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Brain Tumor

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SPORTS
By Sports Digest | February 18, 2010
Forward Marco Terminesi , the leading scorer for the Major Indoor Soccer League's Milwaukee Wave, has been placed on injured reserve as he undergoes an examination for what doctors believe could be a brain tumor. Terminesi, the league's third-leading scorer, has missed five of the Wave's past six games with nausea, headaches and symptoms of vertigo. In a letter to teammates Monday, Terminesi, 25, said doctors believe he has a tumor on the pineal gland in the center of the brain. The type of tumor and its status is unclear, he said.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital have removed a rare tumor that contained several fully grown teeth from a baby boy's brain. The tumor was found in the then-4-month-old from West Virginia in 2012 after a pediatrician noticed that his head was unusually large for his age. Doctors wrote about the findings in an article that appeared this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The discovery could someday help researchers trying to cure diseases or grow new organs, medical experts said.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital have removed a rare tumor that contained several fully grown teeth from a baby boy's brain. The tumor was found in the then-4-month-old from West Virginia in 2012 after a pediatrician noticed that his head was unusually large for his age. Doctors wrote about the findings in an article that appeared this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The discovery could someday help researchers trying to cure diseases or grow new organs, medical experts said.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
Through its partnership with the Friends of Jaclyn Foundation, the Johns Hopkins men's lacrosse team recently adopted, or "signed," Marquise Long, a dynamic 5-year-old boy with a smile that lights up a room. The foundation pairs children battling pediatric brain tumors with college and high school sports teams. The teams give these children and their families love, support and friendship as they fight the disease. Since its founding in 2005, the foundation has connected hundreds of teams with children throughout the United States and Canada.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
The first tackle that Zach Lederer absorbed on the practice field this year was so violent that it left the rest of the Centennial High School football squad wondering about his health. But it was a hit the 17-year-old senior said he needed to take, to prove to himself that his recovery was complete from a brain tumor that could have killed him. "My teammates said, 'Man that was a hard hit,'" Zach recalled. "And I said, 'If that was a hard hit, I'll be fine.' It was a great thing because it got all of my fears out of the way. " Despite concerns from his parents and one of the best doctors in the world, Zach decided he wanted to become a full-fledged member of the Eagles during his senior year after serving as the team's manager.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | April 4, 1995
Loyola College women's lacrosse coach Diane Aikens learned yesterday that the brain tumor doctors removed last Thursday was benign. Doctors said that she will leave Johns Hopkins Hospital today and will recuperate at home for an undetermined period, a Loyola spokesman said yesterday.When she first learned she would have to have surgery, Aikens, 32, said she expected to return to coach the Greyhounds in their April 11 game against George Mason. Her recovery from surgery already has gone much faster than doctors predicted.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,Sun Staff Writer | October 14, 1994
Harry Lentz of Northeast, who has more victories than any other Anne Arundel County baseball coach, has a brain tumor and is undergoing daily chemotherapy treatments.The tumor was discovered nearly two weeks ago at Johns Hopkins Hospital."I really don't expect to return to work," said Lentz, 51. "I can't do anything except take the treatments and hope for the best. About a week ago, I was still jogging and lifting weights, but I can't do those things now. Not much I can do."Lentz was at his vacation home in the Pennsylvania mountains a couple weeks ago when he experienced difficulty with his left hand and left foot.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
Through its partnership with the Friends of Jaclyn Foundation, the Johns Hopkins men's lacrosse team recently adopted, or "signed," Marquise Long, a dynamic 5-year-old boy with a smile that lights up a room. The foundation pairs children battling pediatric brain tumors with college and high school sports teams. The teams give these children and their families love, support and friendship as they fight the disease. Since its founding in 2005, the foundation has connected hundreds of teams with children throughout the United States and Canada.
