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By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | April 27, 1995
Robin Marie Williams' $15,000 bracelet -- a diamond-studded engagement gift from her fiance -- disappeared two weeks ago as she left the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse after serving jury duty.It was lost forever, she thought.But today, Ms. Williams and her bracelet were reunited -- this time forever, she said -- after phone calls from a man who said he had "something you may have lost.""This is so unbelieveable," Ms. Williams, 34, said hours before the bracelet was brought to her Harbor Court apartment by Ahmet Hisim, a prosecutor at the courthouse.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Following the deaths of two concert goers in Columbia earlier this month, promoters of a traveling music festival have banned a number of items including bright, decorative, chunky bracelets known as "kandi," which is popular among electronic dance music fans but some say is linked to the drug culture. Tyler Fox Viscardi, 20, of Raleigh, N.C., and Daniel Anders, 17, of Woodbridge, Va., both died after attending the Mad Decent Block Party music festival on Aug. 1 at Merriweather Post Pavilion.
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NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,special to the sun | December 14, 2003
Charm bracelets are so handy for holding memories -- a trinket from the beach here, a baby shoe there. The jumble of shapes creates a pleasing tinkle when worn on the wrist and presents a wonderful entry into conversations with strangers. Annapolis jewelry artist Robin Papadopoulos has created a charm bracelet that's charming and oh so very Naval Academy. The bracelet features exotic beads in navy blue and yellow (U.S. Naval Academy colors), and interspersed with charms of such Naval Academy symbols as a midshipman's hat, an anchor, the goat and the Naval Academy star.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Young World Store on Liberty Heights Avenue has been cited by the Baltimore City Health Department for selling children's bracelets with excessive levels of lead, the agency announced Thursday. The agency said lead levels in the multicolored bangle bracelet are 25 times the amount permitted. This is the third time in three years that the store at 2401 Liberty Heights Ave. has been cited for lead violations, according to the health department, which alerted the Consumer Product Safety Commission to the most recent findings.
FEATURES
July 29, 1999
Our favorite new bracelet isn't made of sterling silver. Dainty charms don't dangle prettily from it; there are no jewels to catch the light. The Bracelet of Life is just a strip of paper -- but it sure catches attention.Its colored zones make it a handy tool for doctors helping out in global crises, from droughts to civil wars. Here's how it works:Doctors slip a bracelet on a child's arm and quickly see how close that child is to starving. Wrap the bracelet around the arm of a well-nourished child, slip the tab through its slot and pull, and the tab stops on the green zone.
FEATURES
By Young Chang and Young Chang,Contributing Writer | August 16, 1998
Two Virginia babies were switched at birth three years ago, the world learned recently. Since then, talk has abounded: How often does this happen, why and how?Answers are only speculative, but the statistics are startling.About 28,000 babies get switched in hospitals every year, temporarily or permanently, out of four million births, says Nicholas Webb, vice president of technology for Talon Medical Limited, a San Antonio, Texas-based vendor of a new high-tech ID bracelet for newborns. He says his figures are from a 1996 study by Inter/Action Associates, a Las Vegas, Nev.-based security consulting firm.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
City officials have cited two local businesses for selling children's jewelry that contains lead levels in excess of the federal standard of 300 parts per million. Rainbow Kids was selling a Princess and the Frog necklace and bracelet set, and Youngworld Store was selling a Princess Expressions purple crown bracelet that violated standards. Both are in Mondawmin Mall and will no longer be permitted to sell the items. The Baltimore Health Department tested seven products in June for lead, a neurotoxin that can cause cognitive impairment and neurological problems in small doses and more severe illness and death at higher doses.
NEWS
December 8, 2009
The Baltimore City Health Department has ordered two city businesses to stop selling children's jewelry found to have levels of lead in excess of what the city allows. The items include a "Gymnastics bracelet," sold at Beauty Zone, 231 N. Eutaw St., and a "Dora" bracelet and earring set sold at Choice Corner Accessories & Fine Gifts, 400 W. Lexington St. Both items were found to have lead levels in excess of 600 parts per million, higher than the city limit. For more information, consumers can go to baltimorehealth.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Young World Store on Liberty Heights Avenue has been cited by the Baltimore City Health Department for selling children's bracelets with excessive levels of lead, the agency announced Thursday. The agency said lead levels in the multicolored bangle bracelet are 25 times the amount permitted. This is the third time in three years that the store at 2401 Liberty Heights Ave. has been cited for lead violations, according to the health department, which alerted the Consumer Product Safety Commission to the most recent findings.
