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By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,sun reporter | August 21, 2007
Four decades ago, an 11-year-old girl sat up front during a play at Center Stage. It was an English-language production of Moliere's comedy Tartuffe, and Mary Jo Salter reacted to the proceedings the way other girls her age might to the latest Nancy Drew mystery. "I was in the second row center, and people were speaking in rhyming couplets," says Salter, now 53. "I'd just never had so much fun in my life."
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By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,sun reporter | August 21, 2007
Four decades ago, an 11-year-old girl sat up front during a play at Center Stage. It was an English-language production of Moliere's comedy Tartuffe, and Mary Jo Salter reacted to the proceedings the way other girls her age might to the latest Nancy Drew mystery. "I was in the second row center, and people were speaking in rhyming couplets," says Salter, now 53. "I'd just never had so much fun in my life."
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NEWS
By J. Bottum and J. Bottum,Special to the Sun | January 12, 1997
"The Friends of Freeland," by Brad Leithauser. 528 pages. $26.To understand why Brad Leithauser's latest book deserves solid praise, you have to understand just how hard it is to write a competent novel. America is full of professional architects, trained people who know how to fit a bathroom into a house and where the kitchen ought to go. But there just aren't that many novelists around who really understand how to build a book.And yet, the competence that is Leithauser's strength ends up his weakness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clarinda Harriss and By Clarinda Harriss,Special to the Sun | March 31, 2002
Darlington's Fall, a novel in verse, by Brad Leithauser. Knopf. 311 pages. $25. All life divides into two kingdoms. Such is the opening sentence of naturalist Russell Darlington's biology treatise, as we learn by delving into poet / novelist / essayist Brad Leithauser's 2002 verse novel Darlington's Fall, the statement is wrong, and both the book and its characters are fictional. But the debate over life's kingdoms -- what and how many they are -- may be both real and crucial. Darlington's two kingdoms are Animals and Plants, a notion "so simple" that "You almost have to laugh."
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By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1995
Gore Vidal can wear because he's so querulous; he's best taken in small doses. E. B. White is always welcome because of his gentleness and quirky curiosity.For me, a successful collection of essays has the same attractiveness as having dinner with an engaging companion. In this collection, Brad Leithauser proves consistently companionable. His approach is intelligent, informal and refreshingly lacking in ego.The author of three novels and three collections of poems, Mr. Leithauser also produces first-rate criticism, consistently informed and thoughtful.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clarinda Harriss and By Clarinda Harriss,Special to the Sun | March 31, 2002
Darlington's Fall, a novel in verse, by Brad Leithauser. Knopf. 311 pages. $25. All life divides into two kingdoms. Such is the opening sentence of naturalist Russell Darlington's biology treatise, as we learn by delving into poet / novelist / essayist Brad Leithauser's 2002 verse novel Darlington's Fall, the statement is wrong, and both the book and its characters are fictional. But the debate over life's kingdoms -- what and how many they are -- may be both real and crucial. Darlington's two kingdoms are Animals and Plants, a notion "so simple" that "You almost have to laugh."
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk | October 30, 1994
Who believes in ghosts?"Everybody does," says Brad Leithauser, editor of "The Norton Book of Ghost Stories."Whether you agree or disagree with him, you don't want to miss his anthology of short stories guaranteed to send chills up and down your spine.It's one of many books on the market today guaranteed to raise the hairs on the back on your neck and make you look cautiously over your shoulder.Of course, there are the old favorites: Bram Stoker's "Dracula," Stephen King's "Salem's Lot" and Anne Rice's "Interview with the Vampire," plus scores of true-life accounts.
FEATURES
By Maude McDaniel and Maude McDaniel,Contributing Writer | July 13, 1993
C. S. Lewis once wrote, in effect, that if you're going to see ghosts, you'd better believe in them. Terry Seward did, but he didn't (perhaps) in this capricious, unsettling novel.A slight, 38-year-old communications lawyer in a Washington firm, Terry is generous, good-humored, "a very regular guy." Picking up the pieces of his wrecked life after his wife's accidental death by drowning, he's startled a year later in a Virginia vacation cabin to see "Betsy herself, on the threshold of the dark . . . while the lights go humming-humming," chanting "softly but unmistakably 'Terry, Terry, no one's fault.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | September 25, 2007
It's one of my favorite days of the year, the announcement of the MacArthur "genius" grants. With its mix of brains and bucks, the annual awarding of the grants is something like Powerball for the deserving. If it's not quite a mega-millions payout, getting $500,000 plus the label of "genius" seems like the perfect comeback to that old taunt, "If you're so smart, why aren't you rich?" "The thing it really did," said Ellen Silbergeld, a professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health who won a grant in 1993, "is give you a sense of empowerment and daring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to the Sun | October 3, 1999
''We're starting to wonder whether anybody really wants to read criticism anymore," the culture editor of a well-known magazine recently told me. Time was when I would have been shocked by such a statement -- but times and tastes are changing, and editors are taking note. For years, American magazines and newspapers have been slowly cutting back on review space and running more personality-driven features instead; Talk, Tina Brown's new magazine, publishes no criticism of any kind, save for an occasional book review.
NEWS
By J. Bottum and J. Bottum,Special to the Sun | January 12, 1997
"The Friends of Freeland," by Brad Leithauser. 528 pages. $26.To understand why Brad Leithauser's latest book deserves solid praise, you have to understand just how hard it is to write a competent novel. America is full of professional architects, trained people who know how to fit a bathroom into a house and where the kitchen ought to go. But there just aren't that many novelists around who really understand how to build a book.And yet, the competence that is Leithauser's strength ends up his weakness.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1995
Gore Vidal can wear because he's so querulous; he's best taken in small doses. E. B. White is always welcome because of his gentleness and quirky curiosity.For me, a successful collection of essays has the same attractiveness as having dinner with an engaging companion. In this collection, Brad Leithauser proves consistently companionable. His approach is intelligent, informal and refreshingly lacking in ego.The author of three novels and three collections of poems, Mr. Leithauser also produces first-rate criticism, consistently informed and thoughtful.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk | October 30, 1994
Who believes in ghosts?"Everybody does," says Brad Leithauser, editor of "The Norton Book of Ghost Stories."Whether you agree or disagree with him, you don't want to miss his anthology of short stories guaranteed to send chills up and down your spine.It's one of many books on the market today guaranteed to raise the hairs on the back on your neck and make you look cautiously over your shoulder.Of course, there are the old favorites: Bram Stoker's "Dracula," Stephen King's "Salem's Lot" and Anne Rice's "Interview with the Vampire," plus scores of true-life accounts.
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