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NEWS
February 15, 1992
Government isn't known for being at top of the responsiveness curve. But the Schaefer administration has hit the mark by relaxing income and price margins on the well-known but lately underutilized Maryland Mortgage Program to accelerate housing demand from first-time homebuyers.Under the temporary adjustments, individuals or families making $47,100 can qualify for 8 percent mortgages on homes up to $124,875. The income cut-off was previously $32,000 for single purchasers and $40,000 for families.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | July 23, 2013
Now that Baltimore City's former Barclay Recreation Center has reopened as a privately run community center, residents are figuring out what to do with it. Toward that end, 30 people gathered on July 16 at the newly named 29th Street Community Center to brainstorm ideas for programming at the building, 300 W. 29th St., and how to pay for it. The meeting was sponsored by the nonprofit Greater Homewood Community Corp., which now runs the center...
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NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
A group of Howard County students and staff members weighed in on school safety at a statewide summit held last week in Greenbelt. The group, made up of seven students and four staff members from various county schools, spent the day brainstorming ways to thwart violence in schools. The event was organized Rep. Elijah E. Cummings and state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick. Adejire Bademosi, Howard County's student member of the school board, said the summit was valuable. "We get an opportunity to talk," she said.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | November 4, 2009
Dave Troy has been on a mission the past two years or so to jump-start the Baltimore region's entrepreneurial and creative spirits. He's helped coordinate and organize several innovative, techie-related conferences during that time, but the most ambitious one yet will kick off Thursday. Wanting to prove that the Mid-Atlantic region can be a haven for ideas, Troy and a group of 110 or so volunteers have put together one of the area's largest free conferences of the year. It's called TEDxMidAtlantic, and it will be held at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | December 11, 1991
A town without cars?Unlikely, yes, but not impossible -- not when everything is possible.For the first time since it was organized in April, the committeeplanning a new Odenton will try to come up with a vision of what theWest County community should look like 20 years from now."We want to remove the focus from what's wrong and try to put the focus on envisioning what is possible," said Bruce Galloway, a consultant hiredby the county to oversee the design of Odenton Town Center, a 218-acre site at routes 32 and 175.The committee -- residents, developers and county planners -- hopes to draft rules by July 1992 for developers who want to build in the town center.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1997
How does a region with no regional government talk to itself? How can localities tame problems that scorn political boundaries? What are the common interests of a Carroll County farmer and a Dundalk steel worker?Nobody knows, precisely. But 200 of metro Baltimore's brightest and best took a loosely organized stab yesterday, not at answering the questions, but at figuring out whether they're the right questions and how to continue discussing them."There Are No Boundaries," said the placard at the regional forum sponsored yesterday by the Baltimore Metropolitan Council and the Greater Baltimore Committee.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2000
An ambitious effort to revitalize Baltimore's Jones Falls Valley moves into high gear this weekend, as more than 100 community leaders, business owners, architects, environmentalists and others gather to begin mapping the area's future. Participants will meet Saturday for a five-hour charette, or intensive brainstorming session, to generate design ideas for up to 15 areas along a four-mile stretch of the Jones Falls Valley, from Penn Station north to Robert E. Lee Park. The goal is to take suggestions for the diverse areas along the valley and create a master plan that can guide economic development and environmental restoration efforts over the next 40 years or more, said Al Barry of A.B. Associates, a private consulting firm that is coordinating the planning effort.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1997
People in wheelchairs who can't see obstacles or who want to play sports such as hockey may benefit from an inventors' brainstorming session June 10.Up to 80 engineers, medical specialists and disabled people are being asked to pay $75 each to gather at the Johns Hopkins University and offer their ideas.The challenge is to solve two problems for people who use wheelchairs: How to detect and avoid precipices and obstructions for those who can't see well.How to expand recreational opportunities for athletes wanting to play certain games.
