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By Jeff D. Opdyke and Jeff D. Opdyke,Orange County Register | February 3, 1992
COSTA MESA, Calif. -- Masoud Karkehabadi is dazzled by the mysteries of the brain, excited at the thought of a career spent unraveling its intricacies. The pre-med student knows he has the mind for it: He tutors other students in algebra and upper-division anatomy.But it's the childhood fantasies of "Peter Pan" that bring fire to his eyes.At 10 years old, Masoud is a genius wrapped in the body of a boy.His IQ rests somewhere above 200, and as a sophomore at Orange Coast College he carries a class load twice as heavy as the average student.
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By Cassandra Berube | July 15, 2013
When a cannibal is your smallest problem, you know you've got issues. The allusions run heavy tonight. Too much of Harrison's beloved popsicles make him sick. Too much of Dexter makes Deb ...? But the more important question is, how did Harrison make that big of a mess? Harrison must have melted at least half of the box to make Dexter think Harrison had bled out. Didn't anyone teach the kid table manners? But Dexter's too focused on the case to worry about such trivial things.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Cassandra Berube | July 15, 2013
When a cannibal is your smallest problem, you know you've got issues. The allusions run heavy tonight. Too much of Harrison's beloved popsicles make him sick. Too much of Dexter makes Deb ...? But the more important question is, how did Harrison make that big of a mess? Harrison must have melted at least half of the box to make Dexter think Harrison had bled out. Didn't anyone teach the kid table manners? But Dexter's too focused on the case to worry about such trivial things.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 15, 2011
Today in Boca Raton, a South Florida woman named Ann Van Wagner pays a debt to an illegal immigrant who saved her life. Ms. Van Wagner has organized a fundraiser at a Boca bowling alley — "Bowling For Brains" — to support the Johns Hopkins Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory headed by Dr. Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa. "Dr. Q" removed a tumor from Ms. Van Wagner's brain at Hopkins in January 2010. She's made a full recovery and has been supporting his research ever since. Ms. Van Wagner's hero is perhaps the nation's leading illegal-turned-incredible citizen, a native Mexican who hopped a border fence in 1987, worked in the vegetable fields of the San Joaquin Valley and eventually ended up at Harvard Medical School, where he graduated cum laude.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 8, 1997
GIVEN his long history as a confidence man, Salvatore Spinnato might have ended up playing the part of a Galveston shrimp farmer, or a Dallas doctor, or maybe a Fort Worth physical therapist. Had things gone his way, he might have been chowing down enchiladas and knocking back tequila cocktails somewhere in Mexico by now. Or maybe he would have gone even farther south and ended up, like some character in a novel of Gabriel Garcia Marquez, running a steamboat in a river in Central America.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 21, 1999
AT THE TENDER AGE of 15, Princess Good walked into a public school for the first time. The school was Baltimore's Northern High School. Culture shock set in almost immediately.She came home and told her mother, Aloma Good, that Northern was a "rough" school. Princess was appalled at students using profanity and said she noticed "three or four fights a day.""The kids told her, `You don't look like us, you don't talk like us. You don't belong in this school,' " the elder Good recalled.In fairness to Northern, it's not the same school that made headlines months ago as one of the country's most notorious blackboard jungles.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | October 29, 2006
As he lathers up before surgery at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa mentally prepares himself to repair a living human brain. This one belongs to Robert Hawkins, a 28-year-old surfer from Vero Beach, Fla., who lies on an operating table with a tumor the size of an orange inside his head. The growth makes it difficult for Hawkins to control his left arm and left leg. But removing it takes hours and carries its own risks - a wrong move by the surgeon can ruin the cranial nerves that control Hawkins' movements, memory and ability to speak.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | February 15, 1994
New York -- Every couple of weeks or so I get a call from a friend or colleague in Canada saying something like: ''How can they lie the way they do about our health-care system? Almost every Canadian thinks we have a much, much better system than you do.''''I know, I know,'' I answer. ''But everyone from Bill Clinton on down is afraid that if we talk 'single-payer,' the insurance companies and the doctors will start screaming 'socialized medicine' again.''The screaming from the insurance companies begins because they could be eliminated if the United States did what everyone else in the world does: use government as the single-payer to guarantee universal health care.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | June 11, 1995
Is your life empty and without meaning?Would you sincerely like to be happier, healthier, sexier and more content?If so, keep reading.Nah. I'm lying. I don't know how to make you any of those things, though quite a few authors in America have made several million dollars taking a stab at it.Self-help books dominate the book market. "The Road Less Traveled: A New Psychology of Love, Traditional Values and Spiritual Growth" by M. Scott Peck has been on the New York Times nonfiction list for 605 weeks.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 15, 2011
