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By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 4, 1994
PHILADELPHIA -- Philadelphia Eagles owner Norman Braman made new financial demands on Hollywood producer Jeffrey Lurie late last week that have sent Lurie's negotiators scurrying to close the deal to buy the team, sources said.It is unclear whether Braman's latest moves are merely a last-minute negotiating tactic or whether they are designed to scuttle the deal.Lurie, sources said, still plans to be in Philadelphia tomorrow or Wednesday, when he expects Braman to sign an agreement to sell the Eagles for $185 million, the highest amount ever paid for an NFL team.
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NEWS
April 20, 2007
On April 16, 2007, JOHN, beloved son of Dorothy Piazza (nee Curran), beloved father of Sandra Braman, grandfather of Christopher and Phillip Braman. He is also survived by three brothers, three sisters and many nieces and nephews. Services at Brooklyn Park Church of the United Brethren, 201 W. Hilltop Rd, 21225 on Saturday, April 21 at 2pm.
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SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,Staff Writer | July 21, 1993
"The main objective is not for you to leave here as Michael Jordan."Buzz Braman makes sure everyone sitting on the gymnasium floor at Arundel High School understands this point. The boys and girls who paid $142 each to attend his week-long instructional camp aren't destined to become gravity-defying, soft drink-endorsing millionaires.But they can learn a thing or two about shooting a basketball. Straight, and with the proper touch. And that should be enough to satisfy anyone who has ever taken aim at a rim and swore that it moved.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | May 7, 2006
Does confronting one's 40th birthday mean it's time to face the music? For the Shriver Hall Concert Series, that certainly was the case. And board chair Jephta Drachman decided to take the phrase literally. She called the organization's anniversary gala "Face the Music," and asked artists and VIPs to decorate masks to be auctioned off at the party. "Two years ago, when we started, we didn't think we'd get 50 masks," Drachman explained. "Then, it started to snowball, and we ended up with more than 150."
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | April 10, 1994
Now that Norman Braman has agreed to sell the Philadelphia Eagles, there's still one football game he's eager to see: the first game played in Baltimore by the city's NFL team.Braman isn't deterred by the fact that Baltimore doesn't have an NFL team. He promised last January that the city will get one and he said last week that he still thinks it's going to happen."I still think Baltimore is going to wind up with a team. I hope I'm right. When that day happens and that first game occurs, I'll be there.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | July 26, 1995
Sensitivity toward those he's coaching, respect for their abilities and an almost Einstein-like understanding of his playful subject matter -- shooting a basketball -- have made Buzz Braman a one-of-a-kind instructor, in a class by himself.He's known as the "shot doctor," a specialist in counseling a pro player on how best to utilize his potential in putting a ball through the hoop or helping find his way out of a slump. And, from another aspect, he provides the same service for children attempting to develop their own feel in delivering a shot.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan | December 24, 1993
The Baltimore Colts' Band -- which for nine years has provided the musical score to the city's mournful loss of the team -- will play Sunday at the Philadelphia Eagles' game, honoring Norman Braman, the only team owner to vote in favor of Baltimore's NFL expansion bid.The band this year performed its 30th NFL halftime show since the 1984 move of the Colts to Indianapolis. The performance in Philadelphia for the Eagles-New Orleans Saints game was set up in September, before the league's awarding of expansion franchises to Charlotte, N.C., and Jacksonville, Fla."
