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SPORTS
June 22, 1995
Syd Thrift, Orioles director of player developmentThe five best baseball minds since his involvement in professional baseball began in 1949.1. Branch Rickey Sr., former Brooklyn Dodgers and St. Louis Cardinals general manager. "He was in a class all by himself as a visionary, yet practical. He saw things way into the future."2. Branch Rickey Jr., former Pittsburgh Pirates executive. "Sharp baseball mind with great feelings, empathy for people."3. Ewing Kauffman, former Kansas City Royals owner.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 9, 2014
The outrageously bigoted remarks attributed to the owner of the Los Angeles Clippers basketball team mock the positive role black athletes have played in professional sports, even as those sports have served as an exit ramp from poverty. Perhaps the most incredible of Clippers owner Donald Sterling's taped remarks came when his former girlfriend reminded him that he had a whole team made up of black players. His response was: "I support them and give them food and clothes and cars and houses.
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SPORTS
November 5, 2001
He said it "It's like Obi-Wan Kenobi going head-to-head with Luke Skywalker." Brian Anderson, of Diamondbacks, on Curt Schilling facing former mentor Roger Clemens He said it "I mean, even Branch Rickey had to start somewhere." Bud Selig, baseball commissioner, citing the Brooklyn Dodgers executive who signed Jackie Robinson, in expressing his dismay at big-league clubs not filling more front office positions with minorities.
NEWS
By Charlie Vascellaro | April 22, 2013
Like most films depicting historic accounts of real-life events, the bio-epic "42" carries the immediate disclaimer that it is based on a true story, leaving room for interpretive analysis and creative license. Consequently, dramatic interpretations are by their nature subject to scrutiny and debate. While the film sticks close to the well-chronicled historic record regarding Jackie Robinson's unique place in time as the first African American to play in the major leagues, its sins are mostly of omission.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 13, 1997
AS 50TH ANNIVERSARY celebrations go, this one is a bit of a bust. This week -- Tuesday to be exact -- marks year number 50 since Jackie Robinson broke the color line in major league baseball.That April day in 1947 has long been revered by African-Americans as a great leap forward in the integration of American sports and society, an advance for the race. It's time we start calling April 15, 1947 what it actually was: an execrable and egregious insult.This is meant as no disrespect for Robinson, who was a superb athlete, a dignified, intelligent man who handled everything that was thrown at him with grace and courage.
NEWS
January 7, 2008
Damn, I love Americans. Just when you've written them off as hopeless, as a nation in decline, they turn around and do something extraordinary, which tells you why the United States of America is still the greatest nation on earth. But too, what is happening in America and Kenya holds lessons for politicians everywhere, and South Africa would do well to take heed. Barack Obama's strong lead in Iowa shows we are entering a new world, one where the Internet exposes every lie, where chat rooms allow unprecedented discussion, where blogs see commentary untrammeled by the dictates of powerful news corporations.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2013
The new Jackie Robinson movie “42” starring Chadwick Boseman, Nicole Beharie and Harrison Ford is getting mixed reviews for its depiction of the man who broke baseball's color barrier. But at least one local person is incensed that the Warner Bros. film fails to mention the role played by Sam Lacy, the long-time sports editor and columnist of the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper, in Robinson's ascension to the major leagues with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. “I think it's a travesty,”Tim Lacy, Sam Lacy's son, said of his father's exclusion in “42.” “Because if you know the story, [Sam Lacy]
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1997
By the time Rex Barney signed off with his trademark "thank you" before last night's game at Camden Yards, he had spoken volumes about the man the Orioles, and all of baseball, were honoring.Barney, the Orioles' public-address announcer, was on the field as part of the ceremonies that commemorated the 50th anniversary of Jackie Robinson breaking major-league baseball's color barrier. Also present were Vincent Lee, the last surviving member of the 1931 Baltimore Black Sox, and Ernest Burke and Bert Simmons of the 1949 Baltimore Elite Giants.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | April 16, 1997
NEW YORK -- Nice touches, the evening was full of nice touches. Jackie's grandson throwing out the first pitch. Tevin Campbell singing "The Impossible Dream." Bud Selig announcing the retirement of Robinson's No. 42.Nice talk, we heard a lot of nice talk, too, on the 50th anniversary of Robinson breaking the color barrier.Selig saying that Robinson was "bigger than the game."President Clinton thanking Robinson, Branch Rickey and the 1947 Dodgers for making America better.And, finally, Robinson's widow, Rachel, calling for a more equitable society.
