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NEWS
By Daniel S. Greenberg and Daniel S. Greenberg,Daniel S. Greenberg is editor and publisher of Science & Government Report | September 24, 1990
WE CAN WEATHER an oil shortage. The more dangerous problem is that we're running low on brain power. Doubt that? Then pay attention to two separate but related items:First, Congress is en route to changing the immigration law to ease the entry of foreign scientists and engineers to fill vacancies in industry and education. The change is inspired by spot shortages of specialists and declining enrollments of American students in scientific and technical studies. The drop has led to numerous forecasts of impending shortages in the professions that underpin our high-tech society.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen | March 13, 2014
Back from Tribal Council where Brice was voted out, Morgan is pissed that Jeremiah didn't vote with her. She does her best to throw him under the bus, stating in front of everyone that he was the one to come to her about getting rid of Alexis. Which may have been true, but then Morgan takes it even further, claiming Jeremiah wanted to get LJ out because he's a threat, but I don't think that's true. Over at the Brain tribe, they get Treemail with a clue about the upcoming challenge.
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SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2011
The first clue that this offensive line draft class is more than beef and brawn came when someone asked Boston College's Anthony Castonzo what he'll do after football. "I'd like to open up a foundation, pursue my biochemistry degree and use it to do cancer medical research," said Castonzo, giving an answer that seemed more fitting for a graduate school interview, not a scouting combine one. Three of the top offensive tackle prospects — Castonzo, Colorado's Nate Solder and Mississippi State's Derek Sherrod — have distinguished themselves as much in the classroom as on the football field.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2011
The first clue that this offensive line draft class is more than beef and brawn came when someone asked Boston College's Anthony Castonzo what he'll do after football. "I'd like to open up a foundation, pursue my biochemistry degree and use it to do cancer medical research," said Castonzo, giving an answer that seemed more fitting for a graduate school interview, not a scouting combine one. Three of the top offensive tackle prospects — Castonzo, Colorado's Nate Solder and Mississippi State's Derek Sherrod — have distinguished themselves as much in the classroom as on the football field.
NEWS
May 7, 1995
My girls read a lot - they say, reading burns a lot more calories than watching television. And, this is because, they say,it takes a lot more brain power!Jenny Sorel,upper school French teacher,Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,Sun Staff | April 25, 1999
Babies do it. So do businessmen. Your fifth-grade teacher did it, too. Some of us swear we never do it, but we're lying. Freud certainly did it -- and he was really, really interested in it. We're talking about dreaming, of course -- and not those delicious daytime fantasies about the speech you'll give your boss when the Powerball gods finally smile upon you. It wouldn't take a psychiatrist to uncover the root cause of that reverie. No, we speak of the nocturnal visions that flit up from the deepest layers of your subconscious, which can be far more perplexing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen | March 13, 2014
Back from Tribal Council where Brice was voted out, Morgan is pissed that Jeremiah didn't vote with her. She does her best to throw him under the bus, stating in front of everyone that he was the one to come to her about getting rid of Alexis. Which may have been true, but then Morgan takes it even further, claiming Jeremiah wanted to get LJ out because he's a threat, but I don't think that's true. Over at the Brain tribe, they get Treemail with a clue about the upcoming challenge.
