Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBraddock
IN THE NEWS

Braddock

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 22, 2005
On August 20, 2005, at 86 years of age, SISTER THERESE MARIE BRADDOCK, Little Sister of the Poor. Stationed at St. Martin's Home, Catonsville, MD in 1996. Sister Therese made Religious Profession as Little Sister of the Poor on May 29, 1941. She was the beloved daughter of the late Charles L and Stella Rose (nee King) Braddock; beloved sister of Charles Braddock of Shepherdstown, WV and Sister M. Theresa Braddock, S.C.N. of Louisville, KY. Also survived by nieces and nephews.Wake services will be held at St. Martin's Home, 601 Maiden Choce Lane, Catonsville, MD on Tuesday from 3 to 6 P.M. and where a Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Wednesday at 10:30 A.M. Interment in New Cathedral Cemetery.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
The Orioles signed three players to minor league deals Tuesday -- first baseman Travis Ishikawa and left-handed relievers Daniel Schlereth and Zach Braddock -- not only to add to the organization's depth, but executive vice president Dan Duquette believes the three can be contributors in the major leagues. All three have had success in the majors, but obviously come to the Orioles as undervalued commodities in the same vein that players like Nate McLouth and Lew Ford joined the organization and played key roles on a playoff team.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 11, 1998
FireWinfield: Firefighters responded at 12: 52 p.m. Monday to burning electric wires on Braddock and Skidmore roads. Units were out 14 minutes.Pub Date: 3/11/98
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
The Orioles continued to add first base depth on Wednesday, signing Travis Ishikawa, as well as left-handed relievers Daniel Schlereth and Zach Braddock, to minor league contracts with invitations to major league spring training. Ishikawa, 29, recorded a .257/.329/.428 line in 94 games (49 starts) last season with the Brewers, hitting four homers and 30 RBIs in 174 plate appearances. He spent the previous three seasons as a mostly part-time player with the Giants. The left-handed hitting Ishikawa hit .266/.333/.416 and 18 of his 19 career homers against right-handed pitching.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 18, 1998
MIAMI -- Do you pause in the Pledge of Allegiance?You could be violating a proposed Miami-Dade County Public Schools rule.Irked for years by people who pause in the Pledge of Allegiance, longtime school board member Holmes Braddock wants a new zTC rule that schoolchildren be taught to say "one nation under God" in one breath during their voluntary morning ritual.Braddock believes it's incorrect to pause, as many do, between "one nation" and "under God.""When you read it, there's no comma there," said Braddock, 72, an insurance underwriter who has been on the board for 36 years.
NEWS
August 26, 2005
Sister Therese Marie Braddock, a member of the Little Sisters of the Poor who spent her life working with the elderly, died of respiratory failure Saturday at St. Martin's Home in Catonsville. She was 85. Born Therese Marie Braddock in Morganfield, Ky., she was raised there and in Louisville. She entered the Little Sisters order in 1939 and professed her vows in 1941. She came to Baltimore in the early 1940s to work with the elderly at St. Martin's Home, then on Valley Street. She spent more than 60 years working in nursing homes maintained by her order in Richmond, Va., Detroit, Cincinnati and Cleveland.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2005
A noble Depression-era boxer, James J. Braddock went from being washed up, exiled from the sport and struggling to feed his wife and three children to winning the world heavyweight title and the hearts of a struggling nation - all in the span of 12 months. It is a compelling story not only about a boxer, but about a country in one of its darkest hours. But is it so compelling that, 70 years after Braddock's remarkable upset of Max Baer for the heavyweight championship, it's inspired both a book and a movie?
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | March 27, 1991
A federal jury has convicted the owner of a Silver Spring computer software company of conspiracy to bribe a Navy civilian official in return for influence and insider information on minority defense contracts.The jury deliberated less than four hours Monday and yesterday before convicting Conrad Hipkins, 58, the owner and former chairman of Automated Sciences Group Inc. The company itself also was convicted on the charges, which were tied to $120,000 in bribes paid to Richard Ramirez, former director of the Navy's Small And Disadvantaged Business Utilization Office.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 29, 2005
Director Ron Howard and writer Akiva Goldsman have made a specialty of taking chaotic lives and crafting them into sleek and tidy biopics. The team that gave us A Beautiful Mind and now Cinderella Man (opening Friday) have studied the melodramas of Hollywood's Golden Age and realized that audiences respond to clear, decisive lines of action and the calculated release of tension and emotion. These filmmakers know that what they may lose in revelation or insight they gain in pop catharsis and applause.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 3, 2005
Cinderella Man wants to be Seabiscuit on two legs, but lacks the guts and smarts and heart. It tells the fact-based story of James J. Braddock (Russell Crowe), a Jersey City boxer who lost his pro standing and his savings during the Depression. He took dockside jobs to support his wife and three children, and in 1934 had an unexpected and amazing run for the heavyweight crown. Ron Howard, who directed the movie, and Akiva Goldsman and Cliff Hollingsworth, who wrote it, mistake "sober-sided" for "tough-minded."