Today in Boca Raton, a South Florida woman named Ann Van Wagner pays a debt to an illegal immigrant who saved her life. Ms. Van Wagner has organized a fundraiser at a Boca bowling alley — "Bowling For Brains" — to support the Johns Hopkins Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory headed by Dr. Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa. "Dr. Q" removed a tumor from Ms. Van Wagner's brain at Hopkins in January 2010. She's made a full recovery and has been supporting his research ever since. Ms. Van Wagner's hero is perhaps the nation's leading illegal-turned-incredible citizen, a native Mexican who hopped a border fence in 1987, worked in the vegetable fields of the San Joaquin Valley and eventually ended up at Harvard Medical School, where he graduated cum laude.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | October 29, 2006
As he lathers up before surgery at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa mentally prepares himself to repair a living human brain. This one belongs to Robert Hawkins, a 28-year-old surfer from Vero Beach, Fla., who lies on an operating table with a tumor the size of an orange inside his head. The growth makes it difficult for Hawkins to control his left arm and left leg. But removing it takes hours and carries its own risks - a wrong move by the surgeon can ruin the cranial nerves that control Hawkins' movements, memory and ability to speak.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 21, 1999
AT THE TENDER AGE of 15, Princess Good walked into a public school for the first time. The school was Baltimore's Northern High School. Culture shock set in almost immediately.She came home and told her mother, Aloma Good, that Northern was a "rough" school. Princess was appalled at students using profanity and said she noticed "three or four fights a day.""The kids told her, `You don't look like us, you don't talk like us. You don't belong in this school,' " the elder Good recalled.In fairness to Northern, it's not the same school that made headlines months ago as one of the country's most notorious blackboard jungles.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 8, 1997
GIVEN his long history as a confidence man, Salvatore Spinnato might have ended up playing the part of a Galveston shrimp farmer, or a Dallas doctor, or maybe a Fort Worth physical therapist. Had things gone his way, he might have been chowing down enchiladas and knocking back tequila cocktails somewhere in Mexico by now. Or maybe he would have gone even farther south and ended up, like some character in a novel of Gabriel Garcia Marquez, running a steamboat in a river in Central America.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | June 11, 1995
Is your life empty and without meaning?Would you sincerely like to be happier, healthier, sexier and more content?If so, keep reading.Nah. I'm lying. I don't know how to make you any of those things, though quite a few authors in America have made several million dollars taking a stab at it.Self-help books dominate the book market. "The Road Less Traveled: A New Psychology of Love, Traditional Values and Spiritual Growth" by M. Scott Peck has been on the New York Times nonfiction list for 605 weeks.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | February 15, 1994
New York -- Every couple of weeks or so I get a call from a friend or colleague in Canada saying something like: ''How can they lie the way they do about our health-care system? Almost every Canadian thinks we have a much, much better system than you do.''''I know, I know,'' I answer. ''But everyone from Bill Clinton on down is afraid that if we talk 'single-payer,' the insurance companies and the doctors will start screaming 'socialized medicine' again.''The screaming from the insurance companies begins because they could be eliminated if the United States did what everyone else in the world does: use government as the single-payer to guarantee universal health care.
FEATURES
By Jeff D. Opdyke and Jeff D. Opdyke,Orange County Register | February 3, 1992
COSTA MESA, Calif. -- Masoud Karkehabadi is dazzled by the mysteries of the brain, excited at the thought of a career spent unraveling its intricacies. The pre-med student knows he has the mind for it: He tutors other students in algebra and upper-division anatomy.But it's the childhood fantasies of "Peter Pan" that bring fire to his eyes.At 10 years old, Masoud is a genius wrapped in the body of a boy.His IQ rests somewhere above 200, and as a sophomore at Orange Coast College he carries a class load twice as heavy as the average student.
NEWS
By James Bock | May 28, 1991
A 22-year-old Ijamsville man was killed yesterday when an allegedly homemade bomb went off behind his house, the state fire marshal's office said.Ralph King of the 4700 block of Ijamsville Road was found by his wife Stacey, 21, in a yard between a three-car garage and a small storage building behind their home in the small Frederick County community, Deputy Chief Robert B. Thomas Jr. said.The 4:53 p.m. explosion, which could be heard for several blocks, was so strong that Mr. King's left hand was amputated just above the wrist and both his legs were broken.
NEWS
October 20, 2013
This is in regard to a column and an op-ed that you published Thursday. When I saw the headline titled, "Political system influenced by sociopaths” (Oct. 17) then saw Dan Rodricks' name and busted out laughing thinking he had an epiphany! I was shocked to see a virtual conversation involving Wayne Gilchrest waxing about the good old days of moderation while Rep. Andy Harris is presented more as an ideologue and far to the right.   Having met and known about him, he does share his beliefs, holds himself accountable to the public, and really states his cases well.
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