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Brain Development

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HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | February 20, 2012
Babies who develop autism later in life may show signs of the disease in their brain development as early as six months old, new research has found. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis , the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and other institutions looked at brain scans taken on babies at night while they were sleeping. The scans indicate autism may develp in infants over time, according to the findings published online in the American Journal of Psychiatry . By aged 24 months, 28 of 92 infants showed the medical signs for autism spectrum disorders.
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NEWS
June 5, 2013
Wise parental support and an effective education delivery system will result in excellent report cards, well prepared high school graduates and a stronger economy, right? All of that may be true if there's been good maternal and child nutrition. The first 1,000 days of each student's life, from pregnancy to age 2, are critical to brain development. The ability of an undernourished child to learn and work is much more likely to be diminished. Globally, nearly 200 million chronically malnourished children suffer serious, often irreversible, physical and cognitive damage.
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NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | May 18, 2007
Scientists today offered their first peek at research on a group of "super-healthy" children from six U.S. cities whose brains will serve as models of typical childhood development. Initial results from the National Institutes of Health study, the most comprehensive of its kind to date, suggest that healthy children perform better on cognitive tests than researchers previously thought - and this was particularly true among children from low-income families. But experts said today's conclusions - published in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society - are less important than what's to come: digital images of the children's brains collected as they grow and develop.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | February 20, 2012
Babies who develop autism later in life may show signs of the disease in their brain development as early as six months old, new research has found. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis , the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and other institutions looked at brain scans taken on babies at night while they were sleeping. The scans indicate autism may develp in infants over time, according to the findings published online in the American Journal of Psychiatry . By aged 24 months, 28 of 92 infants showed the medical signs for autism spectrum disorders.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1998
Will listening to classical music turn infants into Einsteins? Governor Zell Miller of Georgia thinks so, and to prove it he's giving a free classical CD or tape to every newborn in his state.Last week, Miller announced that Sony Music Corp. had agreed to donate 100,000 recordings for distribution in Georgia hospitals -- enough to give one to each newly minted Georgian for a year."Play it often," Miller advises parents in a message included with the recording. "I hope both you and your baby enjoy it -- and that your little one will get off to a smart start."
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
Columbia-based Martek Biosciences Corp. Thursday said it agreed to the $14 million sale of a "significant portion" of a Kentucky plant used to make a health supplement for infant formula. The sale is part of a restructuring effort to lower Martek's production costs as prices for its infant formula additive, which benefits brain development, have dropped. The deal includes a majority of the land and buildings at the site in Winchester, Ky., but does not include the sale or rights to any of Martek's patents or other technologies.
NEWS
May 29, 2000
THERE's a lot of controversy surrounding the use of Ritalin to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorders in children. That's why the American Pediatric Association's recent guidelines on diagnosing ADHD are such a needed step in better evaluating school-age children with this problem. ADHD itself is controversial. The diagnosis is derived from observations, not blood or brain-imaging tests. About 2.5 million American kids, mostly boys, have been diagnosed with the disorder -- and many doctors prescribe Ritalin to relieve symptoms that include extreme restlessness, an inability to concentrate, impulsive behavior and difficulty sitting still.
NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Denise Gellene,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 14, 2007
The brains of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder develop more slowly than those of other children but eventually catch up, according to a government study published this week that suggests ADHD might be a transient condition, at least for some people. Using advanced imaging techniques, scientists found that the cortices of children with ADHD reach peak thickness an average of three years later than children without the disorder. The cortex is involved in decision-making and supports the ability to focus attention, remember things moment to moment and suppress inappropriate actions - functions often deficient in children with ADHD.
NEWS
By Jeremy Manier and Jeremy Manier,Chicago Tribune | May 11, 2008
CHICAGO -- A tide of recent research on early childhood development is inspiring prominent scientists and politicians to argue for an unprecedented investment in schooling that begins virtually at birth. But as decades of academic studies on brain development start to land in the real world, experts are divided on whether to focus new funding on infants and toddlers, or conventional preschool. Many now think that some policies popular with politicians and the public, such as universal pre-kindergarten, may fail to reach at-risk kids at a young enough age to achieve significant benefits.