TRAVEL
By JERRY V. HAINES and JERRY V. HAINES,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 4, 2005
In retrospect, Gen. Edward Braddock's army could have used a weekend at the Nemacolin Adventure Center. In July 1755, while advancing toward the forks of the Ohio River with the intention of ousting the French from Fort Duquesne (now Pittsburgh), the British general and his soldiers were met by heavy fire from French and Indian forces. Losses were heavy; Braddock was mortally wounded. Historian Henry Steele Commager describes the scene: In the face of attack, "there was confusion, mismanagement, terror, panic, and flight."
NEWS
August 26, 2005
Sister Therese Marie Braddock, a member of the Little Sisters of the Poor who spent her life working with the elderly, died of respiratory failure Saturday at St. Martin's Home in Catonsville. She was 85. Born Therese Marie Braddock in Morganfield, Ky., she was raised there and in Louisville. She entered the Little Sisters order in 1939 and professed her vows in 1941. She came to Baltimore in the early 1940s to work with the elderly at St. Martin's Home, then on Valley Street. She spent more than 60 years working in nursing homes maintained by her order in Richmond, Va., Detroit, Cincinnati and Cleveland.
NEWS
August 22, 2005
On August 20, 2005, at 86 years of age, SISTER THERESE MARIE BRADDOCK, Little Sister of the Poor. Stationed at St. Martin's Home, Catonsville, MD in 1996. Sister Therese made Religious Profession as Little Sister of the Poor on May 29, 1941. She was the beloved daughter of the late Charles L and Stella Rose (nee King) Braddock; beloved sister of Charles Braddock of Shepherdstown, WV and Sister M. Theresa Braddock, S.C.N. of Louisville, KY. Also survived by nieces and nephews.Wake services will be held at St. Martin's Home, 601 Maiden Choce Lane, Catonsville, MD on Tuesday from 3 to 6 P.M. and where a Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Wednesday at 10:30 A.M. Interment in New Cathedral Cemetery.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2005
A noble Depression-era boxer, James J. Braddock went from being washed up, exiled from the sport and struggling to feed his wife and three children to winning the world heavyweight title and the hearts of a struggling nation - all in the span of 12 months. It is a compelling story not only about a boxer, but about a country in one of its darkest hours. But is it so compelling that, 70 years after Braddock's remarkable upset of Max Baer for the heavyweight championship, it's inspired both a book and a movie?
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 3, 2005
Cinderella Man wants to be Seabiscuit on two legs, but lacks the guts and smarts and heart. It tells the fact-based story of James J. Braddock (Russell Crowe), a Jersey City boxer who lost his pro standing and his savings during the Depression. He took dockside jobs to support his wife and three children, and in 1934 had an unexpected and amazing run for the heavyweight crown. Ron Howard, who directed the movie, and Akiva Goldsman and Cliff Hollingsworth, who wrote it, mistake "sober-sided" for "tough-minded."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 29, 2005
Director Ron Howard and writer Akiva Goldsman have made a specialty of taking chaotic lives and crafting them into sleek and tidy biopics. The team that gave us A Beautiful Mind and now Cinderella Man (opening Friday) have studied the melodramas of Hollywood's Golden Age and realized that audiences respond to clear, decisive lines of action and the calculated release of tension and emotion. These filmmakers know that what they may lose in revelation or insight they gain in pop catharsis and applause.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | September 25, 1992
On paper, "Woops!" looks like the dumbest idea of the new season.But on screen, the new Fox series plays kind of smart and funny.OK, maybe not really smart. Maybe it's just that its premise has so little promise you're surprised to see it work at all. But the pilot, which airs at 11:30 Sunday night on WBFF (Channel 45), does have some good moments.The premise is a nuclear war has occurred by accident and left only six survivors. The six meet in a farmhouse and set out to start a new society.
FEATURES
By LARRY BINGHAM and LARRY BINGHAM,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2000
MIDDLETOWN -- When the old man wasn't on his porch, the entire valley knew something was wrong. Dawn Rosenthal certainly did. She sat at the intersection waiting for the light to change and wondered if he was OK. For as long as she had lived in town, he sat on his porch and waved. He was there in the mornings when she took the kids to Frederick for swim team. He was there in the evenings when the commuters from Washington and Baltimore came home. In warm weather, it seemed he was there all day. Everybody who came over Braddock Mountain drove past him. The gray porch with peeling paint was 50 feet from the road, and the old man knew who was running late for work and whether a school bus was behind schedule and who had forgotten something and turned around.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.