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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
- Stores were shuttered and streets were mostly empty Friday morning as a manhunt was underway for a suspect in the marathon bombing that killed three and injured more than 180 others. Police had killed one suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing in a shootout early Friday. Officials said the dead suspect was Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, and identified the hunted man as his brother, Dzhokar A. Tsarnaev, 19. Law enforcement urged all in Boston to stay home. Natalie Lambdin, a 27-year-old graduate student at Boston College, said the usually bustling area near Copley Square felt "eerie.
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SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
Qualifying for the Boston Marathon was not on Michelle Hollingsworth's radar when she broke into a jog at the start of the Marine Corps Marathon in 2012, but it sure was 3 hours and 36 minutes later. The 47-year-old hadn't expected to cross the finish line in Rosslyn, Va., so quickly, fast enough to qualify for the prestigious 26.2-mile race that begins in Hopkinton and ends on Boylston Street in Boston. The disappointment came later, when she found that registration had closed for the 2013 Boston Marathon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
Even as Edgar Allan Poe's continuing presence in Baltimore remains uncertain, another East Coast city —the one in which the celebrated author was born — is preparing to honor him with a bronze statue. Poe partisans in Boston have chosen New York sculptor Stefanie Rocknak for the $125,000 project. Her design shows an adult Poe, who left Boston as a young child, as though he had just stepped off a train. To be placed in the city's Edgar Allan Poe Square, at the intersection of Boylston Street and Charles Street South, the statue will be situated so that Poe is heading back to his birthplace.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 20, 2013
In the two months after 9/11, I called Baltimore County police to check out a black-and-tan backpack left by an office door in Towson, reported an abandoned carry-on bag at BWI to Maryland State Police and refused to watch a bulky valise for a stranger who wanted to leave it with me while he went to the restroom at the airport. Anyone who lived through 9/11 remembers those days of hyper-vigilance. And if that uncomfortable state of mind ever left us as the years went by, it certainly returned last week.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2013
Before reading this, just know that there will be no mention of the Orioles' designated hitter slump in this blog post, no talk of any blown bubbles by Adam Jones or when Dylan Bundy and Kevin Gausman are coming to the big league club. So excuse me for digressing. I was just walking down Boylston Street this past Wednesday, less than a block away from the exact spot where a city sidewalk turned into the site of tragedy during Monday's Boston Marathon, one of this country's premier sporting events.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
Qualifying for the Boston Marathon was not on Michelle Hollingsworth's radar when she broke into a jog at the start of the Marine Corps Marathon in 2012, but it sure was 3 hours and 36 minutes later. The 47-year-old hadn't expected to cross the finish line in Rosslyn, Va., so quickly, fast enough to qualify for the prestigious 26.2-mile race that begins in Hopkinton and ends on Boylston Street in Boston. The disappointment came later, when she found that registration had closed for the 2013 Boston Marathon.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 20, 2013
In the two months after 9/11, I called Baltimore County police to check out a black-and-tan backpack left by an office door in Towson, reported an abandoned carry-on bag at BWI to Maryland State Police and refused to watch a bulky valise for a stranger who wanted to leave it with me while he went to the restroom at the airport. Anyone who lived through 9/11 remembers those days of hyper-vigilance. And if that uncomfortable state of mind ever left us as the years went by, it certainly returned last week.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2013
Sixty-six runners dashed, jogged and walked through the streets of Annapolis on Saturday to honor the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing and raised money for one of the hospitals that treated their wounds. "When I saw what happened in Boston, I knew we had to do something, and we had to run," said Caitlin Chapman, who organized the race and got quick permission from an Annapolis official to stage the start and finish at City Dock. "It could have been any of us running in that race in Boston," Chapman said, "and it could have been our family members who were standing there watching us finish.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, Yvonne Wenger and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2013
