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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | December 7, 1990
THREE OF THE most famous boys choirs in the world -- The Boys Choirs of Vienna, Miami and Harlem -- will sing in Baltimore Dec. 11, Dec. 16 and Jan. 5.The boys from Vienna, in a 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 11, program at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, will sing seven pieces from Britten's "A Ceremony of Carols," Faure's "Ave Verum" and "Jesu Redemptor Omnium" and the "Hallelujah Chorus" from Handel's "Messiah."Other works by the choir, formed in 1498, are an adaptation of Carl Michael Ziehrer's comic opera "Old Vienna" and holiday tunes such as "Angels We Have Heard," "Once in Royal David's City" and "Deck the Halls."
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NEWS
October 2, 2005
`Fright Film' festival to show four movies The Carroll County Arts Council has chosen a line-up of horror-themed films for its October "Fright Film" festival, to be held at 7 p.m. every Friday this month at the Carroll Arts Center, 91 W. Main St., Westminster. Scheduled films are: Oct. 7: Young Frankenstein. A neurosurgeon, played by Gene Wilder, inherits the castle of his grandfather, Dr. Victor von Frankenstein. He discovers the mad doctor's book that describes "reanimation" and he, too, tries his hand at brain transplants, with comical results.
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NEWS
July 13, 1998
St. Michael's Roman Catholic Church in Poplar Springs will celebrate Bastille Day with a concert by the LePetit Chanteur de la Vierge Noire Boys Choir from Paris.The concert will be held at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the sanctuary at 1125 St. Michael's Road, south of Mount Airy.The 35-year-old choir is under the direction of Pierre Balbous. The 40-member choir of boys and men from ages 8 through 24 performs classics by Schubert, Mozart, Vivaldi and Bach, French folk music and American spirituals.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2005
WASHINGTON - This is what it felt like on the floor of the 9:30 Club in the moments before the Backstreet Boys made their triumphant return: A deep rumbling noise shook the walls. Blue lights swept the crowd. Cymbals clashed. The smoke machines went into overdrive. And then it happened: Nick, Kevin, Howie, Brian and A.J. raced onstage in white jackets, white hats and white sneakers. A thousand voices shrieked and a thousand digital cameras were lifted into the air. The Backstreet Boys were back.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | January 8, 1991
LITTLE OF beauty has America given the world," the scholar W. E. B. DuBois wrote in 1903, "save the rude grandeur God himself stamped on her bosom; the human spirit in this new world has expressed itself in vigor and ingenuity rather than in beauty. And so by fateful chance the Negro folk-song -- the rhythmic cry of the slave -- stands today not simply as the sole AmeriGlennMcNattcan music, but as the most beautiful expression of human experience born this side the seas."I was reminded of DuBois' words, which are contained in the final chapter of his little book, "The Souls of Black Folk," last week when I attended a concert by the Boys Choir of Harlem at Baltimore's Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1994
For 25 years, Walter S. Turnbull has been scouring New York for hidden talent, smoothing the rough edges of life in tough neighborhoods by teaching music -- and creating one of America's premier youth choral groups, the Boys Choir of Harlem.The job hasn't changed much, he says, despite the nation's current worries about guns and violence among urban youth."I think it has been around for a long time, it's just politically correct for everybody to recognize it now," Dr. Turnbull*says bluntly during a telephone interview in advance of a two-concert appearance Sunday at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | January 3, 1991
TWO CONCERTS of music showing the black experience are planned at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall this month. The first is the Boys Choir of Harlem singing a mixed program including the works of Adolphus Hailstork and Duke Ellington and the second honors Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with the Baltimore premiere of Hannibal Peterson's "African Portraits."Singing at 2 p.m. Saturday are 35 members of the Boys Choir of Harlem, one of the busiest choral groups in the country. Members, who are 10 to 18, are part of a larger choir of 150. They have their own school where they must keep a B average, sing everything form rock to baroque, spend most weekends on the road and will be subjects of a future full-length movie.
FEATURES
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1999
The phone tip seemed too weird to be true: The Vienna Boys Choir, the caller said, was just outside town -- bowling.As a reporter in Allentown, Pa., when the call came in October 1989, I was naturally skeptical. After all, what would the troupe of angelic voices created 500 years ago by the decree of Emperor Maximilian I be doing throwing round globs of plastic at wooden pins outside Allentown?But, just to be sure, I dashed to the bowling alley and found 22 members of the Vienna Boys Choir, ages 9 to 13, dressed alike in green sweatshirts and bowling.