NEWS
By Charlie Vascellaro | April 22, 2013
Like most films depicting historic accounts of real-life events, the bio-epic "42" carries the immediate disclaimer that it is based on a true story, leaving room for interpretive analysis and creative license. Consequently, dramatic interpretations are by their nature subject to scrutiny and debate. While the film sticks close to the well-chronicled historic record regarding Jackie Robinson's unique place in time as the first African American to play in the major leagues, its sins are mostly of omission.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2013
The new Jackie Robinson movie “42” starring Chadwick Boseman, Nicole Beharie and Harrison Ford is getting mixed reviews for its depiction of the man who broke baseball's color barrier. But at least one local person is incensed that the Warner Bros. film fails to mention the role played by Sam Lacy, the long-time sports editor and columnist of the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper, in Robinson's ascension to the major leagues with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. “I think it's a travesty,”Tim Lacy, Sam Lacy's son, said of his father's exclusion in “42.” “Because if you know the story, [Sam Lacy]
NEWS
January 7, 2008
Damn, I love Americans. Just when you've written them off as hopeless, as a nation in decline, they turn around and do something extraordinary, which tells you why the United States of America is still the greatest nation on earth. But too, what is happening in America and Kenya holds lessons for politicians everywhere, and South Africa would do well to take heed. Barack Obama's strong lead in Iowa shows we are entering a new world, one where the Internet exposes every lie, where chat rooms allow unprecedented discussion, where blogs see commentary untrammeled by the dictates of powerful news corporations.
SPORTS
November 5, 2001
He said it "It's like Obi-Wan Kenobi going head-to-head with Luke Skywalker." Brian Anderson, of Diamondbacks, on Curt Schilling facing former mentor Roger Clemens He said it "I mean, even Branch Rickey had to start somewhere." Bud Selig, baseball commissioner, citing the Brooklyn Dodgers executive who signed Jackie Robinson, in expressing his dismay at big-league clubs not filling more front office positions with minorities.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1997
By the time Rex Barney signed off with his trademark "thank you" before last night's game at Camden Yards, he had spoken volumes about the man the Orioles, and all of baseball, were honoring.Barney, the Orioles' public-address announcer, was on the field as part of the ceremonies that commemorated the 50th anniversary of Jackie Robinson breaking major-league baseball's color barrier. Also present were Vincent Lee, the last surviving member of the 1931 Baltimore Black Sox, and Ernest Burke and Bert Simmons of the 1949 Baltimore Elite Giants.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | April 16, 1997
NEW YORK -- Nice touches, the evening was full of nice touches. Jackie's grandson throwing out the first pitch. Tevin Campbell singing "The Impossible Dream." Bud Selig announcing the retirement of Robinson's No. 42.Nice talk, we heard a lot of nice talk, too, on the 50th anniversary of Robinson breaking the color barrier.Selig saying that Robinson was "bigger than the game."President Clinton thanking Robinson, Branch Rickey and the 1947 Dodgers for making America better.And, finally, Robinson's widow, Rachel, calling for a more equitable society.
SPORTS
By JERRY BEMBRY | April 15, 1997
Imagine if Tiger Woods had to walk along the fairways at the staid Augusta National Golf Club and had to hear screams of "nigger" directed at him at every turn. Imagine if his peers voted not to play with him. Imagine Woods having to play under death threats.Could Woods have performed under such pressure? Could Woods have succeeded?If Jackie Robinson were alive today, he would be proud that this country has made enough strides to appreciate and embrace a talent like Woods, who on Sunday became the first person of African-American descent to win the Masters.
SPORTS
By JERRY BEMBRY | April 15, 1997
Imagine if Tiger Woods had to walk along the fairways at the staid Augusta National Golf Club and had to hear screams of "nigger" directed at him at every turn. Imagine if his peers voted not to play with him. Imagine Woods having to play under death threats.Could Woods have performed under such pressure? Could Woods have succeeded?If Jackie Robinson were alive today, he would be proud that this country has made enough strides to appreciate and embrace a talent like Woods, who on Sunday became the first person of African-American descent to win the Masters.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | July 6, 1992
Every night, with Ernest Tubb's immortal "Walking The Floor Over You" creating a mood, a lowly reporter paces the room, wringing hands and losing sleep over the Baltimore Orioles' chances of signing Cal Ripken Jr., the immensely gifted shortstop and finest all-around player in the team's history.The Orioles, most assuredly, should find a way to keep him in their employ until his career is over. But no reason for panic. If it doesn't happen, and Ripken exits, the franchise will not terminate.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 13, 1997
AS 50TH ANNIVERSARY celebrations go, this one is a bit of a bust. This week -- Tuesday to be exact -- marks year number 50 since Jackie Robinson broke the color line in major league baseball.That April day in 1947 has long been revered by African-Americans as a great leap forward in the integration of American sports and society, an advance for the race. It's time we start calling April 15, 1947 what it actually was: an execrable and egregious insult.This is meant as no disrespect for Robinson, who was a superb athlete, a dignified, intelligent man who handled everything that was thrown at him with grace and courage.
SPORTS
June 22, 1995
Syd Thrift, Orioles director of player developmentThe five best baseball minds since his involvement in professional baseball began in 1949.1. Branch Rickey Sr., former Brooklyn Dodgers and St. Louis Cardinals general manager. "He was in a class all by himself as a visionary, yet practical. He saw things way into the future."2. Branch Rickey Jr., former Pittsburgh Pirates executive. "Sharp baseball mind with great feelings, empathy for people."3. Ewing Kauffman, former Kansas City Royals owner.
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