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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 15, 1998
The century-old Dracula legend has all but achieved theatrical immortality, reincarnated in various guises, from the 1931 horror movie with Bella Lugosi to the recent Gothic romance with Gary Oldman.Now comes the Pasadena Theatre Company and its production of Bram Stoker's "Dracula" in the Humanities Recital Hall at Anne Arundel Community College on weekends this month.The story remains romantic, but what decades ago was sexual innuendo has become more explicit. The vampire sets about seducing the sanitarium owner's daughter, and she seduces her suitor to learn his secrets.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
At the start of Bram Stoker's 1897 novel "Dracula," a London lawyer named Harker visits Transylvania to facilitate a real estate deal for a mysterious count who desires new digs in England. Not anything freshly built, or even modestly rehabbed, mind you. Something old and crumbling will do fine, along the lines of the count's longtime castle, with its "dark window openings" and "frowning walls" that form "a jagged line against the sky. " Harker has found just the thing, he tells the count, an "ancient structure, built of heavy stones," a property that "has not been repaired for a large number of years" and has many trees that "make it in places gloomy.
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1995
OK, OK, the small screen will diminish the mood, and Halloween was last week. But "Bram Stoker's Dracula," the Fox Tuesday movie, nonetheless marks one of Hollywood's most lavish treatments of the vampire legend.* "Celebrity Jeopardy" (7:30 p.m.-8 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- The nightly quiz show's third annual tournament unfolds all week, with celebrities playing to raise money for their favorite charities. On the buzzers tonight: LeVar Burton ("Reading Rainbow"), Melody Thomas Scott ("The Young and the Restless")
TRAVEL
October 22, 2000
A turn for the better A MEMORABLE PLACE By Davida Gypsy Breier When my best friend and I traveled to the United Kingdom last January, we had no set itinerary -- just a car, a map, a little money and 12 days. We started out in London, went south to Brighton, east to Dover, and on the sixth day found ourselves driving north through the legendary moors. As we left breathtaking North York Moors National Park, we were faced with turning left and heading inland or turning right and driving toward the coast.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 22, 1995
Maybe this film should be called "Mel Brooks, Dead and Loving It."Written off by a generation of movie critics that thinks "Nixon" is a great movie, he's recovered enough of the form that made him so beloved in the '70s and '80s. No one in any semblance of a right mind would confuse "Dracula, Dead and Loving It" with "Young Frankenstein" or "The Producers," but it's easily his best movie since then.Brooks seems to have made up his mind who he is. He's not imitating his imitators any more, he's back to imitating himself, always a sound career move.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 1997
The first thing you need for a story ballet is a compelling reason to tell the story in dance.This is not the only element missing from Ballet Theater of Annapolis' "Dracula," but it's the most important one.For much of the new ballet, created in observance of the 100th anniversary of Bram Stoker's Victorian thriller, choreographer Edward Stewart hasn't made enough dance steps to fill up the music. Nor has he paid very much attention to the novel, as you can tell from such gaffes as Dracula's death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 13, 1992
"Bram Stoker's Dracula" is about the naked and the dead -- together, at last. Opulent and lustrous, it never makes much sense at the character level, but glistens with such dark, carbuncular magnificence and is fueled by such an elixir of sexual yearning that I defy any manjack among you to deny its murky tidal pull. In fact you could say that in his quest for visual glory, Francis Ford Coppola has left no baroque unturned and Klimt every mountain -- Gustav Klimt's baroque art nouveau genius seems to irradiate the movie.
NEWS
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the sun | April 14, 1996
"Bram Stoker: A Biography of the Author of Dracula," by Barbara Belford, Knopf, 384 pages, $30 For nearly 100 years, the world has assumed that Bram Stoker's "Dracula" is merely an escapist work of supernatural lust and violence, but Barbara Belford's biography of Stoker completely alters our understanding of the classic tale. Her extensive research in archives on both sides of the Atlantic has opened up a fascinating autobiographical dimension to the book, one that helps to explain not only the powerful appeal of the nocturnal Count but also the strange character of his creator.
