 11, 2005
BERLIN - Sixty years after the words Auschwitz, Dachau and Buchenwald took on a terrible new meaning, Germany has offered the world a simple but dramatic gesture of public atonement. In the center of Berlin, in the shadow of the Brandenburg Gate and the dome of the Reichstag, on ground where Adolf Hitler's ministries once stood, there now stands a memorial to the 6 million Jews who died in the Holocaust. Berlin, an old imperial city reinvented as the capital of a new Germany, has its share of monumental architecture, but it never has had anything like American architect Peter Eisenman's Holocaust memorial, officially known as the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe.
NEWS
By MARK SIMON | February 11, 2000
On a rainy night in late September, I climbed into a taxi in Berlin, heading for the airport. Noting my camera equipment, the young, skinhead driver, in his de rigeur black, asked me where I was headed. "Vienna, for the election," I replied. "Will you see Haider?" he wanted to know. "I think so," I replied. "Isn't he great?" he asked. I did get to meet the extreme right-wing politician Joerg Haider, in the baroque Austrian capital. He is smart, cool, photogenic, a chameleon, a master of making provocative, racist, even revisionist statements and, later, half-heartedly reversing himself, as if they were small, inconsequential errors.
NEWS
By DAN FESPERMAN and DAN FESPERMAN,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1997
For more than 50 years, the center of Berlin has been a theme park of 20th-century infamy.Look down the wide boulevard of Unter den Linden and you see the path where Adolf Hitler's legions goose-stepped through their grandest parades. Look up at the bronze horses atop the Brandenburg Gate and you see a monument that was the centerpiece of the Cold War's most despised and important boundary.Gaze a block or so to the north and you can't miss the hulk of the Reichstag, the parliamentary building abused by Hitler for his own devices in 1933, then seized upon by photographers at the end of World War II as it stood in ruins, the ultimate symbol of an empire tossed upon the scrap heap.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 26, 1996
BERLIN -- The bureaucrat's computer clicks and whirs, and onto the screen comes bad news concerning Tree No. 00018-L0022 in the district of Zehlendorf.It has been chopped down at the ripe old age of 117, after city workers detected a case of poisoning by "Hundeurin."Translation: Death by dog urine.The bureaucrat, Hans-Achim Gottlebe, keeps punching keys, and we learn that five other trees in the district have died this way during the past two years. In each case he can tell you the kind of tree, its age, its size, its street, its fungus problems and even more, if you care to know.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | November 10, 1992
BERLIN -- The chill, damp night wind whips through the Brandenburg Gate, ripples the white flags over the poignant homemade peace shrine and rattles Guido Schollbach's tent.Guido guards the shrine in the night. He watches over its candles and flowers, its skulls that represent dead children, its mutilated dolls.His pop-up tent squats incongruously in the middle of a square once barred to all but Prussian nobility. His tent and the shrine he watches over are on a traffic island that marks the very beginning of Unter den Linden, the great imperial boulevard that runs through the heart of Berlin.
NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne | October 3, 1991
Berlin -- Berlin on the first anniversary of German reunification is a strange, exciting and disorienting place for a newspaperman whose entire career has been bracketed by the Cold War.I first saw the city riding the Airlift in 1949. It was a mass of rubble, a monument to the destruction wrought by the Hitler legions who had goose-stepped down the Unter den Linden only a few years before.Berlin, what there was of it, was still one huge single metropolis -- the largest between Paris and Moscow -- despite Soviet, French, British and American sectors where the four military commanders governed.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 18, 1999
BERLIN -- After a bitter debate over how to commemorate the Holocaust in the new German capital, Berlin, agreement has been reached on a memorial that will include a vast field of stone pillars, a 65-foot-high wall of books and a research center for scholars.The accord has been approved by Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder but is subject to parliamentary review. It blends long-standing proposals by the New York architect Peter Eisenman with additions intended to satisfy the new government of Social Democrats and Greens, whose initial declarations last year opposed a vast memorial and caused an uproar.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 29, 1998
BERLIN -- Politics is being blamed for this week's major delay in a decade-old quest to build a Holocaust memorial in the heart of this once and future capital.But the latest postponement of the project's go-ahead vote, until after Germany's federal election Sept. 27, has also raised a previously unspeakable question: How much national soul-searching over Nazi-era atrocities is enough?"Too much remembering?" the respected weekly Der Spiegel asked on this week's cover, arguing that the protracted squabbling over the memorial masks a more deeply rooted reluctance to bring the wartime horrors so vividly to public attention.
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