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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | October 8, 2007
Feeling confused about BRAC? The logistical, financial and political machinations surrounding the national military base realignment and closure process are complicated enough. But throw in the acronym-steeped terminology government officials use and it's enough to make an average citizen's head spin. For example, someone who states that "DBED told CSSC that BRAC will send C4ISR jobs to APG and DISA jobs to FGGM" is sure to leave the listener flummoxed. But not to worry. CSSC - that's the Chesapeake Science and Security Corridor - has published "BRACANYMS," a booklet intended to bring linguistic clarity to BRAC discourse.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Reporter | February 5, 2007
Resurfacing key roads. Giving more money to a nonprofit that markets city housing. Creating a "BRAC Stat." These are among the steps Baltimore officials say they are taking to ensure that the city captures its share of the growth expected to come to Maryland from the military base realignment and closure process, or BRAC. "We will make sure we capitalize on the opportunity," said Andrew B. Frank, the city's deputy mayor for economic development, who is heading up a multiagency city effort on BRAC.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | September 13, 2007
As county and state officials came to Edgewood last night to update citizens on base-relocation planning, a topic on the minds of many in audience was one that has vexed the community in recent months: crime. Several of the questions that came from those in the crowd of 200 that turned out at Edgewood High School raised concerns about whether funding for police initiatives would lose out to money for improvements in roads, schools and infrastructure. Three of the four killings in the county this year have occurred in Edgewood, and gang activity has been an issue with which residents and police have grappled.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | July 3, 2008
WASHINGTON - When President Bush breaks ground today for a new Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Maryland, Phil Alperson may be thinking about how Route 355 is going to handle the thousands of additional staff, patients and visitors the hospital is expected to draw each day. "You cannot increase the personnel ... by one-third, or double the hospital load to nearly 1 million visits to the campus each year, without having a significant impact...
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | October 5, 2008
The thousands of new employees coming to military-related jobs in Harford County in the next three years will likely grapple with traffic congestion caused by inadequate roads, failing intersections and insufficient mass transit. Maryland's revenue shortfall has delayed several key projects that were designed to relieve commuter traffic to and from Aberdeen Proving Ground, which is expected to grow by about 10,000 jobs within the next three years. BRAC, the nationwide military base expansion set for a 2011 completion at APG, will bring those new employees to the county.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | September 11, 2009
A federal Government Accountability Office report says Maryland may need an additional $315 million to $470 million to complete transportation projects near three military facilities that will gain thousands of jobs under the Pentagon's base realignment program. The newly released study, which reports to Congress on the impact of the Base Realignment and Closure process on 18 communities nationwide, noted that Maryland has already allocated almost $95 million for intersection improvements near Aberdeen Proving Ground, Fort Meade and the Bethesda National Naval Center.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | July 22, 2007
Three Republican state senators are demanding that any decisions about the impact of the impending expansion at Aberdeen Proving Ground on the county be made in a public forum. The senators representing Harford County wrote to Democratic Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, who is leading the administration's base-realignment planning effort, complaining of closed-door meetings, including the most recent one July 13 in Aberdeen. Republican Sens. Nancy Jacobs, J. Robert Hooper and Andrew P. Harris called the sessions "troubling and undemocratic" in a letter to Brown dated Thursday.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | May 11, 2009
In a sign that the nationwide military realignment known as BRAC is on the verge of transforming life in Harford County, authorities celebrated last week the completion of a 14-month, $23 million upgrade to the most widely used entrance to Aberdeen Proving Ground. The expansion of the 715 gate, the entrance at the end of Maryland Route 715, also known as Short Lane, is the first BRAC-related project to be completed in the state, said Karen Holt, BRAC manager for the Chesapeake Science and Security Corridor, a consortium formed to ease BRAC-related growing pains.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
A construction worker was killed while working at Fort Meade on Monday, a spokesman said. The man, who has not been identified, was helping to complete the Defense Media Activity building, part of Base Realignment and Closure, or BRAC, construction when he died in a work-related accident, said Fort Meade spokesman Chad Jones. Jones said he was unaware of how the death occurred, but said the man was taken to Laurel Regional Hospital where he was pronounced dead. He was employed by Hensel Phelps Construction Co. based in Chantilly, Va., which did not immediately return a call seeking comment Tuesday night.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Jessica Anderson,SUN REPORTER | June 17, 2008
For two years, Quinhon N. Goodlowe had been searching for her first home. The Lombard Middle School teacher found it in the Townes at Orchard Ridge, a new community to which she plans to move in July. Goodlowe said she had a difficult time finding affordable housing in a city neighborhood where she felt safe. At Townes at Orchard Ridge she found a new house in a new community that matched her income. Townes at Orchard Ridge is being built on the sites of the former Freedom Village Apartments and Claremont Homes public housing complex in Northeast Baltimore.
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