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Brain Surgery

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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
When Liane Lefever complained to her doctor about a persistent ear ache, an examination found a much more serious problem: a brain tumor. For many Americans, that diagnosis could have led to invasive surgery — including slicing open her skull — and a long recovery. But with an innovative procedure being pioneered by two doctors from Johns Hopkins Hospital, her tumor was removed through a small incision in her eyelid. "When you tell people you had brain surgery, the first thing people always do is look for a scar, and that's what's amazing, there isn't one," said Lefever, 47, who lives in Manheim, Pa. "Anyone who needs to go through this should know it's not that big of a deal even if it sounds like it is."
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SPORTS
By Jon Fogg and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
UPDATE -- Oct. 1 Jack McGlone wrote on his blog Monday that his brother Bill has been diagnosed with neurosarcoidosis , a rare condition causing inflammation in the brain, spinal cord and other areas of the nervous system. No exact cause is known for sarcoidosis, including the neurological variety that Bill McGlone has. Generally, doctors think neurosarcoidosis might have a genetic link, according to MedLine Plus , and they also suspect that bacterial or viral infections, or contact with certain types of chemicals or dust, could trigger it. In an update over the weekend, Jack said doctors at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia had "pretty much ruled out" cancer after a biopsy of a mass found on his brain during a CT scan.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1994
Brain surgery on Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden is over and "went very well," according to an announcement at a County Council meeting today.County Administrative Officer Mereen E. Kelly made the announcement as the council met to formally adopt a $1.26 billion budget.Mr. Kelly said the county executive is "in intensive care and resting comfortably." Mr. Hayden, 49, entered Johns Hopkins Hospital under an assumed name Sunday for an operation to remove malformed blood vessels from his brain, a hospital spokeswoman said yesterday.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
A former Navy football player whose career was ended prematurely after he sustained a brain injury in a car accident said Monday night that he plans to come to Baltimore next week to comfort a former teammate who is now in a coma after brain surgery Saturday. Freshman slotback Will McKamey collapsed during a noncontact practice in Annapolis and was flown by medical helicopter to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he underwent surgery to relieve a blood clot on his brain. McKamey, who is from Knoxville, Tenn., has shown “little response” since then, according to his parents.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 29, 1992
Andrea Allen, the 10-year-old girl from Rochester, N.Y., whose dog, Pepper, was flown here to help cheer her before brain surgery, was reported in good condition today.She was recovering in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Johns Hopkins Hospital after a 5 1/2 -hour operation yesterday."We feel we got most of the tumor and . . . we're optimistic about Andrea's future," said her neurosurgeon, Dr. Benjamin Carson.The girl was expected to remain hospitalized for about a week if no complications arise.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1994
Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden arrives a bit later in the morning, but his workdays have been stretching into nights again.He returned to work part time last week after brain surgery May 23 but is now working virtually full-time a week ahead of schedule and, Mr. Hayden said, he's not feeling fatigued."
NEWS
By Noam N. Levey and Noam N. Levey,Los Angeles Times | December 16, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Democratic Sen. Tim Johnson, whose emergency brain surgery earlier this week raised the prospect of a shift in power in the Senate, showed signs of recovery yesterday, his office reported. Considering the seriousness of the medical problem found in his brain, "his progress is encouraging," Dr. Anthony Caputy said in a statement released by the lawmaker's staff. Caputy was a member of the team that operated on the 59-year-old South Dakotan on Wednesday night. Johnson was experiencing post-surgery swelling in his brain, but that was considered routine.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2001
It was quietly growing in 18-year-old Robyn Kirby's brain for years, maybe even for most of her life, while she mothered her younger cousins, shouted from the lifeguard chair and banged hockey sticks on Catonsville streets with neighborhood boys. By the time doctors discovered Kirby's brain tumor in December, it was bigger than a baseball. Most of these tumors are detected much earlier because they cause symptoms. But somehow, despite her tumor's size, this athletic teen never had a seizure, never slurred a word.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1996
Hugs shared, prayers said, Diane Aikens is wheeled into the operating room at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Brain surgery awaits. A medical team hovers over the patient, prepping her for the five-hour ordeal. The room is bright, cold, quiet. Too quiet, Aikens decides.Before nodding off, she summons her strength and, with impeccable timing, delivers the punch line:"All my life, people have been trying to see what's been going on inside my head, and now you guys get to do it."One year later, Aikens says she can still hear the nurses laughing beneath their surgical masks.
NEWS
June 7, 2009
EUGENE J. ROLES passed on June 1, 2009 from complications after brain surgery. A Memorial Service will be held on June 9 at 6p.m. at the Eastern United Methodist Church, located at 1429 E. North Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21213.