NEWS
June 5, 2013
Wise parental support and an effective education delivery system will result in excellent report cards, well prepared high school graduates and a stronger economy, right? All of that may be true if there's been good maternal and child nutrition. The first 1,000 days of each student's life, from pregnancy to age 2, are critical to brain development. The ability of an undernourished child to learn and work is much more likely to be diminished. Globally, nearly 200 million chronically malnourished children suffer serious, often irreversible, physical and cognitive damage.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
Columbia-based Martek Biosciences Corp. Thursday said it agreed to the $14 million sale of a "significant portion" of a Kentucky plant used to make a health supplement for infant formula. The sale is part of a restructuring effort to lower Martek's production costs as prices for its infant formula additive, which benefits brain development, have dropped. The deal includes a majority of the land and buildings at the site in Winchester, Ky., but does not include the sale or rights to any of Martek's patents or other technologies.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Gus Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
A decade-long effort to create a biotechnology park at Johns Hopkins in East Baltimore received a boost Wednesday when a new brain research institute that will be led by several renowned scientists announced plans to establish its headquarters there. Officials with the Lieber Institute for Brain Development announced their selection of the Hopkins-affiliated biopark over four other medical research institutions across the country that vied to become its permanent home. The institute, which is funded by an endowment of more than $100 million, is expected to employ up to 60 researchers focusing on schizophrenia, stem cells, neurobiology and other brain-related fields.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | May 18, 2009
For years, school systems across the nation dropped the arts to concentrate on getting struggling students to pass tests in reading and math. Yet now, a growing body of brain research suggests that teaching the arts may be good for students across all disciplines. Scientists are now looking at, for instance, whether students at an arts high school who study music or drawing have brains that allow them to focus more intensely or do better in the classroom. Washington County schools Superintendent Betty Morgan would have liked to have had some of that basic research in her hands when she began building a coalition for an arts high school in Hagerstown.
NEWS
By Jeremy Manier and Jeremy Manier,Chicago Tribune | May 11, 2008
CHICAGO -- A tide of recent research on early childhood development is inspiring prominent scientists and politicians to argue for an unprecedented investment in schooling that begins virtually at birth. But as decades of academic studies on brain development start to land in the real world, experts are divided on whether to focus new funding on infants and toddlers, or conventional preschool. Many now think that some policies popular with politicians and the public, such as universal pre-kindergarten, may fail to reach at-risk kids at a young enough age to achieve significant benefits.
NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Denise Gellene,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 14, 2007
The brains of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder develop more slowly than those of other children but eventually catch up, according to a government study published this week that suggests ADHD might be a transient condition, at least for some people. Using advanced imaging techniques, scientists found that the cortices of children with ADHD reach peak thickness an average of three years later than children without the disorder. The cortex is involved in decision-making and supports the ability to focus attention, remember things moment to moment and suppress inappropriate actions - functions often deficient in children with ADHD.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | May 18, 2007
Scientists today offered their first peek at research on a group of "super-healthy" children from six U.S. cities whose brains will serve as models of typical childhood development. Initial results from the National Institutes of Health study, the most comprehensive of its kind to date, suggest that healthy children perform better on cognitive tests than researchers previously thought - and this was particularly true among children from low-income families. But experts said today's conclusions - published in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society - are less important than what's to come: digital images of the children's brains collected as they grow and develop.
NEWS
By Clark Brill | December 6, 1995
AGAIN THE controversy is renewed over whether homosexuals are born or made. This sounds very reminiscent of the hubbub stimulated last year by the book ''The Bell Curve'' about whether genetic intelligence differs by race.That there is a political agenda in these issues cannot be escaped. Conservatives, for example, tend to favor the genetic theory behind IQ as a rationalization for decreasing entitlements for remedial education programs since presumably no amount of extra time or effort (or money)
NEWS
By Kathleen Megan and Kathleen Megan,The Hartford Courant | December 5, 2004
One minute your teenage daughter is having a relaxed, happy conversation with her friend on the phone. The next, she stumbles over an algebra problem and is -- instantly -- as angry as you've seen her. She flings her pencil across the room, stomps up to her room, slams the door and shouts, "I hate my life!" Your teenage son appears to be in a good mood, and you ask him in your best modulated tone if he remembered to empty the dishwasher. "Why are you always yelling at me? I hate this family!"
NEWS
By Kathleen Megan and Kathleen Megan,The Hartford Courant | December 5, 2004
One minute your teenage daughter is having a relaxed, happy conversation with her friend on the phone. The next, she stumbles over an algebra problem and is -- instantly -- as angry as you've seen her. She flings her pencil across the room, stomps up to her room, slams the door and shouts, "I hate my life!" Your teenage son appears to be in a good mood, and you ask him in your best modulated tone if he remembered to empty the dishwasher. "Why are you always yelling at me? I hate this family!"
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 25, 2004
At a pivotal time in human evolution, about 2.4 million years ago, a muscle gene underwent a disabling alteration. And scientists say this could have made all the difference, leading to the enlarged brains of the lineage that evolved into modern humans. Researchers who made the discovery said this might be the first recognized functional genetic difference between humans and the apes that can be correlated with anatomical changes in the fossil record. As they said: The gene mutation might represent the beginning of the ancestral triumph of brain over brawn.
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