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NEWS
December 27, 2009
I n the 1950s, a third of those who worked in the area used their hands to make cars and cans, soap and sugar, tools and spices. But that steel-solid manufacturing core was barely holding on by the dawn of this decade. Bethlehem Steel declared bankruptcy in 2001. General Motors' Broening Highway plant assembled its last van in 2005. At ghostly Sparrows Point, once teeming with 30,000 steelworkers, just a couple of thousand people punch in. The region's economy now centers on the head, not the hands, with workers in the lab rather than on the line.
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SPORTS
By Jon Fogg and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
UPDATE -- Oct. 1 Jack McGlone wrote on his blog Monday that his brother Bill has been diagnosed with neurosarcoidosis , a rare condition causing inflammation in the brain, spinal cord and other areas of the nervous system. No exact cause is known for sarcoidosis, including the neurological variety that Bill McGlone has. Generally, doctors think neurosarcoidosis might have a genetic link, according to MedLine Plus , and they also suspect that bacterial or viral infections, or contact with certain types of chemicals or dust, could trigger it. In an update over the weekend, Jack said doctors at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia had "pretty much ruled out" cancer after a biopsy of a mass found on his brain during a CT scan.
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SPORTS
June 29, 2010
Bengals wide receiver Chris Henry suffered from a chronic brain injury that may have influenced his mental state and behavior before he died last winter, West Virginia University researchers said Monday. The doctors had done a tissue analysis of Henry's brain that showed he suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Henry died in December, a day after he came out of the back of a pickup truck his fiancee was driving near their home in Charlotte, N.C. Neurosurgeon Julian Bailes and fellow researchers at West Virginia believe chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, is caused by multiple head impacts, regardless of whether those blows result in a concussion diagnosis.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
A Virginia mother has filed a $1 million suit against Trimper's Rides and Amusements in Ocean City claiming a ride left her young son with a traumatic brain injury. Raffinee McNeill, of Accomack County, filed the personal injury claim in U.S. District Court on July 23. According to the court filing, her son and his cousins were on the Hampton I, a ride geared toward youngsters that features miniature trucks and cars that travel in a circle, when an operator "abruptly" halted the ride to let another child off. At that time, McNeill claims, her son thought the ride was over and he also got out of his car. The operator resumed the ride and one of the cars hit her son, knocking him down and "fracturing his skull on the cement floor," according to the complaint.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2012
Amid growing concerns about concussions, more student athletes are having their brain function tested prior to injury in a procedure called baseline testing that is becoming increasingly mainstream. Baseline tests can be used for comparison to neurological exams after an athlete suffers a concussion to help choose the best treatment. The tests, on the market for a few years, are used mostly by school athletic programs and collegiate and professional teams. This summer, HeadFirst began offering the test to patients at concussion centers in Gambrills and Annapolis.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
More than six years ago, Scott Collier suffered a traumatic brain injury in an automobile accident. Though he's recovered, he says the injury changed his personality temporarily and his life forever. Now, he wants to use that experience to improve awareness of traumatic brain injuries, especially concussions at the youth and high school sports level. On Tuesday afternoon at CCBC's Dundalk campus, Collier said he plans to hold a seminar on traumatic brain injuries that he expects will be attended by representatives from Baltimore County Public Schools and county Department of Recreation and Parks Director Barry F. Williams.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 29, 2013
My husband and I just spent 10 days in Southern California, and it was a dream vacation. In fact, all our vacations seem to be dream vacations. And not in the way that you might think. Like most working stiffs, we scramble to get to the get-away day. And then we stay up half the night packing and putting the house in shape to leave it behind. But sleep is not what we seek when we land on those ever-downier hotel beds — because we know what the dreaming will be like. These will not be old-fashioned anxiety dreams (I am sitting in the French final without ever having been to class; I can't dial the right phone number no matter how hard I try; I left the baby at the mall; I can't remember the combination on my high school locker)
NEWS
By RONALD KOTULAK and RONALD KOTULAK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 19, 2006
Scientists are still a long way from figuring out what women and men really want, but they are getting a lot closer to understanding what makes their brains so different. That women and men think differently has little to do with whether they are handed dolls or trucks to play with as infants. After all, when infant monkeys are given a choice of human toys, females prefer dolls and males go after cars and trucks. The differences, researchers are beginning to discover, may have a lot more to do with how powerful hormones wire the female and male brain during early development and later in life.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 20, 1992
For the first time, scientists have been able to view human thought processes directly, tracing the complex patterns of electrical and chemical reactions to small clusters of brain cells.These unique glimpses of the brain at work are not the result of sophisticated new technologies that employ radioisotopes or X-rays to monitor brain activity.Instead, the researchers used a comparatively simple camera that records subtle differences in reflected light -- too small to be seen with the naked eye -- that flicker.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | April 27, 1995
CHICAGO -- Researchers from Chicago, New York and Florida report the first proof that fetal tissue transplants survived, grew and functioned in the brain of a Parkinson's patient, a milestone that eventually may lead to new therapies for Huntington's, Alzheimer's, strokes and other disorders.The transplant was linked to a significant improvement in the patient's condition, freeing him from the prison of rigidity and immobility, the main symptoms of the disease, and enabling him to enroll in an exercise class.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 11, 2014
Just in time for Father's Day, I'd like to say happy Mother's Day to all the dads out there. It turns out, you are more like her than you knew. Long after the kids are grown and gone, a mother's body bears witness to pregnancy, childbirth and nursing. But researchers say the change may be most profound in her brain. From earliest times - and in primates and other mammals - females have become more focused as a result of having offspring. They are increasingly aware of the environment and the dangers it presents.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
From his seat at a Federal Hill restaurant, surrounded by friends, Steele Stanwick had a funny feeling as he watched his younger brother Wells in Johns Hopkins' 14-8 victory at Virginia in the first round of the NCAA men's lacrosse tournament Sunday. It was the feeling that Steele Stanwick had seen his brother's dodges and goals before - namely because he himself had used them and had scored them. "It was kind of surreal," said the elder Stanwick, a Loyola High grad and former Cavalier.