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer | February 10, 2012
Torrey Smith's doing it. Dane Cook's doing it. Your esteemed representatives in the Maryland House of Delegates are probably doing it, too.  “Zaching,” Zach Lederer's defiant strongman pose in the face of two brain tumors that have nearly cost him his life, has become Maryland's answer to “Tebowing,” and the wave of biceps-flexing mania is even finding its way overseas. Lederer, a freshman at Maryland who joined the Centennial High football team just six years after undergoing brain surgery and having to re-learn motor skills as basic as walking, posted yesterday on his Twitter that “Zaching is spreading like crazy through Russia and Greece.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2011
A story in a motorcycle trade paper started Bob Henig on his 20-year crusade to help children overcome a deadly disease that attacks 11 of them in the U.S. daily. The children's stories of coping, surviving and sometimes succumbing have kept him riding to raise money to battle pediatric brain cancer. He will be on the road Sunday, leading a charity drive of about 400 motorcyclists that will likely surpass the $3 million milestone in local funds raised for the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation.
EXPLORE
By Pat van den Beemt | August 15, 2011
I don't normally attend Eagle Scout ceremonies. The North County News runs announcements of new Eagle Scouts and their photos in the paper, so the scouts get their much-deserved press without me showing up at their official Eagle Court of Honor. But I went to Dylan Norwood's ceremony last night. You see, Dylan is one special scout. I got to know him earlier this year when he was the subject of a cover story. He had half his brain removed when he was just 2 years old by Dr. Ben Carson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 8, 2011
The wacko conspiracy theories perpetrated against President Barack Obama have reached a new height.  Apparently unsatisfied with simply questioning the country of the president's birth, crazy people calling themselves "conservatives" are now suggesting the president had some kind of secret brain surgery, like he's the Manchurian Candidate.  The website Escapetyranny.com, which bills itself a "social network and forum for conservatives," has...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
When Liane Lefever complained to her doctor about a persistent ear ache, an examination found a much more serious problem: a brain tumor. For many Americans, that diagnosis could have led to invasive surgery — including slicing open her skull — and a long recovery. But with an innovative procedure being pioneered by two doctors from Johns Hopkins Hospital, her tumor was removed through a small incision in her eyelid. "When you tell people you had brain surgery, the first thing people always do is look for a scar, and that's what's amazing, there isn't one," said Lefever, 47, who lives in Manheim, Pa. "Anyone who needs to go through this should know it's not that big of a deal even if it sounds like it is."
NEWS
June 7, 2009
EUGENE J. ROLES passed on June 1, 2009 from complications after brain surgery. A Memorial Service will be held on June 9 at 6p.m. at the Eastern United Methodist Church, located at 1429 E. North Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21213.
EXPLORE
By Pat van den Beemt | August 15, 2011
I don't normally attend Eagle Scout ceremonies. The North County News runs announcements of new Eagle Scouts and their photos in the paper, so the scouts get their much-deserved press without me showing up at their official Eagle Court of Honor. But I went to Dylan Norwood's ceremony last night. You see, Dylan is one special scout. I got to know him earlier this year when he was the subject of a cover story. He had half his brain removed when he was just 2 years old by Dr. Ben Carson.
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer | February 10, 2012
Torrey Smith's doing it. Dane Cook's doing it. Your esteemed representatives in the Maryland House of Delegates are probably doing it, too.  “Zaching,” Zach Lederer's defiant strongman pose in the face of two brain tumors that have nearly cost him his life, has become Maryland's answer to “Tebowing,” and the wave of biceps-flexing mania is even finding its way overseas. Lederer, a freshman at Maryland who joined the Centennial High football team just six years after undergoing brain surgery and having to re-learn motor skills as basic as walking, posted yesterday on his Twitter that “Zaching is spreading like crazy through Russia and Greece.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,edward.lee@baltsun.com | April 16, 2009
At the age of 22, Brendan Flanagan felt as though he were 90. A day after undergoing surgery in September 2007 to remove a brain tumor, Flanagan tried to walk from his bed to the bathroom at the hospital at New York University. A simple step took unbelievable effort. "I was so unbalanced that I walked like a 90-year-old man," recalled Flanagan, who could not lift anything heavier than a 5-pound weight for a month and was barred from physical activity for two months. "I remember the first time I got out of bed, I thought, 'Oh, I'm an athlete.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | April 24, 2008
Listen to your body. Get a doctor you really like and trust. Stop smoking. Jayne Miller smiles and laughs at her newfound mantras, truisms she's learned the hard way during the past two months. Hers is a good, hearty laugh, one that betrays not a hint of anything wrong - she neither looks nor sounds like a woman still recovering from brain surgery. Sitting on a picnic bench outside WBAL's TV Hill studios on a warm April afternoon, she seems as energetic and straightforward as ever, every inch the hard-driving investigative reporter who has been chasing after lying pols and corrupt businessmen for nearly three decades.
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