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By Gary Fiskum | May 10, 2010
An Iraqi insurgent shot him in the chest. Later, he was wounded in the back in an ambush. But what left this U.S. Marine debilitated, perhaps for life, was a blast-induced, traumatic brain injury that initially went undetected. Advanced body armor is saving our troops' lives, but soldiers have little protection against blast-induced, traumatic brain injury, the "signature injury" in today's wars. There is a need for research that can help reduce such injuries, and Maryland has a unique ability to do it — with additional federal help.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
A Virginia mother has filed a $1 million suit against Trimper's Rides and Amusements in Ocean City claiming a ride left her young son with a traumatic brain injury. Raffinee McNeill, of Accomack County, filed the personal injury claim in U.S. District Court on July 23. According to the court filing, her son and his cousins were on the Hampton I, a ride geared toward youngsters that features miniature trucks and cars that travel in a circle, when an operator "abruptly" halted the ride to let another child off. At that time, McNeill claims, her son thought the ride was over and he also got out of his car. The operator resumed the ride and one of the cars hit her son, knocking him down and "fracturing his skull on the cement floor," according to the complaint.
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NEWS
November 10, 2010
Having survived a subdural hematoma, which occurred in July of 2007, the article about Austin Story's traumatic brain injury was the first thing I read Tuesday morning ("Kids make up largest group with traumatic brain injuries," Nov. 9). Although my profile is very different from Austin's, our trip through recovery is very much the same. These thoughts go out to Austin, his family, and the many others that have experienced a traumatic brain injury: It is a long, strange trip, but the brain is a fluid and amazing organ.
SPORTS
By Paul Pierre-Louis, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
When a motorcycle accident left Corey Davis strapped to a hospital bed seven years ago, he began to lose hope for a recovery. "This is it for the rest of my life," Davis, who suffered a severe traumatic brain injury that made him unable to walk, recalled thinking. But after six months of treatment at Johns Hopkins Hospital's Outpatient NeuroRehabilitation Program, he was back on his feet. Now the race director for Saturday's Ocean Games, an ocean sports event in Ocean City , Davis continues to give back to the program that helped him return to the active lifestyle he once thought was no longer possible.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
The brain injury Navy slotback Will McKamey suffered Saturday in Annapolis came during a noncontact practice drill, his parents wrote in an email distributed by an athletic department spokesman at the academy Monday. McKamey, a 5-foot-9, 170-pound freshman from Knoxville, Tenn., was airlifted from the practice field to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he underwent surgery and, as of Monday, remained in critical condition in a coma. The first padded drills of spring practice typically do not include any contact, and McKamey "did not sustain a bad hit or unusual or extreme contact in practice," his parents wrote.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2011
Doctors have called Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' recovery so far nothing short of spectacular. But as she begins rehabilitation at a facility in Houston, many Maryland experts on traumatic brain injury caution that what awaits her is a long, arduous road full of uncertainties. The work of retraining the brain after a severe gunshot wound like the one Giffords sustained two weeks ago can take years, beginning with months of intensive speech, occupational and physical therapy to teach the Arizona congresswoman to master basic functions many of us take for granted: dressing herself, eating and, perhaps, uttering a few words.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2011
The daylong conference Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital was held to showcase advances on research into traumatic brain injury. One recurring theme was the devastating toll such injuries have taken on an estimated 200,000 American soldiers wounded by explosions in Iraq and Afghanistan. The PowerPoint-wielding medical specialists had much progress to share. But the extent to which these brain injuries remain a stubborn mystery was highlighted when a doctor who treats soldiers in Fort Drum, N.Y., stepped up to the microphone at Turner Auditorium.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2010
Austin Story doesn't remember the late-summer outing at a friend's lakefront home in New Jersey, or the rocks he climbed near a waterfall. Or how he lost his footing and, as his horrified mother looked on, fell about 50 feet. The 14-year-old lay motionless with a traumatic brain injury as his father tried to get him off the rocks and find help. Two months later, Austin is still being treated at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, though he has learned again to walk and talk.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
More than six years ago, Scott Collier suffered a traumatic brain injury in an automobile accident. Though he's recovered, he says the injury changed his personality temporarily and his life forever. Now, he wants to use that experience to improve awareness of traumatic brain injuries, especially concussions at the youth and high school sports level. On Tuesday afternoon at CCBC's Dundalk campus, Collier said he plans to hold a seminar on traumatic brain injuries that he expects will be attended by representatives from Baltimore County Public Schools and county Department of Recreation and Parks Director Barry F. Williams.
