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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Benjamin C. Bradlee, the editor who transformed the Washington Post into one of the nation's best papers and guided it through Watergate, is retiring as executive editor.He will be succeeded by Managing Editor Leonard Downie, who rose through the editing ranks of the paper after a career as an investigative reporter.Bradlee's retirement is effective Sept. 2, one week after his 70th birthday.Bradlee will become a vice president of the Post and a director of the Washington Post Co., which owns Newsweek magazine, television stations and other newspaper properties.
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BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2004
Two former employees of Mercantile Bankshares Corp. have agreed to settle charges that they used insider information to tip family members and a friend to lucrative information about the Baltimore company's acquisition of F&M Bancorp weeks before it was announced nearly two years ago. Russell T. Bradlee, 25, and Louis P. Stone IV, 27, passed along confidential information despite a warning from their supervisor who was working on the transaction that...
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BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2004
Two former employees of Mercantile Bankshares Corp. have agreed to settle charges that they used insider information to tip family members and a friend to lucrative information about the Baltimore company's acquisition of F&M Bancorp weeks before it was announced nearly two years ago. Russell T. Bradlee, 25, and Louis P. Stone IV, 27, passed along confidential information despite a warning from their supervisor who was working on the transaction that...
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - It was the detail that told the story for Mary McGrory, and the tiny but exquisitely telling detail that turned the longtime newspaper columnist into one of the giants of 20th-century journalism. McGrory, who died Wednesday night at age 85, chronicled Washington life for more than five decades, bringing meticulous reporting, a lyrical, poetic style and an unwavering liberal lens to events from the Army-McCarthy hearings of 1954 to Watergate 20 years later, to President Bush's decision to invade Iraq in 2003.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Erin Texeira contributed to this article | May 2, 1998
ST. MARY'S CITY -- A showdown in the tiny waterfront town of St. Mary's City ended yesterday when Benjamin C. Bradlee, chairman of the Historic St. Mary's City Commission, told 40 angry residents that the site's popular executive director had resigned.But Bradlee would not tell supporters of Candace Matelic, 45, the circumstances of her departure after less than a year at the head of the state's outdoor living-history museum.The terms of a potential agreement with Matelic barred him from discussing the matter, he told a crowd that confronted him and other members of the commission at its regular meeting.
NEWS
January 20, 1992
A couple of delegates were trying to figure out what would happen if the legislature began trimming the budget of Gov. William Donald Schaefer's feel-good program, "Maryland, You Are Beautiful."First, they decided, it would probably turn into the "Maryland, You Are Lovely" campaign. And if they continued cutting, into "Maryland, You Are Pretty Nice."Then, they reasoned, if budget cutters got really serious, it could drop the campaign to "Maryland, You Are Adequate."Finally, they decided, if the cuts got really bad, Mr. Schaefer could call it "Maryland, You Are Fair After Two Beers."
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - It was the detail that told the story for Mary McGrory, and the tiny but exquisitely telling detail that turned the longtime newspaper columnist into one of the giants of 20th-century journalism. McGrory, who died Wednesday night at age 85, chronicled Washington life for more than five decades, bringing meticulous reporting, a lyrical, poetic style and an unwavering liberal lens to events from the Army-McCarthy hearings of 1954 to Watergate 20 years later, to President Bush's decision to invade Iraq in 2003.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 18, 2001
WASHINGTON - In a town supposedly known for its "giants," political and otherwise, if the truth be known there have been few who genuinely have deserved the name over the last half-century. A case can be made for some of the presidents - perhaps Harry Truman, Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, even Ronald Reagan. In Congress, senators like Everett Dirksen, Hubert Humphrey, Richard Russell, William Fulbright, Jacob Javits, Mike Mansfield, Ed Muskie, Bob Dole. House leaders like Sam Rayburn, John McCormack, Tip O'Neill, Bob Michel, Gerald Ford.