NEWS
By Susan Jane Gilman | September 15, 1998
DO YOUNG women care more about their bodies than their brains? Time magazine recently answered "yes." In a cover story titled "Is feminism dead?" Time reported that young women today equate power with glamour and beauty. Said one 18-year-old: "Girl power means you wear hot pants and a bra with some sequins on it."Yet the very same week, another piece of news made quieter headlines. According to the Census Bureau, for the first time in history, more women than men ages 25-29 are earning college and graduate degrees.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | February 10, 1991
Dressed in blue coveralls, several would-be diesel mechanics sit in a classroom at the Carroll County Vocational Technical Centers with their notebooks open and calculators in action."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Pamela L. O'Connell and Pamela L. O'Connell,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 12, 2001
Maryann Rinsma has a thing about craters. She is not a geologist, but she has recently spent much of her spare time scrutinizing 2,200 photos of Mars landscapes from her home computer. Rinsma, a respiratory therapist in Bennington, Vt., is a regular visitor to an experimental NASA Web site that asks nonscientists to label craters on Mars, the red planet. The site is one of a growing number of endeavors aimed at tapping two underused resources: the brainpower and the good will of millions of Web users.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2003
People magazine picks the world's sexiest men. Forbes ranks the richest Americans. U.S. News and World Report calculates the country's top colleges. To the rankings of Hollywood beefcakes and business tycoons, add this nerdy new list: the 50 most influential scientists of the last two decades. No. 1 on the list is the Johns Hopkins University's Bert Vogelstein. "It's nice," says the 54-year-old cancer researcher, one of four Maryland scientists to make the cut and three to land in the top 10. "Whether you're in science or not, you like to think what you're doing is making an impact."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Pamela L. O'Connell and Pamela L. O'Connell,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 12, 2001
Maryann Rinsma has a thing about craters. She is not a geologist, but she has recently spent much of her spare time scrutinizing 2,200 photos of Mars landscapes from her home computer. Rinsma, a respiratory therapist in Bennington, Vt., is a regular visitor to an experimental NASA Web site that asks nonscientists to label craters on Mars, the red planet. The site is one of a growing number of endeavors aimed at tapping two underused resources: the brainpower and the good will of millions of Web users.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,Sun Staff | April 25, 1999
Babies do it. So do businessmen. Your fifth-grade teacher did it, too. Some of us swear we never do it, but we're lying. Freud certainly did it -- and he was really, really interested in it. We're talking about dreaming, of course -- and not those delicious daytime fantasies about the speech you'll give your boss when the Powerball gods finally smile upon you. It wouldn't take a psychiatrist to uncover the root cause of that reverie. No, we speak of the nocturnal visions that flit up from the deepest layers of your subconscious, which can be far more perplexing.
NEWS
By Susan Jane Gilman | September 15, 1998
DO YOUNG women care more about their bodies than their brains? Time magazine recently answered "yes." In a cover story titled "Is feminism dead?" Time reported that young women today equate power with glamour and beauty. Said one 18-year-old: "Girl power means you wear hot pants and a bra with some sequins on it."Yet the very same week, another piece of news made quieter headlines. According to the Census Bureau, for the first time in history, more women than men ages 25-29 are earning college and graduate degrees.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1997
Dr. David Kyle wasn't surprised when a British research study published earlier this month concluded that infants deprived of breast milk may be at higher risk for developing schizophrenia later in life.As one of the developers of a nutritional oil derived from micro algae, the Martek Biosciences Corp. researcher has long followed the growing body of scientific evidence that a certain fatty acid found in breast milk plays a critical role in the visual and neurological development of children.
NEWS
May 7, 1995
My girls read a lot - they say, reading burns a lot more calories than watching television. And, this is because, they say,it takes a lot more brain power!Jenny Sorel,upper school French teacher,Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | May 11, 1992
John Armstrong found a silver lining in the embarrassing process of having to walk onstage in an auditorium filled with proud relatives and receive an award."
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2003
People magazine picks the world's sexiest men. Forbes ranks the richest Americans. U.S. News and World Report calculates the country's top colleges. To the rankings of Hollywood beefcakes and business tycoons, add this nerdy new list: the 50 most influential scientists of the last two decades. No. 1 on the list is the Johns Hopkins University's Bert Vogelstein. "It's nice," says the 54-year-old cancer researcher, one of four Maryland scientists to make the cut and three to land in the top 10. "Whether you're in science or not, you like to think what you're doing is making an impact."
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | May 11, 1992
John Armstrong found a silver lining in the embarrassing process of having to walk onstage in an auditorium filled with proud relatives and receive an award."
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | February 10, 1991
Dressed in blue coveralls, several would-be diesel mechanics sit in a classroom at the Carroll County Vocational Technical Centers with their notebooks open and calculators in action."
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