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NEWS
May 10, 2011
A May 2, 2011 letter to the editor mischaracterizes a bill awaiting Gov. Martin O'Malley's signature on the chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA). The bill does not, as stated, ban infant formula infant formula and baby food packaging that contains more than 0.5 parts per billion (ppb) of BPA. Instead, the bill calls for the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to deliver a report to the General Assembly next year on federal research and regulatory activities related to BPA, specifically addressing the availability and safety of substitutes for BPA used in containers for infant formula.
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FEATURES
April 2, 2014
Squeezable yogurt and fruit pouches are convenient, but all that packaging is not so eco-friendly. Baltimore parents Jordan and Alexis Takas have solved the problem with EZ Squeezees - refillable, reusable, and dishwasher-safe food pouches. BPA and phthalate-free, the pouches will last for about 15-25 uses. Fill them with pureed fruits and veggies, smoothies, or whatever you can dream up. Each three-pouch set ($9.99) saves more than 90 disposable pouches from landfills. Sold at Wegmans, Whole Foods or online at ezsqueezees.com . - Abigail Green, For The Baltimore Sun
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NEWS
February 26, 2010
Kudos to the Maryland legislature for recognizing the health risks associated with exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) and taking action to prevent children from being exposed to this chemical ("Senate OKs BPA ban in bottles and cups for young children," Feb. 25). Unfortunately, BPA exposure does not only affect our children but can also have negative health impacts on both women and men across their lifespan. As a nurse-midwife, I am especially concerned about the possible impacts of fetal exposure to this chemical that is used in so many products.
NEWS
August 26, 2013
The article "When science is for hire" (Aug 23) raises important issues about consumer protections from hazardous chemicals and the need for better controls on industry-sponsored research. Consumers are the losers when researchers, industry, scientific journals, and in the Eastman Chemical case even the courts, cannot agree on standards of objectivity in assessing public health risks. The story illustrates why government funding of research is still needed and should be increased.
NEWS
August 26, 2013
The article "When science is for hire" (Aug 23) raises important issues about consumer protections from hazardous chemicals and the need for better controls on industry-sponsored research. Consumers are the losers when researchers, industry, scientific journals, and in the Eastman Chemical case even the courts, cannot agree on standards of objectivity in assessing public health risks. The story illustrates why government funding of research is still needed and should be increased.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 26, 2010
A bill to ban the chemical bisphenol-A from baby bottles and infants' cups passed its final hurdle in the General Assembly on Thursday. The Senate passed the BPA bill 46-0, after the House passed an identical bill last week. Gov. Martin O'Malley hasn't reviewed the legislation, but a spokesman said he doesn't believe the governor would have objections. If the bill is signed, Maryland would become the fourth state to ban the chemical linked to developmental problems in young children, reproductive troubles in women and other diseases.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | June 11, 2008
WASHINGTON - Parents don't need to throw away plastic baby bottles containing the chemical BPA, government scientists told Congress yesterday, despite mounting concerns about toxic side effects. "We do not see a need to change baby bottles," Norris Alderson, a Food and Drug Administration official, said. Michael A. Babich, a chemist at the Consumer Product Safety Commission, agreed that there was no reason to stop using the bottles. The two officials said evidence of danger from BPA was too limited to corroborate concerns.
NEWS
By Deborah L. Shelton and Deborah L. Shelton,Chicago Tribune | September 17, 2008
CHICAGO - The debate over the safety of a chemical ubiquitous in the lives of Americans took center stage at a scientific hearing of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration yesterday as federal officials, scientists and health advocates gave vastly different assessments of the effects of exposure to bisphenol A. Bisphenol A, commonly known as BPA, is used extensively in epoxy resins lining food and beverage containers and in polycarbonate plastics used...
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | February 3, 2010
Lawmakers in Annapolis are being asked to ban products containing two chemicals that have triggered serious concerns about toxicity. On Tuesday afternoon, the House Health and Government Operations Committee aired HB33, which would ban the sale, manufacture or distribution of children's toys or child-care articles such as baby bottles made with bisphenol-A, or BPA. The bill, sponsored by Del. Jim Hubbard, a Prince George's County Democrat, would...
FEATURES
By Julie Deardorff and Julie Deardorff,Chicago Tribune | July 26, 2007
In what may be a first among mainstream parenting books, an updated version of Baby 411 tells parents to stop using polycarbonate plastic baby bottles that contain the controversial chemical bisphenol-A, or BPA. Most baby bottles on the market are made from the hard, clear, shatterproof plastic, such as Avent, Dr. Brown's, Evenflo, Gerber and Playtex. But "until we get more answers about their safety, we do not recommend using polycarbonate bottles," wrote co-authors Denise Fields and pediatrician Ari Brown.
