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NEWS
June 15, 2010
Why can't people understand that if they boycott BP, the company will have to declare bankruptcy at some future date, and that will halt payment for the cleanup, etc. Plus, they are punishing fellow Marylanders who operate gasoline businesses. It never stops. Finton Cordell
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
No one will argue that the Orioles' offense could use a bit of a boost. Whether two men who joined them Thursday in batting practice could provide it is a different conversation entirely. Former Orioles Harold Reynolds and Brady Anderson were in full uniform yesterday before the Orioles' 3-1 loss to Houston, with Reynolds taking his hacks in the batting cage and trying to regain his late-80s All-Star form. Reynolds, now an MLB Network analyst, will broadcast today's Civil Rights Game in Houston.
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NEWS
June 30, 2010
BP is a blatant repeat offender — a serial criminal. In 2005, BP's criminal conduct resulted in an explosion at its Texas City Oil Refinery that killed 15 people; this was followed by the Prudhoe Bay, Alaska pipeline oil spill in 2006. In both cases multi-million dollar criminal fines were imposed. BP also paid hundreds of millions of dollars in civil and administrative fines for Occupational Health and Safety Administration and environmental violations. And now, BP is responsible for yet even more deaths and an environmental disaster of devastating proportions.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
Gone are the days when weekly newspaper stat lines and monthly issues of Baseball America were the only sources of information on a team's minor league players. A rising interest in fantasy baseball, the home team's future, and sadly, a cottage industry of autograph creepers have all led to a boom in minor league scouting reports and player stories online. Everyone wants to know who tomorrow's stars are, and the earlier you're in on someone, the more you can crow when he turns out to be a stud.
NEWS
By John McCarron | June 9, 2010
Take it easy on BP. Sure, it's tempting to join the public posse that wants the government to bring criminal charges against oil company executives. Or the environmentalists who'd like to end all offshore drilling. Or the Republicans (formerly the party of "Drill, baby, drill") who insist the Obama administration should be doing more. They all need to take a deep breath and count to three. Why three? Three is the average number of gallons of gas and oil products that we Americans — all 310 million of us — consume every day. We need our oil, lots of oil, and no foreseeable combination of windmills or solar panels or fiberglass insulation is going to change that.
NEWS
June 15, 2010
Unfortunately the boycott of BP gas stations affects local station owners, but consumers really don't have any other way to vent their frustration with the oil company. ("Sales fall at area BP pumps in wake of spill," June 14). As a consumer I know that the only way we can truly avoid such disasters is by cutting down on our consumption of oil and hope that automobile manufacturers will produce cars that will use renewable sources of energy that won't harm the environment as much as oil. That won't necessarily solve our problems as we have become a world dependent on the use of petroleum and other sources of fuel that pollute our earth.
NEWS
July 28, 2010
Ever since BP's then-CEO Tony Haywood was caught on TV complaining about how he wanted his life back after the company's massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico — and then got himself photographed on a yacht while frantic cleanup efforts were under way — it's been evident he wouldn't be in his job much longer. On Monday, BP made it official by naming as his replacement Robert Dudley, the company's American-born operations manager, who stepped in as the oil giant's public face after the gaffe-prone Mr. Haywood was yanked from in front of the cameras.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2010
Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin said after touring the oil-smeared Louisiana coast Friday that federal officials appear to be making progress in curtailing the huge leak from the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico. But the Maryland Democrat urged Obama administration officials to challenge BP more, and he vowed to push legislation in the Senate to hold the energy company liable for all damages caused to coastal communities as well as the cleanup costs "It is just beyond description," Cardin said by telephone of the devastation he and other senators saw in a helicopter flyover as well as a boat tour of the waters near Queen Bess Island and Grand Isle.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2005
Clutching a clear plastic tub containing two enormous white rats, Young Hee Ko scampers through a labyrinth of laboratory hallways at the Johns Hopkins Institute for Basic Biomedical Sciences. Down stairwells, through automatic doors and across glassed-in bridges spanning busy East Baltimore streets, she is a blur of black clogs, blue jeans and obligatory white lab coat. Ko and her pink-eyed rats, named "One Dottie" and "July Mom" (JM), are late for a date in Dr. Martin G. Pomper's radiology lab, a pit stop in their marathon race to find a cure for cancer.