FEATURES
By Thomas B. Rosenstiel and Thomas B. Rosenstiel,Los Angeles Times | June 30, 1991
Washington -- What Americans remember most about Benjamin C. Bradlee might be that little shimmy of the hipsJason Robards delivered in "All the President's Men."It was a half-tango as Mr. Robards, playing Mr. Bradlee, walked away from Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman, who had just told him they had another story threatening to topple the president of the United States.That is one thing movies do -- confuse the actor with the role. The shimmy may have been Mr. Robards' invention.But it captured something, friends say, about Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee, executive editor of the Washington Post and the most famous newspaper editor of his generation, who recently announced he will retire in September after his 70th birthday.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1995
One colleague described Ben Bradlee as a man who could put his cigarette out on a coffee saucer -- "fine bone china, even" -- and escape being called a boor for it.That's how confident he is of his own legitimacy and personal authority. That's how blinding is the blaze of his charisma.This, of course, is exaggeration. But, then, so is Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee, paragon executive editor of the Washington Post, illuminator of the Pentagon Papers, director of the Post's Watergate coverage, St. George to Richard Nixon's dragon.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 18, 2001
WASHINGTON - In a town supposedly known for its "giants," political and otherwise, if the truth be known there have been few who genuinely have deserved the name over the last half-century. A case can be made for some of the presidents - perhaps Harry Truman, Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, even Ronald Reagan. In Congress, senators like Everett Dirksen, Hubert Humphrey, Richard Russell, William Fulbright, Jacob Javits, Mike Mansfield, Ed Muskie, Bob Dole. House leaders like Sam Rayburn, John McCormack, Tip O'Neill, Bob Michel, Gerald Ford.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Erin Texeira contributed to this article | May 2, 1998
ST. MARY'S CITY -- A showdown in the tiny waterfront town of St. Mary's City ended yesterday when Benjamin C. Bradlee, chairman of the Historic St. Mary's City Commission, told 40 angry residents that the site's popular executive director had resigned.But Bradlee would not tell supporters of Candace Matelic, 45, the circumstances of her departure after less than a year at the head of the state's outdoor living-history museum.The terms of a potential agreement with Matelic barred him from discussing the matter, he told a crowd that confronted him and other members of the commission at its regular meeting.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1995
One colleague described Ben Bradlee as a man who could put his cigarette out on a coffee saucer -- "fine bone china, even" -- and escape being called a boor for it.That's how confident he is of his own legitimacy and personal authority. That's how blinding is the blaze of his charisma.This, of course, is exaggeration. But, then, so is Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee, paragon executive editor of the Washington Post, illuminator of the Pentagon Papers, director of the Post's Watergate coverage, St. George to Richard Nixon's dragon.
NEWS
By William K. Marimow and William K. Marimow,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
In an era when news of complex and important issues is all too often reported in 15-second television news stories and articles offering little nuance and even less analysis, the work of serious journalists - both their formidable triumphs like Watergate and their distressing disasters - reinforce for us all why the First Amendment so forcefully spells out our rights of free speech and a free press.At the core of the First Amendment is the belief that discussion, debate and dissection of public affairs should be - in the words of Supreme Court Justice William Brennan - "uninhibited, robust and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials."
NEWS
January 20, 1992
A couple of delegates were trying to figure out what would happen if the legislature began trimming the budget of Gov. William Donald Schaefer's feel-good program, "Maryland, You Are Beautiful."First, they decided, it would probably turn into the "Maryland, You Are Lovely" campaign. And if they continued cutting, into "Maryland, You Are Pretty Nice."Then, they reasoned, if budget cutters got really serious, it could drop the campaign to "Maryland, You Are Adequate."Finally, they decided, if the cuts got really bad, Mr. Schaefer could call it "Maryland, You Are Fair After Two Beers."
FEATURES
By Thomas B. Rosenstiel and Thomas B. Rosenstiel,Los Angeles Times | June 30, 1991
Washington -- What Americans remember most about Benjamin C. Bradlee might be that little shimmy of the hipsJason Robards delivered in "All the President's Men."It was a half-tango as Mr. Robards, playing Mr. Bradlee, walked away from Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman, who had just told him they had another story threatening to topple the president of the United States.That is one thing movies do -- confuse the actor with the role. The shimmy may have been Mr. Robards' invention.But it captured something, friends say, about Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee, executive editor of the Washington Post and the most famous newspaper editor of his generation, who recently announced he will retire in September after his 70th birthday.
NEWS
By William K. Marimow and William K. Marimow,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
In an era when news of complex and important issues is all too often reported in 15-second television news stories and articles offering little nuance and even less analysis, the work of serious journalists - both their formidable triumphs like Watergate and their distressing disasters - reinforce for us all why the First Amendment so forcefully spells out our rights of free speech and a free press.At the core of the First Amendment is the belief that discussion, debate and dissection of public affairs should be - in the words of Supreme Court Justice William Brennan - "uninhibited, robust and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials."
NEWS
January 18, 1993
FROM the "what might have been" file: Ben Bradlee, who brought fame and journalistic prominence to the Washington Post as its executive editor, nearly went to work for The Baltimore Sun instead.Here's how it happened -- almost -- according to a September 1991 Vanity Fair magazine article on the now-retired editor, written by Peter J. Boyer.After graduating from Harvard University, Bradlee went to work for the New Hampshire Sunday News (1946-1948), started by his college pal, Blair Clark. When the paper was sold to William Loeb's Manchester Union Leader, he was left without a job."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Benjamin C. Bradlee, the editor who transformed the Washington Post into one of the nation's best papers and guided it through Watergate, is retiring as executive editor.He will be succeeded by Managing Editor Leonard Downie, who rose through the editing ranks of the paper after a career as an investigative reporter.Bradlee's retirement is effective Sept. 2, one week after his 70th birthday.Bradlee will become a vice president of the Post and a director of the Washington Post Co., which owns Newsweek magazine, television stations and other newspaper properties.
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