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October 19, 2006
The London-based Brand New Heavies, famous for bringing soul music back to live instrumentation and vocals, are in Towson on Saturday. With the return of lead singer N'Dea Davenport, the band's latest album, Get Used To It, has received glowing reviews for its blend of classic live funk and soul. Doors open at 8 p.m. for Saturday's show at the Recher Theatre, 512 York Road, in Towson. Tickets are $20, $23 for those younger than 21. Call 410-337-7210 or 410-547-SEAT for tickets, or visit ticketmaster.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
Seated at a downtown coffee shop last week, Victoria Vox quickly noticed the table was wobbly and uneven. Rather than ignore the minor nuisance, the 34-year-old singer-songwriter took the newspaper she walked in with, folded up a few pages and stuck it under the table's leg. She punctuated the correction with a shrug. "I fix things," Vox said nonchalantly. Born Victoria Davitt, Vox's do-it-herself mentality has served her well since May 2003, when she quit her managerial job at New York & Company in the mall of her hometown, Green Bay, Wis. Since then, music has been her only career.
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FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 11, 1999
NEW YORK -- For the fans, Sting has always been a musician's musician, the kind of player whose confidence and ability seemed worlds away from the garage-band amateurism of many rock stars. It isn't just that the former Police-man is a multi-instrumentalist, handling not only bass and guitar but also keyboards and (for a while) saxophone; he's also a jack of all styles, being as well-versed in jazz and classical music as he is in rock.But for his own part, the 48-year-old pop star takes a much more modest view of his abilities.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2012
Chew on this: Adults — not children — account for 65 percent of gummi candy consumption in the United States. And that appetite is growing, if Haribo of America Inc.'s sales are any indication. U.S. sales for the Woodlawn-based division of the German candy maker have grown in double digits in each of the past five years, and more than 20 percent in 2011, said Christian Jegen, president of Haribo of America. Known for inventing gummi bears, Haribo began mass-marketing the fruity, chewy candy in the United States in the 1980s.
NEWS
By Newsday | August 5, 1993
Ain't no drag, Papa's got a brand new bridge.So if you want to cross the new bridge in Steamboat Springs, Colo., you'd better get on the good foot, because after seven months of wrangling, the town has named it the James Brown Soul Center of the Universe Bridge.And how does the Godfather of Soul, James Brown, feel about all this:"It's one of the things that makes me feel good." You knew that it would, now."Well, that's so good, so good, so good, so good," Mr. Brown said from Augusta, Ga.Mr.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2000
Tenants of Maryland's technology incubators say the programs provide a needed scientific boost for start-up companies but worry about what will happen when they outgrow their nests and need more space, according to a study released yesterday by the Maryland Technology Development Corp. The companies surveyed were concerned about whether commercial space will be available to accommodate them after they graduate from the incubator programs. State officials said the concern is valid. "Fast-growing technology businesses cannot wait for space," said Richard C. Mike Lewin, Maryland's secretary of business and economic development.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | August 9, 2007
Jonathan Butler doesn't think of it as new musical direction. The jazzy pop-soul singer-musician, perhaps best known for his late '80s/early '90s R&B hits such as "Lies" and "Sarah, Sarah," is now adding his laid-back, George Benson-influenced flair to gospel. He doesn't necessarily see Brand New Day, his latest album, as a break from the impassioned secular work he has done for the past 30 years. "I think it's something that's been a long time coming," says Butler, who plays Pier Six Concert Pavilion tonight with smooth-jazz saxophonist Boney James as part of the PAETEC Jazz Festival.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | November 7, 2000
Martin O'Malley reaches for Parris Glendening's wallet because he cannot reach for his heart. Who knows if the governor of Maryland has one? O'Malley wants $300 million in state money; Glendening wants a little respect. He forgets, without the city of Baltimore, we are now looking at the second gubernatorial administration of Ellen Sauerbrey. This $300 million helps the city shake off its second-class American citizenship. The country goes to the polls today in stunningly better economic shape than anyone can remember - but this city has been left behind.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | March 20, 2004
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - It doesn't take long to get used to watching Miguel Tejada play baseball. It doesn't take long to decide it's a real rip, not unlike the two hits he lashed off his ever-cracking bat yesterday in the Orioles' 3-1 win over the Dodgers. It doesn't take long to realize, "Oh right, this is what it means to have an MVP on the team. This is what it's like to have a player who elevates the energy and execution level of an entire team, an entire franchise." "I enjoy playing baseball," Tejada said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 25, 1994
ABOVE THE RIMThe Soundtrack (Death Row/Interscope 92359)Rap producer Dr. Dre has talked about wanting to make his Death Row label the Motown of the '90s, and after listening to the tracks he assembled for the soundtrack album to "Above the Rim," it's easy to believe he'll do it. As expected, there's plenty of killer rap here, from the tough-talking, bass-pumping "Afro Puffs" by the Lady of Rage, to Nate Dogg & Warren G's lazilycompelling "Regulate."...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