NEWS
June 30, 2010
In an interview on National Public Radio this week, Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour said that the Gulf oil spill was an example of the free market working properly. He reasoned that BP had the most to lose from the spill, namely $100 million per day in costs. And thus, BP had the greatest incentive to clean-up the oil spill. His conclusion is odd: The market functions properly when an oil company has repeated safety violations, ultimately causing an oil rig explosion that causes a loss in lives and perhaps the greatest environmental catastrophe in history.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has filed a lawsuit against oil company BP over investment losses following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon explosion, alleging that the state's pension fund lost millions after the company misled the public about its safety protocols. BP made "false and misleading statements regarding its commitment to safety reforms and oil spill prevention and response capabilities," Gansler said. He said those misstatements gave investors like the Maryland pension fund unwarranted confidence in the company, which should "be held accountable for the losses that have occurred.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. -- Nobody gets too excited about spring training batting practice - especially when the wind is blowing straight out from home to center field - but it was hard not to be impressed with the way Nolan Reimold was driving the ball before Wednesday night's game. Reimold hit one over the 30-foot batters eye in center field (400 feet away) and hit a number of others balls well out of the ballpark. This would not be unusual if Reimold weren't still rehabbing from neck surgery and still trying to regain full strength in his left shoulder and forearm.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | November 22, 2012
The Justice Department has entered into the largest criminal settlement in U.S. history with the giant oil company BP, in connection with the 2010 disaster in the Gulf of Mexico that killed 11 people and caused the worst oil spill in American history. BP pleaded guilty to 14 criminal counts, including manslaughter, and agreed to pay $4 billion over the next five years. This is nonsensical. BP isn't a criminal. Corporations aren't people. They can't know right from wrong. They're incapable of criminal intent.
EXPLORE
By Nikki Gamer | March 28, 2012
World-class track athlete Tatyana McFadden is not a flashy person. Soft-spoken with a thin face, dark brown eyes and a deceptively muscular frame, she is not the type to speak of her accomplishments without some prompting. But when she does talk about her accolades, she lets people know that success hasn't come easy. “I've worked hard for it,” says the Clarksville resident, who is paraplegic. Just shy of her 23rd birthday, McFadden has an impressive résumé. A graduate of Atholton High School, she holds U.S. records in the 100-meter, 200-meter, 400-meter, 800-meter and 1,500-meter races.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
A day after leaving Target Field for a local hospital because of to shortness of breath, center fielder Adam Jones was back in the Orioles' starting lineup Wednesday and making jokes about his potential health scare. "I wanted my mom," joked Jones, who left Tuesday's game in the second inning. "I called my mom and said, 'Mommy, come fly to Minnesota and come take care of me.' " Jones said he had no trouble when he batted in the first Tuesday, but when he went out to the field in the bottom of the inning he couldn't catch his breath.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2011
BP Solar warned state regulators Monday that it will close what remains of its Frederick operation and lay off 58 employees, starting this fall. The company's decision to shut the solar-power facility, cutting research and development jobs as well as sales and marketing positions, came after it relocated the manufacturing operation there overseas. BP announced in March 2010 that the site would lose 320 manufacturing jobs as a result. The remainder of the facility will close by March of next year, with layoffs beginning in October, said a BP Solar spokesman, Pete Resler.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2010
Fresh from visits to the oil-smeared Louisiana coast, Maryland's two Democratic senators and one of its House members called today for new measures to ensure that BP pays for the damage caused by the largest petroleum spill in U.S. history. Sens. Barbara A. Mikulski and Benjamin L. Cardin backed the Obama administration's move to get BP to set up an escrow account for paying damage claims, saying the company ought to stock the fund with $20 billion. Mikulski said the company should set aside funds promptly, because she feared that as damages mount in the Gulf of Mexico, "the lawyers will take charge" and put BP in bankruptcy.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 11, 2010
Everyone who steps into the great outdoors and uses it in some way — hunters and hikers, campers and canoeists, bass anglers and those of us who fish for trout — are supposed to know the rules: Leave a place as you found it, take your trash with you, get involved in stewardship in some way so your children and grandchildren can experience the same pleasures of the natural world some day. There are a few other rules, borrowed from...
NEWS
By Rena Steinzor | April 20, 2011
A year ago today, the nation gasped in collective horror at the catastrophic explosion of the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig, the loss of 11 workers' lives, and the beginning of what would become a months-long gush of some 200 million gallons of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Time was when such events spurred a cleansing tide of soul-searching and reform. Not this time. Subsequent reforms have been slight, most gulf drilling continued all along, and new permits are now being issued for more deepwater sites — even in the face of reports that the supposedly "failsafe" blowout preventers that are the industry's last line of defense against spills are prone to failure.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
Baltimore County police say they quickly found the connection between an assault at a Timonium restaurant and a crash at a gas station in Hunt Valley early Thursday morning. Officers responded to an emergency call at An Poitin Stil on York Road about 2 a.m., only to find that the assailant had fled. Police said the restaurant staff identified the man as an intoxicated patron who had been asked to leave. When two workers escorted the man from the restaurant, he assaulted them, police said.
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