NEWS
December 8, 1991
Glenn McNatt, an editorial writer for The Evening Sun, has been named winner of the 1991 A. D. Emmart Award for writing in the humanities for an article inspired by a Boys Choir of Harlem concert in January at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.The editorial page article, "Harlem Boys Choir Carries On 'Singular Spiritual Legacy'," was published in The Evening Sun Jan. 8.Honorable mentions went to Carl Schoettler of The Evening Sun for "Miles Davis Summed Up a Time, and He Summed Up a Music," an op-ed page obituary tribute to the jazz trumpeter; J. Wynn Rousuck, drama reviewer for The Sun, for her Sunday feature article, "Dramatist's Butterfly Existence," about the playwright David Henry Hwang; and to Alan Feiler of the Jewish Times for "Baltimore's Black Jewish Congregation," which appeared in that publication.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | December 8, 1991
TCVienna Boys Choir to sing at MeyerhoffFor music lovers all over the world the Christmas season isn't complete without a concert by the Vienna Boys Choir. This most famous of angelically voiced choirs will make two appearances at Meyerhoff Hall at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 10 and 11. They sing such favorites as "Ave Maria," "Stille Nacht" ("Silent Night") and "Away a Manger," and they also perform semi-staged, short operettas. Tickets are priced at $16 to $30. For further information, call the Meyerhoff box office -- (410)
NEWS
August 13, 2003
Charles M. Powell Jr., a retired Washington Area Metropolitan Transit Authority supervisor, died of a heart attack Aug. 6 at his Mitchellville home. He was 70. Mr. Powell was born in Lutherville and raised on Druid Hill Avenue. As a youngster, he began singing with the Baltimore Boys Choir and his dream was to be a member of the boys choir at Father Flanagan's Boys Town in Nebraska. Though not an orphan, Mr. Powell, a tenor, was allowed to enroll at Boys Town, from which he graduated in 1951.
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 2002
IN PREPARATION for a possible New York production and national tour, the Chesapeake Arts will present the new musical Rumpelstiltskin's Daughter through Nov. 24. The play is based on Diane Stanley's award-winning children's book and puts a new twist on the fairy tale. Instead of the miller's daughter marrying the king, in Stanley's version the miller's daughter marries Rumplestiltskin and raises a family. The action begins when their daughter Hope discovers that she has inherited her father's magical powers.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2000
Robbie Menrad is 12, lives in Pasadena and speaks no Dutch. Tom van der Reep is 10, from the Netherlands and speaks no English. At first blush, the two boys have little to build a friendship on, since they barely can communicate with each other. But from the time that Tom arrived in Maryland on Saturday to stay with Robbie for a weeklong Baltimore-Rotterdam Sister Cities boys choir exchange program, they've closely bonded over two things they hold in common - playing Nintendo and trading Pokemon cards.
FEATURES
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1999
The phone tip seemed too weird to be true: The Vienna Boys Choir, the caller said, was just outside town -- bowling.As a reporter in Allentown, Pa., when the call came in October 1989, I was naturally skeptical. After all, what would the troupe of angelic voices created 500 years ago by the decree of Emperor Maximilian I be doing throwing round globs of plastic at wooden pins outside Allentown?But, just to be sure, I dashed to the bowling alley and found 22 members of the Vienna Boys Choir, ages 9 to 13, dressed alike in green sweatshirts and bowling.
NEWS
July 13, 1998
St. Michael's Roman Catholic Church in Poplar Springs will celebrate Bastille Day with a concert by the LePetit Chanteur de la Vierge Noire Boys Choir from Paris.The concert will be held at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the sanctuary at 1125 St. Michael's Road, south of Mount Airy.The 35-year-old choir is under the direction of Pierre Balbous. The 40-member choir of boys and men from ages 8 through 24 performs classics by Schubert, Mozart, Vivaldi and Bach, French folk music and American spirituals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | May 9, 1996
'Tommy' tunesThe story of a boy struck deaf, dumb and blind after witnessing a murder and his extraordinary journey to recovery will be told in a succession of songs and instrumentals in the rock opera "The Who's Tommy," opening Tuesday and running through May 19 at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre. The Who first gave voice to Tommy in 1969 with its landmark concept album of the rock opera. Show times are 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, 2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays and 7: 30 p.m. Sundays.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | December 19, 1993
African-American life in photo show at BMAIt might be a boy getting a haircut. Or a guy with pigeons on a rooftop. Or a grandmotherly type trying out a Hula-Hoop. Ordinary-enough fragments of everyday life, but that's the point behind "Songs of My People." Originating at Washington's Corcoran Gallery and now stopping at the Baltimore Museum of Art on a nationwide tour, the show is the result of a project in which 53 photojournalists traveled the country in 1990 to record African-American life.
NEWS
August 13, 2003
Charles M. Powell Jr., a retired Washington Area Metropolitan Transit Authority supervisor, died of a heart attack Aug. 6 at his Mitchellville home. He was 70. Mr. Powell was born in Lutherville and raised on Druid Hill Avenue. As a youngster, he began singing with the Baltimore Boys Choir and his dream was to be a member of the boys choir at Father Flanagan's Boys Town in Nebraska. Though not an orphan, Mr. Powell, a tenor, was allowed to enroll at Boys Town, from which he graduated in 1951.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1994
For 25 years, Walter S. Turnbull has been scouring New York for hidden talent, smoothing the rough edges of life in tough neighborhoods by teaching music -- and creating one of America's premier youth choral groups, the Boys Choir of Harlem.The job hasn't changed much, he says, despite the nation's current worries about guns and violence among urban youth."I think it has been around for a long time, it's just politically correct for everybody to recognize it now," Dr. Turnbull*says bluntly during a telephone interview in advance of a two-concert appearance Sunday at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | December 19, 1993
African-American life in photo show at BMAIt might be a boy getting a haircut. Or a guy with pigeons on a rooftop. Or a grandmotherly type trying out a Hula-Hoop. Ordinary-enough fragments of everyday life, but that's the point behind "Songs of My People." Originating at Washington's Corcoran Gallery and now stopping at the Baltimore Museum of Art on a nationwide tour, the show is the result of a project in which 53 photojournalists traveled the country in 1990 to record African-American life.
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