NEWS
By Fay Lande | July 9, 2003
Clemens Crossing Elementary School's "Change in Direction" Destination ImagiNation team competed in the program's Global Finals tournament at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, May 21-24. The fourth- and fifth-graders tied for 19th place out of a field of 48 teams competing to solve the "Change in Direction" problem at the elementary level. The problem required them to build a product, then transport, dismantle and rebuild it into something else. The children chose to transport a camera on a little electric cart they called a "spyangle" and then rebuilt it into a working hovercraft, said parent Marion Billek.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 18, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A document obtained by the House ethics committee shows that the chief political allies of Newt Gingrich drafted a detailed plan in 1995 to impede and obscure the investigation of the House speaker by blasting the ethics of Democrats and the Clinton administration.The document, released by Maryland Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin yesterday, offers a window into private GOP discussions to diminish the Gingrich investigation, distract attention away from the speaker and onto his accusers, and resist the appointment of a special counsel.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
A group of Howard County students and staff members weighed in on school safety at a statewide summit held last week in Greenbelt. The group, made up of seven students and four staff members from various county schools, spent the day brainstorming ways to thwart violence in schools. The event was organized Rep. Elijah E. Cummings and state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick. Adejire Bademosi, Howard County's student member of the school board, said the summit was valuable. "We get an opportunity to talk," she said.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun reporter | October 7, 2007
The pairs faced each other, with clipboards and pens in hand, ready for the first round. They would have minutes to quiz each other and jot down notes, before moving on to the next person. Who are you? What organization do you represent? Whom do you serve? Ready. Set. Go. Representatives from a mix of agencies, organizations and programs were on a mission to get to know each other. The hodgepodge of individuals who usually spend their days helping Carroll County residents in such areas as literacy, violence prevention, employment or education were getting some help of their own last week, and discovering the resources that might assist them in their jobs, and thus in better serving the community.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,SUN REPORTER | January 26, 2007
The sign outside the room just a couple of doors down from the main office at Northeast High School says conference room. But everyone who has worked within the four cinder-block walls plastered with students' names, test scores and attendance data, calls it the war room. "This is a battle we're fighting ... for our children," Northeast Principal Kathryn Kubic said. On any given afternoon, you can find teachers and administrators huddling over the data. Trying to find out who missed how many days in class and why. Trying to see who needs tutoring and in what class.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2005
THEIR MISSION was to build the tallest structure possible without toppling it. But it turned out to be a sticky proposition because the fourth-graders at Friendship Valley Elementary in Westminster were working with uncooked spaghetti and marshmallows. Working in teams of four or five, the pupils carefully plotted their strategies. Twisting their bodies to get just the right angle, they gingerly connected strands of pasta with gooey white marshmallows. Amid an increasing buzz of excitement, their towers grew taller and more wobbly.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2004
The Anne Arundel County school system is exploring options to avoid installing more than 100 portable classrooms to house all the children who will attend county schools by 2007 because of all-day kindergarten and other early childhood programs. To meet state mandates, the school system planned to add 35 portable classrooms this year at 18 schools. But school officials now estimate they will need 74 additional classrooms at 26 schools over the next two years. Four schools are expected to have enough space without additions or other rooms.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF WRITER | October 13, 2004
Evelyn Inchauteguis works at the library and belongs to a book club. Hardly notable. Except that everything about those two concepts defies some hard truths about Baltimore, particularly about people who grow up as Inchauteguis did -- in foster homes, a pregnant high school dropout, eventually a single mother of two on welfare. Baltimore is a place where 38 percent of the residents read at or below the fifth-grade level and where a third of the city didn't graduate from high school. So when area politicians, business leaders, educators and nonprofit group representatives put their heads together tomorrow at Baltimore's Literacy Summit, they'll be trying to figure out how to create more people like Inchauteguis, who one day realized, "I'm not gonna make it out there without my diploma."
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | June 13, 2001
AMONG THE catalogs that came in the mail that day was one featuring Father's Day gifts. Only Father's Day gifts. It had a picture of a father and son on the cover, fishing from a row boat. Inside were many first-class, conspicuously consumptive and wholly unnecessary items to purchase as a tribute to the dad in the house. For example: a digital temperature fork for grilling; a horseshoe set made out of forged steel; a Swiss Army knife featuring a divot repairer, a spike wrench, club-face cleaner, nail file and cigar-clipper; a Coleman lantern with built-in TV, AM/FM radio and siren; a framed four-leaf clover and a monogrammed, silver-plated mouse for the computer.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | November 28, 1996
Linda Rivelis, president of Campaign Consultation Inc. and Baltimore resident for 20 years, thrives on city life, and the challenges it offers. A consultant who worked to get community approval of the Charles Village Benefits District in 1994, she has more recently worked on the Baltimore Campaign, an initiative to promote the city coordinated by the Citizens Planning and Housing Association.Accordingly, Rivelis, 45, is ready on any given day for corporate meetings and community brainstorming -- as long as the look is dynamic.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2004
An old and a new bridge span the Patapsco River, River Road and the CSX Railroad near the town of Sykesville. One opened last month and handles thousands of vehicles a day. The other dates to 1963 and sits idle, blocked from traffic and surrounded by newly seeded grass. Unusable but unique, the 294-foot-long, 48-foot-wide older bridge "is staying put," said Michael Strong, the State Highway Administration's project engineer for the bridge. The Maryland Historical Trust has deemed the 40-year- old span, with its innovative aluminum girder system, to be exceedingly rare and worthy of placement on the state's Historic Bridge Inventory.
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