SPORTS
By Bill Lyon and Bill Lyon,Knight-Ridder News Service bTC | March 6, 1994
PHILADELPHIA -- Norman Braman would be better off without the Philadelphia Eagles.And vice versa.So it would be beneficial to all around if Braman sells the team.The sooner the better.If not to Jeffrey Lurie, the minor-league Hollywood producer and reputed tire-kicker whose dreams apparently exceed his financial reach, then to the next serious suitor with the checkbook and the clout to match his mouth.The city long ago wearied of Braman.And his contempt for Philadelphia, in turn, is undisguised.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | December 29, 1993
When men stand up to be counted, even if the votes are stacked against them, it suggests old-fashioned values. . . such basic qualities as loyalty-to-a-purpose, credibility and respect. Unfortunately, the ruthless National Football League, especially its commissioner, has a difficult time recognizing those characteristics.It's this prevailing condition that has allowed Norman Braman, owner of the Philadelphia Eagles, to emerge as a new folk hero in Baltimore. The fact remains Braman was the lone voice going down with the ship.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | December 27, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- Plans went strangely awry for the Baltimore Colts' Band when, for the first time since being organized in 1947, it was prevented from fulfilling an engagement. Reason: Iced out.It wasn't because their lips were frozen to their instruments, but road conditions yesterday morning created conditions that made too precarious for the trip here from Baltimore even to be attempted.L The 147-piece aggregation was advised to cancel the mission.Musicians, color guard and flag-line members were isolated in their homes and slick highways kept them from meeting their chartered buses for the 6:30 a.m. departure for Philadelphia and a 10 o'clock rehearsal at Veterans Stadium.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 19, 2003
Basketball shooting guru Buzz Braman had a busy schedule last weekend. On Saturday, he was to work with J.P. Ventura, 13, in Columbia. On Sunday morning, he flew to California for his next client, the Sacramento Kings' Chris Webber. But that is what a typical Braman schedule looks like. He works with anyone interested in improving his or her shooting. A former NBA assistant coach with Orlando, Washington and Philadelphia, Braman still works with the big names such as Webber and Penny Hardaway.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2000
Keenan McCardell has been around long enough to know what it means when a team takes a player in the first round at your position. "They're sending a message," the Jacksonville Jaguars' wide receiver said of the team's selection of wide receiver R.Jay Soward in the first round. The Jaguars say there was no message and they took Soward as their third receiver because McCardell and Jimmy Smith get so much double coverage. The Tennessee Titans beat them three times last year basically by double-covering both receivers and stifling the Jaguars' potent passing game.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1995
BOWIE -- If you were a close observer of last year's NBA Finals, you know of Buzz Braman. The self-proclaimed "shot doctor," Braman was the man standing along a ramp watching with interest every time Shaquille O'Neal stepped to the free-throw line.Braman, over the years, has built his reputation as one of the game's top shooting instructors. The Bullets, in recent years, have developed a reputation of not knocking down the open shot (sixth from last in three-point shooting last year). So it should be no surprise that the team has hired Braman as its full-time shooting instructor.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | July 26, 1995
Sensitivity toward those he's coaching, respect for their abilities and an almost Einstein-like understanding of his playful subject matter -- shooting a basketball -- have made Buzz Braman a one-of-a-kind instructor, in a class by himself.He's known as the "shot doctor," a specialist in counseling a pro player on how best to utilize his potential in putting a ball through the hoop or helping find his way out of a slump. And, from another aspect, he provides the same service for children attempting to develop their own feel in delivering a shot.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Sun Staff Writer | July 10, 1994
BOWIE -- There was no hesitation for Mitchell Butler as he caught passes during a shooting drill, and no hitch as he released his jumper.More often than not, his jumpers hit the bottom of the net -- some feat for a player who brought on nervous responses any time he put up anything other than a layup last season for the Washington Bullets."
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | April 10, 1994
Now that Norman Braman has agreed to sell the Philadelphia Eagles, there's still one football game he's eager to see: the first game played in Baltimore by the city's NFL team.Braman isn't deterred by the fact that Baltimore doesn't have an NFL team. He promised last January that the city will get one and he said last week that he still thinks it's going to happen."I still think Baltimore is going to wind up with a team. I hope I'm right. When that day happens and that first game occurs, I'll be there.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1995
BOWIE -- If you were a close observer of last year's NBA Finals, you know of Buzz Braman. The self-proclaimed "shot doctor," Braman was the man standing along a ramp watching with interest every time Shaquille O'Neal stepped to the free-throw line.Braman, over the years, has built his reputation as one of the game's top shooting instructors. The Bullets, in recent years, have developed a reputation of not knocking down the open shot (sixth from last in three-point shooting last year). So it should be no surprise that the team has hired Braman as its full-time shooting instructor.
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 4, 1994
PHILADELPHIA -- Philadelphia Eagles owner Norman Braman made new financial demands on Hollywood producer Jeffrey Lurie late last week that have sent Lurie's negotiators scurrying to close the deal to buy the team, sources said.It is unclear whether Braman's latest moves are merely a last-minute negotiating tactic or whether they are designed to scuttle the deal.Lurie, sources said, still plans to be in Philadelphia tomorrow or Wednesday, when he expects Braman to sign an agreement to sell the Eagles for $185 million, the highest amount ever paid for an NFL team.
SPORTS
By S.A. Paolantonio and Tim Panaccio and S.A. Paolantonio and Tim Panaccio,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | March 31, 1994
PHILADELPHIA -- Don't fret, Philadelphia Eagles fans.When he buys the team for $185 million, Hollywood producer Jeffrey Lurie will have plenty of money left to invest in players, facilities and the front office to keep the Eagles a strong force in the highly competitive NFC East.That's what Lurie's Boston-based financial adviser, Ed Rudman, said yesterday, confirming that the sale of the team by Norman Braman, a Miami car dealer, was imminent."The people of Philadelphia will not have to worry," Rudman said.
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