FEATURES
By Abigail Green | May 28, 2013
Watch that necklace, Mommy! Jewelry's up for grabs - - and gums - when you've got a baby in your arms. But with Teething Bling your baby can chomp away. They're pendants and bangles made from the same FDA-approved BPA- and lead-free material as most teething toys. The Maryland-based, mom-launched company even has a celebrity following - Tori Spelling's a fan. They're available at Little Sunshine Trading Co. in Ellicott City and at smartmomjewelry.com .
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Will consumers pay $20 for a reusable glass drinking bottle? Walt Himelstein thinks so. The Owings Mills environmental chemist and entrepreneur invented the Pure reusable glass drinking bottle, which features a shock-absorbing plastic sleeve that holds the glass together if it breaks. Himelstein, 59, hopes to tap a surging interest among environmentally conscious consumers who want their own reusable bottles, rather than buying beverages in single-use glass, metal or plastic containers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | April 9, 2012
What did you do last week when "The Amazing Race" wasn't on? Did you think of Big Brother Rachel's green sequins? Or of Army Dave's biceps? Or the cute way that Kentucky Mark pukes when he's in the back seat of a car? Oh, it's so nice to be back.   So the teams leave the Middle East and head to Africa. Yeah, like it happened that smoothly. Let's get this on the table right now: drama is afoot. Drama is underfoot, even.   Drama Part One: I thought kindergarten teachers would be bouncier A few days or weeks ago, when the teams were having a hoe-down around a ring of fire, the Border Patrol Agents and the Feds got to talking.
NEWS
May 10, 2011
A May 2, 2011 letter to the editor mischaracterizes a bill awaiting Gov. Martin O'Malley's signature on the chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA). The bill does not, as stated, ban infant formula infant formula and baby food packaging that contains more than 0.5 parts per billion (ppb) of BPA. Instead, the bill calls for the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to deliver a report to the General Assembly next year on federal research and regulatory activities related to BPA, specifically addressing the availability and safety of substitutes for BPA used in containers for infant formula.
NEWS
By Angela Logomasini | May 2, 2011
Dumb ideas are often infectious — especially in the world of politics. Lawmakers in several states, for example, are considering legislation similar to a foolhardy bill that the Maryland legislature passed last month that could itself actually increase infectious agents in our food supply. Awaiting Gov. Martin O'Malley's signature, the Maryland law bans infant formula and baby food packaging that contains more than 0.5 parts per billion (ppb) of the chemical Bisphenol A (BPA). Other states — California, Oregon and Missouri — are looking at imposing similar legislation, and members of Congress have even introduced bills that would ban BPA in all food packaging.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Homeowners in danger of foreclosure now have a right to mediation, schools and police can communicate more freely about gang activity, and civil court filing fees increase — all part of the package of more than 150 new state laws that take effect today. Marylanders are unlikely to be affected by most of the changes, which include local liquor board tweaks and a slew of legislative study panels and reports. The new legislation likely to have the broadest impact, the ban on handling cell phones will driving, doesn't take effect until Oct. 1. That's the date when the majority of the laws passed by the General Assembly this year take effect.
FEATURES
By Abigail Green | May 28, 2013
Watch that necklace, Mommy! Jewelry's up for grabs - - and gums - when you've got a baby in your arms. But with Teething Bling your baby can chomp away. They're pendants and bangles made from the same FDA-approved BPA- and lead-free material as most teething toys. The Maryland-based, mom-launched company even has a celebrity following - Tori Spelling's a fan. They're available at Little Sunshine Trading Co. in Ellicott City and at smartmomjewelry.com .
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 26, 2010
A bill to ban the chemical bisphenol-A from baby bottles and infants' cups passed its final hurdle in the General Assembly on Thursday. The Senate passed the BPA bill 46-0, after the House passed an identical bill last week. Gov. Martin O'Malley hasn't reviewed the legislation, but a spokesman said he doesn't believe the governor would have objections. If the bill is signed, Maryland would become the fourth state to ban the chemical linked to developmental problems in young children, reproductive troubles in women and other diseases.
NEWS
February 26, 2010
Kudos to the Maryland legislature for recognizing the health risks associated with exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) and taking action to prevent children from being exposed to this chemical ("Senate OKs BPA ban in bottles and cups for young children," Feb. 25). Unfortunately, BPA exposure does not only affect our children but can also have negative health impacts on both women and men across their lifespan. As a nurse-midwife, I am especially concerned about the possible impacts of fetal exposure to this chemical that is used in so many products.
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