NEWS
September 29, 2000
Thank you for The Sun's recent article on traumatic brain injury ("Brain injury: recovery and a lift of rediscovery," Sept. 19). As medical technology improves, stories like that of Alan Forman will increasingly be the norm, which is a message of hope for the 6,000 Marylanders each year who suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is important, however, to note that Maryland's funding commitment to persons with TBI has not kept pace with the miracles of technology. Currently, our state's budget includes no line for TBI. Persons injured before the age of 22 may be eligible for funding through the Developmental Disabilities Administration.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 19, 2014
Hillary Clinton hasn't even thrown her hat into the 2016 presidential ring yet, but Republican tremors over the very thought have already unleashed red flares about her age and health that question her qualifications for the office. It's an old partisan tactic, this time invoked by Karl Rove - the man who brought you George W. Bush, who with neither his age nor his health impeding his election arguably went on to be the worst American president to date with his Iraq invasion in 2003.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
In his recurring dream, Jose Villegas still gets up in the predawn darkness at his Carroll County farmhouse, loads his riding helmet and boots into the trunk of his Toyota Corolla and drives 75 minutes to Laurel Park. His favorite part of the dream comes next. As the sun rises over the track, the former jockey and longtime exercise rider is in the saddle, feeling the rush of wind on his face. He grew up around horses in Mexico, and riding made him feel he was home. But when he awakens in the morning, Villegas, 43, faces his stark new reality.
NEWS
May 14, 2014
Nobody brings out the Republican long knives quite like Hillary Clinton does, and this week, Comedy Central's Jon Stewart coined the perfect name for it: "Brainghazi. " It's the merging of the umpteenth investigation of Benghazi with the latest slander to be directed her way, the suggestion by Republican strategist Karl Rove that she's suffered brain damage. Mr. Rove tried to walk back that little smear on Tuesday after a New York Post headline to that effect set the Internet on fire.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
With heavy hearts and a new slogan to help remember their fallen teammate, the Navy football team returned to practice Tuesday in Annapolis. It came 10 days after freshman slotback Will McKamey collapsed from a brain injury on a nearby field and was flown by medical helicopter to Maryland Shock Trauma, where he died last Tuesday night. It came the day after more than 50 midshipmen, team members and coaches, as well as athletic director Chet Gladchuk and Vice Admiral Mike Miller, the academy's superintendant, attended McKamey's funeral in Knoxville, Tenn.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Navy football player Will McKamey died Tuesday night at Maryland Shock Trauma, three days after collapsing during a practice in Annapolis. McKamey, 19, never regained consciousness after undergoing surgery to relieve bleeding and swelling in his brain. "We are all so very heartbroken by the death of Midshipman Will McKamey," Naval Academy Superintendent Mike Miller said in a statement. "This is devastating news for his family, his classmates, his teammates and the entire Naval Academy family.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
A former Navy football player whose career was ended prematurely after he sustained a brain injury in a car accident said Monday night that he plans to come to Baltimore next week to comfort a former teammate who is now in a coma after brain surgery Saturday. Freshman slotback Will McKamey collapsed during a noncontact practice in Annapolis and was flown by medical helicopter to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he underwent surgery to relieve a blood clot on his brain. McKamey, who is from Knoxville, Tenn., has shown “little response” since then, according to his parents.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1995
Stephanie Strunge recalls the late-night wail of an ambulance siren. Jim Strunge remembers hearing the low-flying helicopter.But the Towson couple never suspected their teen-age son's life was in jeopardy until the phone rang an hour later, triggering every parent's nightmare -- a message that their child was being airlifted to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore."
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | March 23, 2009
The death of 45-year-old Natasha Richardson last week from what had been labeled a "mild brain injury" after a skiing accident has experts in trauma warning the public to take a blow to the head seriously. An autopsy confirmed the actress, who fell on the slopes, died of an epidural hematoma, which is bleeding between the skull and the outer layer that covers the brain called the dura. But doctors not involved in her care noted reports that said she initially refused treatment. It's not possible for those who didn't examine her to say faster treatment would have saved her. And death from such a seemingly minor accident is rare.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
As Rafi Montalvo was recovering last fall from a brain injury he sustained in a near-fatal car accident, the former Navy quarterback talked with teammate Will McKamey about his own return to the football field. McKamey, then a freshman, became an inspiration for Montalvo during his rehabilitation. When he was a senior at Grace Christian Academy in Knoxville, Tenn., in the fall of 2012, McKamey had collapsed during a playoff game and was hopitalized for several days after suffering from a blood clot that caused bleeding and swelling of his brain.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
The brain injury Navy slotback Will McKamey suffered Saturday in Annapolis came during a noncontact practice drill, his parents wrote in an email distributed by an athletic department spokesman at the academy Monday. McKamey, a 5-foot-9, 170-pound freshman from Knoxville, Tenn., was airlifted from the practice field to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he underwent surgery and, as of Monday, remained in critical condition in a coma. The first padded drills of spring practice typically do not include any contact, and McKamey "did not sustain a bad hit or unusual or extreme contact in practice," his parents wrote.
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