SPORTS
By New York Daily News | August 2, 1994
NEW YORK -- Outfielder Joe Orsulak returned to a somber New York Mets clubhouse yesterday after spending the past five days at home with his wife, Adrianna, who has a malignant brain tumor.Adrianna Orsulak, 29, will undergo further tests before doctors determine her course of treatment."If she needed me home I'd be there," Orsulak told a small group of reporters before the game. "All I can do is go to work and take care of business. It's a tough time. We just have to deal with it."We have a positive attitude.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 19, 2001
"THIS IS LIKE a slap in the world's face," was all Kayleen Weinman-Clute could say when told that her 25-year-old friend, Henry Bundy III of Severna Park, had been diagnosed with an inoperable, malignant brain tumor. Weinman-Clute, a pediatric nurse-practitioner, describes herself as a regular patron of the Chesapeake Bagel Bakery in Severna Park's Park Plaza shopping center on Ritchie Highway. That's where Bundy conducted what best can be described as daily seminars on good customer relations.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
Aberdeen Dive Team coach Rick Culbertson received the first John E. Smith "Excellence in Coaching Award" for the Central Maryland Dive League. The award was created this year in memory of John E. Smith, who died earlier this year from a brain tumor. Smith was a former diver at the University of Maryland and the head coach for the Frederick Dive Team for more than 20 years. He had a major impact on the lives of many kids by introducing them to the sport of diving. Culbertson was chosen for the award for his efforts in bringing the sport of diving to Harford County five years ago, his excellent teaching and coaching skills and building a competitive team.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
Displaying his characteristic courage, Zach Lederer bravely attempts to recreate the notorious strongman pose - biceps flexed and fists clenched - that turned a 2012 photo of his steely-eyed resolve to fight cancer into an Internet craze called "Zaching. " But debilitating weakness on the left side of his body, caused by swelling on the right side of his brain after treatment for a third brain tumor, has left him unable to raise his atrophied left arm above his chest. The pose may not be possible right now, but the spirit behind it remains steadfast.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2013
Paul Edward Kennedy Mullan, a photographer who made headlines as a foundling discovered in a Towson apartment vestibule, died of a brain tumor Feb. 27 at his parents' North Baltimore home. He was 34. The story of his first days filled news columns in January 1979. The Sun reported he was discovered near the vestibule mailboxes of a Towson garden apartment near Towson University. Days old, he was wrapped in a plaid blanket and dressed in a J.C. Penney shirt and a diaper held together with Scotch tape.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
Sometimes it's easy for Vincent Vono to feel down about having to live with Parkinson's disease. The disease has snatched his independence and sense of a normal life. The 76-year-old stopped driving last year as his motor skills slowed. He doesn't cook much because it is too exhausting to clean up afterward. Even a short walk across his tiny apartment is a task some days. But for all the disease has taken away from Vono, it has fostered and strengthened a love for art that first developed when he was a boy. Painting is the one thing that still comes easily to Vono.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
I did not think I'd ever see a better medical documentary series than the Emmy-Award-winning “Hopkins 24/7” that aired in 2000 or its sequel, “Hopkins,” which won a Peabody Award in 2008. The backstage access, immediacy and range of gripping real-life drama that ABCNews Executive Producer Terence Wrong and his team captured at Baltimore's world-renowned medical institution were landmark. But with “NY Med,” which premieres at 10 p.m. Tuesday, Wrong surpasses his earlier work in terms of prime-time storytelling without sacrificing any of the cultural seriousness or grand reach of the Hopkins series.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2011
William John Nauman Jr., a retired Verizon quality manager, died Nov. 17 of a brain tumor at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 78. The son of a Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. lineman and a homemaker, he was born in Baltimore and raised on Beaumont Avenue in Govans. He attended the old Mount Washington Country School and graduated in 1951 from Polytechnic Institute. He served in the Marine Corps from 1955 to 1962, where he was a member of the ceremonial presidential honor guard in Washington, and attained the rank of corporal.
NEWS
By Sheila Hotchkin and Sheila Hotchkin,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 20, 1998
The sudden death of a University of Maryland student three weeks ago was caused by a malignant brain tumor that interrupted her breathing and heartbeat, the state medical examiner has said.Kelly Elizabeth Nalwasky, 20, found in her College Park dorm room Jan. 29 by her identical twin, died from astrocytoma, the most common category of brain tumor, according to a press release issued Wednesday.According to the medical examiner, that type of tumor is very fTC uncommon in young adults and it is even more unusual for sudden death to result.
NEWS
By Staff Report | September 5, 1993
There will be a "Motorcycle Ride-A-Thon" to raise money for research on childhood brain tumors at 10 a.m. Sept. 12, starting at the Mall in Columbia in Howard County. Registration begins at 7 a.m.The ride will begin in Columbia and end at the fairgrounds in Frederick.The convoy, expected to have scores of motorcycles, will be escorted by police along Route 29 to Route 216, Route 108 to Route 32, then on Interstate 70 into Frederick.Its estimated time of arrival in Carroll County, in the Mount Airy area, will be around 10:30 a.m.Now entering its 10th year, the national Ride For Kids program was started by Atlanta native Mike Traynor.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2011
Baltimore resident Sean Harris has grown accustomed to seeing doctors and staff at the Children's Hospital at Sinai; they've provided care for his 3-year-old son, Sean Jr., who in March was diagnosed with a brain tumor. On Sunday morning, Harris and his extended family took part in Sinai's seventh annual Race for Our Kids. The family met up with pediatric oncologist Yoram Unguru, who is currently treating Sean Jr.'s brain tumor. It turned out to be a family gathering - of wives, siblings, aunts, cousins, children, siblings and children.
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