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Brain Damage

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NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1996
A malpractice complaint filed yesterday alleges that a newborn baby suffered brain damage because a home health nurse, and later a physician, failed to diagnose and treat jaundice.The issues in the case are at the heart of a national debate over how health plans handle maternity care. Earlier this week, the Maryland House and Senate each passed separate bills that would guarantee mothers and their babies a minimum two-night stay in the hospital.The infant, Sheiku Koroma, appeared healthy at birth.
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NEWS
By Steve Almond | September 24, 2014
While football remains far and away our country's most popular sport, in the past few years it has also become our most fraught, thanks to a steady drumbeat of stories underscoring its moral and physical hazards. The headlines dominating the news for the past few weeks have outlined cases of domestic violence by players against their girlfriends (the Ravens' Ray Rice among them) and children, and the acknowledgment by the NFL that one in three players is likely to suffer brain trauma.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1998
Ruthann Aron has brain damage and was unable to make sound judgments, said two doctors who saw her weeks after her arrest in June.Dr. Lawrence Kline testified yesterday that Aron, 55, has a "subtle abnormality" in her brain that could cause paranoia, impulsive behavior and inappropriate outbursts of temper.Kline is the director of the psychiatric unit at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, where Aron was taken for testing and treatment in )) August. He said he ordered two types of brain scans after Aron told him she had once been thrown to the floor by her husband and lost consciousness.
NEWS
May 14, 2014
Nobody brings out the Republican long knives quite like Hillary Clinton does, and this week, Comedy Central's Jon Stewart coined the perfect name for it: "Brainghazi. " It's the merging of the umpteenth investigation of Benghazi with the latest slander to be directed her way, the suggestion by Republican strategist Karl Rove that she's suffered brain damage. Mr. Rove tried to walk back that little smear on Tuesday after a New York Post headline to that effect set the Internet on fire.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | November 29, 1990
A Baltimore woman charged in a lawsuit yesterday that three doctors and an area hospital allowed her son's asthma medication to reach toxic levels, causing a catastrophic seizure that left him profoundly brain damaged.Dorothy Hook, the mother of 12-year-old Anthony G. August, said she wants not only to recoup money to provide for her son's needs, but also to alert parents and doctors to the dangers of the drug theophylline when it is not properly monitored."He doesn't play with toys. He doesn't feed himself.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 15, 1991
Going out with Alex Hawkins usually meant staying up most of the night and, whether you wanted to or not, officially greeting the sunrise. You came home in the early dawn to the accompaniment of birds singing and alarm clocks ringing. The morning newspaper was on the stoop.There has always been something arresting about Hawkins' personality and that, of course, can be taken literally because there was a time when he and traveling companions were apprehended by the Baltimore County Police Department for playing cards in the back of a barber shop at 4 a.m. Such scandal.
NEWS
By Gina Kolata and Gina Kolata,New York Times News Service | November 26, 1992
For the first time, doctors have repaired brain damage in patients by implanting brain tissue from aborted fetuses.Experts say the findings offer the first unequivocal evidence that implanted fetal cells can make crucial brain chemicals in place of brain cells that have died.Though the technique has been tested in only a few patients, the experts said it could eventually lead to treatments for degenerative brain diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | February 16, 1991
Anne Arundel County police have charged a Baltimore man with trying to murder a woman who was beaten so badly that she was in a coma for a month after she was attacked in November and and now suffers from severe brain damage.David Lee Stanfield, 21, of the 600 block of East Patapsco Avenue was charged Thursday with attempted first-degree murder.Police said he had just met the woman on the night she was attacked.The victim, Dawn Marie Gallis, 25, of Jessup, is still hospitalized in a rehabilitation center.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2005
An autopsy on Terri Schiavo found that she had massive, irreversible brain damage, a Florida medical examiner's office said yesterday in a report that gave scientific support to her husband's decision to withdraw her feeding tube. But for Schiavo's parents and others, the findings didn't end the ethical or medical debate that eventually drew in Congress and the White House. Bob and Mary Schindler still say that their daughter would not have wanted her life ended and that she was not in a persistent vegetative state, their lawyer, David Gibbs III, said.
SPORTS
By Scott Fowler and Scott Fowler,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 7, 1991
"When you get knocked out, you don't feel any pain. You jus blink your eyes and everything shuts off. Total blackness." -- Golden Gloves boxer Ricky Ray Taylor"We have no other sport that deliberately destroys brain substance. Boxing should be banned, not only for pros but also for amateurs. The brain can't tell whether or not the fist hitting it is paid to do so." -- Dr. George Lundberg, editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association.Jamey Carnell's brain is getting battered.The blows from Carnell's opponent, Juan Rosales Jr., are brutal, systematic and entirely within the rules of our most savage sport.