FEATURES
By Karen Harrop (K.H.) | April 25, 1991
* Go for the glitter. This year's party earrings are long and sexy and fun, says Elaine Suls of John Sims. Colored or icy clear crystals, as well as rhinestones, are making news this summer. "We're also selling lots of pearls," she says.A pair of crystal flower blossoms are an updated alternative to the shoulder duster earring.* Pair your earrings with a icy or frosted Lucite bracelet or a colored crystal bracelet."The wide, understated gold or silver colored cuff bracelet also complements this year's fashions," says Diane Lee of Octavia.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
It looks like an expensive bracelet, but the contraption laced in titanium beads gets placed around the esophagus rather than the wrist. The LINX Reflux Management System is a new treatment for acid reflux, a digestive order that causes heartburn, nagging cough and other chronic symptoms in 10 million to 20 million U.S. patients. The condition occurs when a weak valve where the esophagus meets the stomach, known as a sphincter, won't close properly, allowing bile and acid to wash up. Some doctors say the device, approved by the FDA last year, shows promise as an alternative for patients who don't find relief from drugs that reduce acid in the stomach, but don't want to get major surgery.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| April 16, 2013
Oh, that was a fun day about 10 years ago when we fed our infant son yogurt and then watched his face unexpectedly blow up like a red-spotted balloon. A few years and a few EpiPens later, he was allergy free and I could stop reading labels like a detective. But for families still dealing with allergies, these bracelets from Hope Paige might come in handy.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
As soon as the confetti dropped in New Orleans, Fred Fillah launched production of thousands of T-shirts adorned with a smiling Ray Lewis standing amid that confetti shower. "We've been printing … all night," said Fillah, president of Fanatics Only LLC, a Maryland T-shirt company licensed by the NFL Players Association. Businesses of all sizes are looking to cash in on the Ravens' success. For small-time online sellers and major international brands alike, the end of the Super Bowl means the beginning of promotional tie-ins, trying to profit from the good feelings that come along with a Super Bowl win. Tide laundry detergent, for instance, was one of the brands that invoked the Ravens during its Super Bowl commercial.
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
The wristband caught his attention several times throughout a typical day. If he took a shower, the blue silicone bracelet stayed on. When he had basketball practice or a game, he moved it from his wrist to his ankle. Pictures of red, yellow and blue puzzle pieces surrounded a simple message Jordan Latham read whenever he glanced at his wrist: I love someone with autism. As the former City center labored through his freshman season at Xavier two years ago, the bracelet kept him connected to home.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
When Clara Henry was 3, she fell off her bed and hit the corner of a table in her room, breaking her skull in three places. She underwent surgery and stayed at the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Johns Hopkins Hospital for a week. Recovery took a year. When she thinks back on that time, Clara, now 7 and a second-grader at Centennial Lane Elementary School in Ellicott City, remembers that it was "sort of scary," that she wore a paper gown and that she had a homemade blanket donated by a group called Project Linus.
FEATURES
By Lauren Schein, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
One of the many benefits of receiving that long awaited engagement ring is the ease of daily accessorizing. I have always admired the girls who can effortlessly and flawlessly pair the perfect necklace/scarf/belt with a simple outfit, instantly elevating it from boring to stylish. But as much as I compliment and admire these embellishment- savvy ladies, I don't foresee myself ever having the patience for that extra 30 seconds to latch onto my daily routine. I also have a small problem called "champagne taste on a beer budget" where almost every piece of jewelry that catches my eye is comically out of my price range.
NEWS
By [CATHERINE SUDUE] | May 4, 2008
DIRECTOR OF THE BALTIMORE MUSEUM OF ART DOREEN BOLGER AFTER 10 YEARS ON THE JOB, Doreen Bolger says she still finds it thrilling. "I am most excited when I see people walking through galleries engaged in art and finding meaning to them," she says. Currently she is busy working on the Janet & Walter Sondheim Prize art exhibition, in which one of six finalists will be awarded $25,000. "We have such great artists in this city," says Bolger, who resides in Charles Village. 1 Henri Matisse cutout for the BMA "The BMA has the world's largest collection of his work, but we don't have a cutout.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | September 27, 1994
Baltimore probably wasn't the best city for James Fedal to visit and pawn a $12,000 bracelet.First of all, the clerk at Baltimore Gold and Silver, a downtown hockshop, only gave him $765 for the 14-carat, diamond-encrusted bauble.And second, police said, the suspect willingly allowed the clerk to copy down all kinds of personal information from his driver's license, as is required by law.All of which led police to get an arrest warrant for Mr. Fedal, 32, of Forest Park, Ill., charging him with armed robbery.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 2, 2011
About that five bucks some pay-it-forward stranger advanced me at the Maryland toll booth on Interstate-95: I spent it at Starbucks, but not for the Salted Caramel Mocha Frappuccino. Instead, I bought a Create Jobs for USA bracelet. In fact, I bought two. That's $10, tax-deductible, with every penny going toward a smart, new effort to help small businesses across the country expand or get started, and put people to work. It's a sweet end-run on Congress and big corporations. If you have any affinity at all with the Occupy Wall Street movement, if you are outraged that major U.S. corporations are sitting on trillions in cash balances while reaping grotesque profits at a time when millions of Americans can't find work, then you should get a bracelet at Starbucks, too. Or, if you can afford it, buy 10 and hand them out to friends, and ask every recipient to do the same.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
City officials have cited two local businesses for selling children's jewelry that contains lead levels in excess of the federal standard of 300 parts per million. Rainbow Kids was selling a Princess and the Frog necklace and bracelet set, and Youngworld Store was selling a Princess Expressions purple crown bracelet that violated standards. Both are in Mondawmin Mall and will no longer be permitted to sell the items. The Baltimore Health Department tested seven products in June for lead, a neurotoxin that can cause cognitive impairment and neurological problems in small doses and more severe illness and death at higher doses.
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