Since Charles Village Pub & Patio in downtown Towson was devastated by a two-alarm fire last January, customers, Towson students, and neighbors have been asking owner Rick Bielski when the popular hangout would re-open. This week, he finally had an answer: "We'll be up and running mid-to-late March," he said. That's what he's shooting for anyway. Bielski had said before the bar, which was heavily damaged after an afternoon fire January 29 , would re-open March 1 at the latest.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
It looks like The Fillmore isn't the only new music venue opening this Fall. Mist nightclub in the Inner Harbor will be replaced in September by a brand new music venue, Baltimore SoundStage, it will be announced today. The venue, which is scheduled to open on Labor Day, intends to present "touring artists in an intimate club environment," according to the announcement. Shows will be presented for standing room-only crowds but also, depending on the act, in a seated format.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Airy, thewinekey@aol.com | July 28, 2011
New Zealand has long been known for its tangy Sauvignon Blancs that explode on the palate in a riot of pink grapefruit, but some new brands have entered the market that offer a true cornucopia of summer fruit, and vegetables. Mohua Sauvignon Blanc 2010, Marlborough New Zealand ($14), is pure passion fruit. Its flavors are lush, ripe and exotic, wrapped around such a core of vibrant acidity that each sip makes the mouth water. Positively stunning. It's flavors are so pure that it would be a pity to pair this wine with food; simply serve it up with friends and family.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard | Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2010
Two iron lamps on chunky fieldstone posts straddle the entrance to a driveway that ambles past a sprawling front lawn and ends at the side garages attached to the equally sprawling, two-story Provencal-style home of the Twigg family. The gray stucco of the exterior, with gables, second-floor dormers and four white columns supporting a large roof over the front porch, would suggest an established estate were it not for new saplings planted along the ends of the property and the construction of houses rising nearby.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 10, 2010
Two fire engines, including one just purchased for $600,000, two paramedic units, a brush truck and a U.S. Army Humvee were destroyed in an early morning fire at a Dundalk firehouse, according to a department spokesman. The two-alarm blaze that began shortly after 3 a.m. caused the roof to collapse at the Engine 6 building at Dunman Way and Merritt Boulevard, a block from the Dundalk Middle School. A cause of the fire remains under investigation, said spokesman Kyrle Preis. Officials said firefighters sleeping in the firehouse's living quarters, which is next to the fire engine bay, awoke to the sound of a fire alarm.
TRAVEL
By Diane Stoneback and Diane Stoneback,Tribune Newspapers | May 10, 2009
Watching the brilliant yellow-to-scarlet-to-purple sundowns or the Cape May-Lewes Ferry peacefully plying the Delaware Bay from Cape May's Sunset Beach, it's hard to imagine the turbulent times when this beautiful location was heavily fortified and played a vital role in the nation's homeland defense system. But the grand opening Saturday of the newly restored World War II Lookout Tower (Fire Control Tower No. 23) Museum and Memorial brings a very different time into focus. "The fire tower, constructed in 1942, is our centerpiece in recent efforts to emphasize Cape May's largely underappreciated and under-publicized role during World War II," says Robert Heinly, museum coordinator for the Mid-Atlantic Center for the Arts in Cape May, which has spent the last seven years restoring the stark concrete tower.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2005
`Baby' at Dundalk Richard Maltby Jr. and David Shire's 1983 Broadway musical Baby, about the experiences of three sets of parents-to-be, opens at Dundalk Community Theatre tomorrow. John Desmone directs a cast headed by Lauren Spencer-Harris and Brent Bell as a pair of young marrieds, Shannon Woll- man and John O'Brien as a 30-something couple, and Liz Boyer Hunnicutt and Michael Quinn as empty nesters dealing with an unexpected pregnancy. Show times at Dundalk Community Theatre, on the Community College of Baltimore County's Dundalk campus, 7200 Sollers Point Road, are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 3 p.m. Sundays, through Feb. 27. Tickets are $20. Call 410-285-9667.
NEWS
March 11, 1993
Better TimesFor over a year, we have been overwhelmed with shouting and screaming about the awful times we have endured since Ronald Reagan was elected president in 1980 and George Bush was unelected in 1992.Well, it is an indisputable fact that during the Reagan-Bush years, 18 million new jobs were created.Does anyone, even with only one-quarter of his sanity remaining, believe that the Clinton years will come anywhere near equaling this record? Have you heard anyone in his administration so much as attempting to predict even an approach to such an accomplishment?
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,edward.lee@baltsun.com | January 17, 2009
The Ravens' three-headed monster at running back could get some of its bite back tomorrow with the full return of rookie Ray Rice. Rice had missed four consecutive games because of a bruised left shin and played sparingly in the Ravens' 13-10 win over the Tennessee Titans last Saturday. He could get a greater workload in the AFC championship game against the Pittsburgh Steelers. "I'm ready to go full speed," Rice said. "I was ready to play against Jacksonville. I suited up for Miami. Tennessee, I was ready to go, and I played a couple plays in the third quarter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | August 9, 2007
Jonathan Butler doesn't think of it as new musical direction. The jazzy pop-soul singer-musician, perhaps best known for his late '80s/early '90s R&B hits such as "Lies" and "Sarah, Sarah," is now adding his laid-back, George Benson-influenced flair to gospel. He doesn't necessarily see Brand New Day, his latest album, as a break from the impassioned secular work he has done for the past 30 years. "I think it's something that's been a long time coming," says Butler, who plays Pier Six Concert Pavilion tonight with smooth-jazz saxophonist Boney James as part of the PAETEC Jazz Festival.
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