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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 25, 2004
Ray Bradbury has been raging over the way filmmaker Michael Moore alluded to Bradbury's anti-book-burning novel Fahrenheit 451 in the title of Moore's documentary Fahrenheit 9/11. Bradbury told a Swedish journalist that Moore is a "dreadful" and "dishonest" man and said that in his mind Moore plagiarized the title. Bradbury said his fury "has nothing to do with my political views." But a glance at the 50th anniversary edition of Fahrenheit 451 (Ballantine/Del Rey) suggests Bradbury is opposed to anyone using his fiction to make simplistic political points.
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By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | February 26, 2009
Today, in another helpful public service provided by this column, I recommend the perfect book to curl up with on a cold winter's day. Regular visitors to this space will recall that in recent years I have recommended a number of terrific novels for beach reading, among them such classics as James M. Cain's The Postman Always Rings Twice and Charles Portis' The Dog of the South. But forget about the beach. Look, the way this economy is going, you won't have enough money to go to a movie this summer, never mind the beach.
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1996
At 75, Ray Bradbury, the grand master of fantasy and science fiction, still starts each day with the "theater of the morning" playing in his head."I hear these voices, just when I awaken at 6 or 7 o'clock, half in and half out of sleep," he says. "I hear these voices talking, and I do what they say."He types up what his voices say on his IBM Wheelwriter, and they become short stories and novels and poems and essays.He loves his Wheelwriter because it recalls for him an old-time manual typewriter: black letters appear on white paper.
NEWS
By Joanna Brenner | July 6, 2008
Jonathan Leshnoff has been the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra's composer-in-residence for two years, but his works have been featured every season since 2005. His trombone concerto will be performed in October, and he will have a CD coming out in February, featuring his violin concerto. "With an orchestra, you have an infinite amount of colors to play with," said Leshnoff. "It's like being a kid in a toy store. It's an infinite amount of fun and exhilaration." "Fahrenheit 451" by Ray Bradbury I find it curious how this novel, written in the 1950s, speaks so directly to me today.
FEATURES
By A Reader's Guide to Twentieth Century Writers | November 8, 1998
Ray BradburyBradbury writes unlike other science fiction writers in that he steers away from writing about technology.Once, after Bradbury had made a strong name for himself, he, on the day before his wedding day, burned a million of his words that he felt were not good enough.Bradbury is well-known for his volume of short stories, "The Martian Chronicles," and also for "Fahrenheit 451," which projects the future's government as banning and burning books. Bradbury is considered America's best science fiction writer.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
SALT LAKE CITY - As it turned out, the worst place Apolo Anton Ohno could have been going into the final 50 meters of last night's 1,000-meter final in short-track speed skating was in the lead. Last place, in fact, would have been ideal. Just seconds from claiming his first Olympic gold medal, Ohno got tangled up and undercut by China's Li Jiajun, causing the skating equivalent of a four-car pileup. Australia's Steven Bradbury, good fortune's man of the hour, casually avoided the carnage and won a race in which he likely would have finished last.
NEWS
By Joanna Brenner | July 6, 2008
Jonathan Leshnoff has been the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra's composer-in-residence for two years, but his works have been featured every season since 2005. His trombone concerto will be performed in October, and he will have a CD coming out in February, featuring his violin concerto. "With an orchestra, you have an infinite amount of colors to play with," said Leshnoff. "It's like being a kid in a toy store. It's an infinite amount of fun and exhilaration." "Fahrenheit 451" by Ray Bradbury I find it curious how this novel, written in the 1950s, speaks so directly to me today.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,sun reporter | February 8, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Accusing Democratic lawmakers of turning the confirmation process into "a never-ending political game," President Bush urged the Senate yesterday to vote promptly on more than 180 languishing nominees, including Maryland U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein, who was selected by Bush last fall for a federal judgeship. Flanked by Rosenstein and several other nominees and senators in the East Room of the White House, Bush said the justice system and other important government functions were suffering because of Senate delays.
NEWS
By Dale Eisman and Dale Eisman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 18, 2002
WASHINGTON - On Star Trek, Mr. Spock sometimes subdued adversaries with a quick grip at the base of the neck. Even the fiercest warrior would crumple at the "Vulcan nerve pinch," and the technique saved Federation forces from many a firefight. Now a Norfolk, Va.-based military command, encouraged at the Pentagon's highest levels, is testing a way to help 21st century U.S. forces quickly locate and use other kinds of pressure points to paralyze foes and stop battles before they start. If it works, the experiment could lead to the placement of elite teams of military planners and analysts across the globe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Holahan and Catherine Holahan,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 12, 2004
DUMONT, N.J. - Darrin Bradbury's music CD is titled Boy Without a Plan. But the 17-year-old Dumont High School junior actually has a carefully laid-out strategy for becoming a famous musician. The singer/songwriter/guitarist is using new Web-based music companies to market, promote and distribute his 10-track album in the hope of getting attention from a major record label. "Everything is on the Web," Darrin said. "It's real easy to just give out a Web site." And his plan just might work.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,sun reporter | February 8, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Accusing Democratic lawmakers of turning the confirmation process into "a never-ending political game," President Bush urged the Senate yesterday to vote promptly on more than 180 languishing nominees, including Maryland U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein, who was selected by Bush last fall for a federal judgeship. Flanked by Rosenstein and several other nominees and senators in the East Room of the White House, Bush said the justice system and other important government functions were suffering because of Senate delays.