NEWS
November 5, 2013
Since the Ravens organization thinks that is OK for government to force all U.S. citizens to buy health care ("State insurance exchange paid Ravens $130K for advertising," Oct. 25), they will be OK when the government decides that too many innocent football players have received brain damage and ban football from being played. J. Heming, Baltimore
NEWS
September 8, 2013
By now, most sports fans have heard about the $765 million settlement the NFL has reached with former players who have serious brain injuries plausibly caused by that contact sport during their professional careers ("Goodell: Settlement is great for all," Sept. 5). The possibility of concussions and subsequent brain damage that may show up in later years, however, can occur at any level of the sport. Who will take care of former college and high school football athletes who are now victims?
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2013
The Ellicott City man who drowned at a Tough Mudder obstacle course race was under water for between five and 15 minutes before rescuers pulled him out, according to witness accounts in the investigative report by a West Virginia sheriff's office. Sgt. Ted Snyder, who investigated Avishek Sengupta's death for the Berkeley County sheriff's office, found that the circumstances of the April 20 incident did not warrant criminal charges. The office closed the case about a month later.
NEWS
By Saul E. Kerpelman | March 6, 2013
In October 2011, the Court of Appeals, Maryland's highest court, struck down provisions of the Reduction of Lead Risk in Housing Act that gave landlords immunity from being sued in some circumstances when children were poisoned by lead based paint in their properties. The court left intact the safety provisions of the act that require landlords statewide to meet certain minimum safety standards with respect to lead based-paint hazards. The court said that the immunity provisions were unconstitutional because they denied brain-damaged children their day in court and denied them a remedy for their injuries.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 29, 2013
President Barack Obama and Baltimore Ravens safety Ed Reed have something in common. Both love the game of football but would be hesitant to expose a son to its physical dangers. "I am a big football fan, but I have to tell you, if I had a son, I'd have to think long and hard before I let him play football," said the president in an interview with The New Republic. "I'm with Obama," said Mr. Reed. "I have a son. I am not forcing football on my son. ... All I can do is say, 'Son, I played it so you don't have to.'" During a Super Bowl week press conference in New Orleans, Mr. Reed noted that the dangers of the game had now captured the president's attention: "When you've got the president talking about it, you got something.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Adults who lose their hearing later in life also are more likely to have a hard time concentrating on a book or remembering a simple conversation, Johns Hopkins research has found. The same brain functions that affect hearing also may cause problems with memory and other cognitive function, according to the study, published this month in JAMA Internal Medicine. It is the latest to support a link between hearing loss and decline of memory. The Hopkins researchers said that many people view hearing loss as an inconvenience of old age but that it may also contribute to more serious health problems.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2003
A 10-year-old Crofton boy who lawyers say suffered brain damage from inadequate oxygen in the minutes after his birth was awarded $6.4 million yesterday in one of the largest medical malpractice verdicts in Anne Arundel County history. A Circuit Court jury found pediatrician Stephen A. Liverman negligent in his treatment of the boy, who lawyers said was born blue and went without sufficient oxygen for 80 minutes after he was delivered prematurely. The jury found him and the hospital, Anne Arundel Medical Center, liable for damages.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,American Heart Association Pub Date: 9/24/96SUN STAFF | September 24, 1996
As a new generation of treatments emerges for stroke, several Maryland hospitals are gearing up, creating teams and streamlining emergency room procedures to make sure stroke victims are handled as aggressively as trauma and heart patients.In stroke, every minute now counts.If someone gets to the emergency room within a crucial three-hour window of noticing stroke symptoms, a clot-dissolving drug, called t-PA, can reopen their blocked artery, restore blood flow and prevent fatal or disabling brain damage.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 2, 2012
A drug commonly used by patients with HIV may be damaging nerve cells and causing memory loss, Johns Hopkins researchers have found. Doctors have long thought the brain damage and memory loss longterm survivors of HIV suffer was caused by the disease. Johns Hopkins scientists now believe a large cause is the anti-retroviral drug efavirenz, which attacks and damages brain cells. Efavirenz is one of the drugs patients with HIV use to suppress the disease. The researchers believe a minor change in the drug's structure may be able to block its toxic effects and still allow it to suppress the virus.  Norman J. Haughey, Ph.D., lead researcher and an associate professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine , said in a release that the research is further evidence of the health problems drugs to treat HIV can cause.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
A man who was suffered brain damage after being struck with a brick in 1997 died over the summer and has been added to Baltimore's list of open homicide cases, while police identified the man fatally shot on Chesterfield Avenue on Sunday night.  Those killings are in addition to a fatal shooting in Sandtown Winchester and Patterson Park . Kwame Stern, 22, was the man shot in the 3000 block of Chesterfield Ave., just days after a...
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