NEWS
May 14, 2014
Nobody brings out the Republican long knives quite like Hillary Clinton does, and this week, Comedy Central's Jon Stewart coined the perfect name for it: "Brainghazi. " It's the merging of the umpteenth investigation of Benghazi with the latest slander to be directed her way, the suggestion by Republican strategist Karl Rove that she's suffered brain damage. Mr. Rove tried to walk back that little smear on Tuesday after a New York Post headline to that effect set the Internet on fire.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
At a lab on the edge of the Johns Hopkins University's East Baltimore medical campus, researchers grow tumors on mice so they can try and cure them. But one day, the cancer wouldn't grow. They tried again and again for months. Figuring there must be something different about this batch of mice, they finally discovered the rodents had been given a drug to prevent pinworm. Three years later, the common parasite treatment that retails for a few dollars a dose is being given to terminal brain cancer patients in a trial that could lead to more widespread use. Researchers who toiled for years for such a discovery said they still are investigating how it works.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
With heavy hearts and a new slogan to help remember their fallen teammate, the Navy football team returned to practice Tuesday in Annapolis. It came 10 days after freshman slotback Will McKamey collapsed from a brain injury on a nearby field and was flown by medical helicopter to Maryland Shock Trauma, where he died last Tuesday night. It came the day after more than 50 midshipmen, team members and coaches, as well as athletic director Chet Gladchuk and Vice Admiral Mike Miller, the academy's superintendant, attended McKamey's funeral in Knoxville, Tenn.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
A former Navy football player whose career was ended prematurely after he sustained a brain injury in a car accident said Monday night that he plans to come to Baltimore next week to comfort a former teammate who is now in a coma after brain surgery Saturday. Freshman slotback Will McKamey collapsed during a noncontact practice in Annapolis and was flown by medical helicopter to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he underwent surgery to relieve a blood clot on his brain. McKamey, who is from Knoxville, Tenn., has shown “little response” since then, according to his parents.
NEWS
By Sandy Kleffman and Sandy Kleffman,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 5, 2005
Providing one more clue for solving the autism mystery, researchers have discovered that the brain mechanism that stops or slows nerve impulses contributes to the disorder. A team at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., found that genes that serve as "off switches" in the brain's neurons play a role. Exactly how such genes interact and what happens in the brains of autistic children remains unknown. But the findings are sure to intrigue the many parents of autistic children who have long suspected that their children suffer from a sensory overload.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | July 26, 2005
WASHINGTON - Dear motorist: If you like to drive while chattering on your cell phone, it may be time to pull over to finish that conversation. Or, at least, think twice. According to some new studies, you would have to think at least twice, or maybe three or four times, to make up for the useful brain power that cell-phone conversations drain out of your brain, whether you use a hands-free device or not. A study of Australian highway crashes published recently in the British Medical Journal found that drivers yakking on cell phones are four times more likely to be involved in a serious crash, regardless of whether the drivers were talking on a hand-held or hands-free device.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
The brain injury Navy slotback Will McKamey suffered Saturday in Annapolis came during a noncontact practice drill, his parents wrote in an email distributed by an athletic department spokesman at the academy Monday. McKamey, a 5-foot-9, 170-pound freshman from Knoxville, Tenn., was airlifted from the practice field to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he underwent surgery and, as of Monday, remained in critical condition in a coma. The first padded drills of spring practice typically do not include any contact, and McKamey "did not sustain a bad hit or unusual or extreme contact in practice," his parents wrote.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
Navy football player Will McKamey remained in critical condition late Sunday at Maryland Shock Trauma, one day after he sustained a brain injury during a spring practice in Annapolis, according to a hospital spokeswoman. Kara McKamey posted on Facebook Saturday that her son was in a coma, and on Sunday, the family — through the Naval Academy — released a statement saying it has received "only small responses" from the 19-year-old. McKamey, a 5-9, 170-pound rising sophomore slotback from Knoxville, Tenn.
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