NEWS
By Digby Diehl | September 9, 2007
Now and Forever By Ray Bradbury William Morrow / 224 pages / $24.95 I have had the pleasure of listening to Ray Bradbury for more than 40 years - in speeches, interviews and late-night conversations over a glass of wine. His energy and exuberance rarely falter, and listeners almost always go away inspired. That first afternoon in 1964 in his Wilshire Boulevard office, we sat on the floor and played with some of the same "toys" he still plays with today in the basement of his home: miniature dinosaurs and spaceships, Bullwinkle Moose and comic books of every description.
NEWS
By Lucinda Michele Knapp and Lucinda Michele Knapp,Los Angeles Times | October 22, 2006
Farewell Summer Ray Bradbury William Morrow / 224 pages / $24.95 "Is death being on a ship sailing and all your folks left back on the shore?" asks 13-year-old Doug of his grandfather in Ray Bradbury's latest, Farewell Summer. "That's about it, Doug," replies the grandfather - and in Doug's head "the storm began." It's the storm of adolescence, the turmoil of loss, and it hangs low over Farewell Summer, Bradbury's long-delayed follow-up to his 1957 semi-autobiographical Dandelion Wine, which featured a 12-year-old Douglas Spaulding in a handful of short stories that read like miniatures of intricate clockwork, each perfectly machined and chiming with the cogs and gears of idiosyncratic characters, building into a contraption that was as much a time machine as the mysterious creation that lived in the garage of a town denizen.
NEWS
June 24, 2006
Anne Arundel: Severn Army sergeant dies in Iraq crash Army Staff Sgt. Heathe N. Craig of Severn was killed in a UH-60 helicopter crash Wednesday near Naray, Afghanistan, the Department of Defense announced yesterday. The accident was caused by a faulty hoist, the department said. Craig, 28, was trying to rescue Pfc. Brian J. Bradbury, 22, of Saint Joseph, Mo., who had encountered enemy forces and fire during combat operations, according to a Pentagon statement. Bradbury died in the operation.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 2, 2005
A Sound of Thunder is retro in a refreshing sort of way, a return to those sci-fi films of the 1950s, filled with cheesy special effects and over-the-top acting, but with a gem of an idea at its core, and all done with just enough wit and inventiveness to keep audiences in the cheap seats happy. When the Ray Bradbury short story on which the film is based was published in 1952, the idea that the death of a butterfly 60 million years ago could change the present in ways unimaginable was an intriguing novelty.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 25, 2004
Ray Bradbury has been raging over the way filmmaker Michael Moore alluded to Bradbury's anti-book-burning novel Fahrenheit 451 in the title of Moore's documentary Fahrenheit 9/11. Bradbury told a Swedish journalist that Moore is a "dreadful" and "dishonest" man and said that in his mind Moore plagiarized the title. Bradbury said his fury "has nothing to do with my political views." But a glance at the 50th anniversary edition of Fahrenheit 451 (Ballantine/Del Rey) suggests Bradbury is opposed to anyone using his fiction to make simplistic political points.
NEWS
June 24, 2006
Anne Arundel: Severn Army sergeant dies in Iraq crash Army Staff Sgt. Heathe N. Craig of Severn was killed in a UH-60 helicopter crash Wednesday near Naray, Afghanistan, the Department of Defense announced yesterday. The accident was caused by a faulty hoist, the department said. Craig, 28, was trying to rescue Pfc. Brian J. Bradbury, 22, of Saint Joseph, Mo., who had encountered enemy forces and fire during combat operations, according to a Pentagon statement. Bradbury died in the operation.
NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE GREEN SHADOWS, WHITE WHALE. Ray Bradbury; drawings by Edward Sorel. Knopf. 269 pages. $21. and SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE GREEN SHADOWS, WHITE WHALE. Ray Bradbury; drawings by Edward Sorel. Knopf. 269 pages. $21.,LOS ANGELES TIMES SAHARA. Clive Cussler. Simon & Schuster. 541 pages. $23 | June 14, 1992
LUCY PEALE.Colby Rodowsky.Farrar, Straus and Giroux.167 pages. $15.The heroine of the 12th young adult novel by Baltimore author Colby Rodowsky is a girl with a problem that won't go away. Lucy Peale is 17 years old, pregnant as the result of a date rape, and her fundamentalist preacher father wants her to come forward at the next service and confess to the congregation: "We're going to listen as Lucy Peale says, Thank you, Jesus, for giving me this sin and giving me a way to show that even a Jezebel can turn her life around," he commands her.Instead, she escapes to nearby Ocean City, where she meets a young man named Jake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Holahan and Catherine Holahan,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 12, 2004
DUMONT, N.J. - Darrin Bradbury's music CD is titled Boy Without a Plan. But the 17-year-old Dumont High School junior actually has a carefully laid-out strategy for becoming a famous musician. The singer/songwriter/guitarist is using new Web-based music companies to market, promote and distribute his 10-track album in the hope of getting attention from a major record label. "Everything is on the Web," Darrin said. "It's real easy to just give out a Web site." And his plan just might work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | December 29, 2002
Let's All Kill Constance: A Novel, by Ray Bradbury. HarperCollins. 224 pages. $23.95. Let's All Kill Constance calls itself "a novel." It opens as Hollywood noir, at its center a boozy screenwriter at his beach house on a "dark and stormy night." Ray Bradbury the science fiction writer appears to be sending up the detective genre of Hammett and Chandler, and the notion of genre in general. Bradbury's 80th some odd book is in fact neither of these things. It's a memoir disguised as a parody of genre, in which the author explores what he has achieved and how he might face with equanimity the end of both his writing and his actual life.
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