TRAVEL
October 22, 2000
A turn for the better A MEMORABLE PLACE By Davida Gypsy Breier When my best friend and I traveled to the United Kingdom last January, we had no set itinerary -- just a car, a map, a little money and 12 days. We started out in London, went south to Brighton, east to Dover, and on the sixth day found ourselves driving north through the legendary moors. As we left breathtaking North York Moors National Park, we were faced with turning left and heading inland or turning right and driving toward the coast.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 20, 1992
He's back. And this time he just doesn't want your blood. He wants your money, too.And you're giving it to him.Francis Ford Coppola's "Bram Stoker's 'Dracula'" sucked in over $30 million in its first weekend of release, making it one of the largest film openings of the year. It's too soon to tell if the movie will continue to generate ticket sales at this pace (my hunch is that it won't), but even if it doesn't, it's sure to make $100 million and therefore nudge past the magic threshold of "hit."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 16, 2000
A few weeks ago, a treasured friend, with a busy, cultured life, faced terrifying surgery and, at best, a long immobilizing recovery. Visiting my house a few days before that, she pleaded, "I need major anesthetic distraction." My library is jumbled, sketchy, ravaged by too many moves and unredeemed loans. There are more or less 2,200 volumes, dating back to childhood and school days. Relatively few are new. I am forever going back and dipping into books. This I know: Reading is civilization's grandest palliative against fear and anxiety.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 15, 1998
The century-old Dracula legend has all but achieved theatrical immortality, reincarnated in various guises, from the 1931 horror movie with Bella Lugosi to the recent Gothic romance with Gary Oldman.Now comes the Pasadena Theatre Company and its production of Bram Stoker's "Dracula" in the Humanities Recital Hall at Anne Arundel Community College on weekends this month.The story remains romantic, but what decades ago was sexual innuendo has become more explicit. The vampire sets about seducing the sanitarium owner's daughter, and she seduces her suitor to learn his secrets.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 1997
The first thing you need for a story ballet is a compelling reason to tell the story in dance.This is not the only element missing from Ballet Theater of Annapolis' "Dracula," but it's the most important one.For much of the new ballet, created in observance of the 100th anniversary of Bram Stoker's Victorian thriller, choreographer Edward Stewart hasn't made enough dance steps to fill up the music. Nor has he paid very much attention to the novel, as you can tell from such gaffes as Dracula's death.
NEWS
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the sun | April 14, 1996
"Bram Stoker: A Biography of the Author of Dracula," by Barbara Belford, Knopf, 384 pages, $30 For nearly 100 years, the world has assumed that Bram Stoker's "Dracula" is merely an escapist work of supernatural lust and violence, but Barbara Belford's biography of Stoker completely alters our understanding of the classic tale. Her extensive research in archives on both sides of the Atlantic has opened up a fascinating autobiographical dimension to the book, one that helps to explain not only the powerful appeal of the nocturnal Count but also the strange character of his creator.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 22, 1995
Maybe this film should be called "Mel Brooks, Dead and Loving It."Written off by a generation of movie critics that thinks "Nixon" is a great movie, he's recovered enough of the form that made him so beloved in the '70s and '80s. No one in any semblance of a right mind would confuse "Dracula, Dead and Loving It" with "Young Frankenstein" or "The Producers," but it's easily his best movie since then.Brooks seems to have made up his mind who he is. He's not imitating his imitators any more, he's back to imitating himself, always a sound career move.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1995
OK, OK, the small screen will diminish the mood, and Halloween was last week. But "Bram Stoker's Dracula," the Fox Tuesday movie, nonetheless marks one of Hollywood's most lavish treatments of the vampire legend.* "Celebrity Jeopardy" (7:30 p.m.-8 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- The nightly quiz show's third annual tournament unfolds all week, with celebrities playing to raise money for their favorite charities. On the buzzers tonight: LeVar Burton ("Reading Rainbow"), Melody Thomas Scott ("The Young and the Restless")
FEATURES
By Nancy Pate and Nancy Pate,Orlando Sentinel | October 30, 1994
Forget the wooden stake. Don't bother with the crucifix or worry with the holy water. As for the garlic, it's just going to make people turn up their noses at you.Face it -- there's no protection from vampires this year. The immortal bloodsuckers have turned into popular-culture leeches. No need to travel to Transylvania. They're hanging out at the movies, on television, at the bookstores, in role-playing games and comic books. And as Halloween approaches, along with the premiere next month of the film adaptation of Anne Rice's "Interview With the Vampire," fang fever is at a peak.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 16, 2000
A few weeks ago, a treasured friend, with a busy, cultured life, faced terrifying surgery and, at best, a long immobilizing recovery. Visiting my house a few days before that, she pleaded, "I need major anesthetic distraction." My library is jumbled, sketchy, ravaged by too many moves and unredeemed loans. There are more or less 2,200 volumes, dating back to childhood and school days. Relatively few are new. I am forever going back and dipping into books. This I know: Reading is civilization's grandest palliative against fear and anxiety.
FEATURES
By Allen Barra and Allen Barra,Special to The Sun | November 13, 1994
Neil Jordan won a Best Screenplay Oscar two years ago for "The Crying Game." He will not win his second for "Interview With the Vampire." Best Director, perhaps. But Jordan's name, which along with Anne Rice's was on an early print of the film under "screenplay by," is not on the print at theaters all over the world. "It's a thing with the Writers Guild," is all Jordan will say.However, Neil Jordan's signature is on every frame of "Interview With the Vampire." He underlines it in a scene where a journalist (Christian Slater)
FEATURES
By Nancy Pate and Nancy Pate,Orlando Sentinel | October 30, 1994
Forget the wooden stake. Don't bother with the crucifix or worry with the holy water. As for the garlic, it's just going to make people turn up their noses at you.Face it -- there's no protection from vampires this year. The immortal bloodsuckers have turned into popular-culture leeches. No need to travel to Transylvania. They're hanging out at the movies, on television, at the bookstores, in role-playing games and comic books. And as Halloween approaches, along with the premiere next month of the film adaptation of Anne Rice's "Interview With the Vampire," fang fever is at a peak.
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