- At 2:42 p.m. on Monday - just minutes before the first bomb exploded along the marathon course - Carol Downing's son-in-law and daughters were positioned perfectly to watch her run past the blue-and-yellow finish line painted across Boylston Street. Michael Gross took six, maybe seven or eight, steps away from his wife, Nicole, and her sister, Erika Brannock, until he found the spot where he planned to snap a picture of the moment they had waited for all day. The three had been tracking Downing's progress on their smartphones as her feet touched the timing mats along the route.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 23, 2012
Boston may be slipping ahead in the Edgar Allan Poe arms race -- the city is preparing for a new bronze statue to honor the great author, even as Baltimore struggles to preserve his former home. The Baltimore Sun's Chris Kaltenbach reports that sculptor Stefanie Rocknak was selected for the $125,000 project in Boston, to be located at the intersection of Boylston Street and Charles Street South. Her design shows an adult Poe as though he had just stepped off a train. I think the design is really cool -- especially because it gives a plug to the Baltimore Ravens , right in the backyard of the New England Patriots.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2013
Sixty-six runners dashed, jogged and walked through the streets of Annapolis on Saturday to honor the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing and raised money for one of the hospitals that treated their wounds. "When I saw what happened in Boston, I knew we had to do something, and we had to run," said Caitlin Chapman, who organized the race and got quick permission from an Annapolis official to stage the start and finish at City Dock. "It could have been any of us running in that race in Boston," Chapman said, "and it could have been our family members who were standing there watching us finish.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, Yvonne Wenger and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2013
- At 2:42 p.m. on Monday - just minutes before the first bomb exploded along the marathon course - Carol Downing's son-in-law and daughters were positioned perfectly to watch her run past the blue-and-yellow finish line painted across Boylston Street. Michael Gross took six, maybe seven or eight, steps away from his wife, Nicole, and her sister, Erika Brannock, until he found the spot where he planned to snap a picture of the moment they had waited for all day. The three had been tracking Downing's progress on their smartphones as her feet touched the timing mats along the route.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
- Stores were shuttered and streets were mostly empty Friday morning as a manhunt was underway for a suspect in the marathon bombing that killed three and injured more than 180 others. Police had killed one suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing in a shootout early Friday. Officials said the dead suspect was Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, and identified the hunted man as his brother, Dzhokar A. Tsarnaev, 19. Law enforcement urged all in Boston to stay home. Natalie Lambdin, a 27-year-old graduate student at Boston College, said the usually bustling area near Copley Square felt "eerie.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2013
Before reading this, just know that there will be no mention of the Orioles' designated hitter slump in this blog post, no talk of any blown bubbles by Adam Jones or when Dylan Bundy and Kevin Gausman are coming to the big league club. So excuse me for digressing. I was just walking down Boylston Street this past Wednesday, less than a block away from the exact spot where a city sidewalk turned into the site of tragedy during Monday's Boston Marathon, one of this country's premier sporting events.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
Even as Edgar Allan Poe's continuing presence in Baltimore remains uncertain, another East Coast city —the one in which the celebrated author was born — is preparing to honor him with a bronze statue. Poe partisans in Boston have chosen New York sculptor Stefanie Rocknak for the $125,000 project. Her design shows an adult Poe, who left Boston as a young child, as though he had just stepped off a train. To be placed in the city's Edgar Allan Poe Square, at the intersection of Boylston Street and Charles Street South, the statue will be situated so that Poe is heading back to his birthplace.
SPORTS
By LORI RILEY and LORI RILEY,THE HARTFORD COURANT | April 18, 2006
BOSTON -- For the past 18 years, since Ibrahim Hussein's 1988 victory, Kenyans have dominated in the Boston Marathon. Yesterday, they continued that tradition. Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot became the 15th Kenyan to win the 110th version of the 26.2-mile race and the fourth Kenyan to win it twice. On a chilly Patriots Day afternoon, he broke countryman Cosmas Ndeti's 12-year-old course record by a second, finishing in 2 hours, 7 minutes, 14 seconds. Six more Kenyans finished in the top 20. That was no surprise.
SPORTS
By Frank Dell'Apa and Frank Dell'Apa,Boston Globe | April 9, 1993
BOSTON -- Bill Rodgers reckons that his daily jogs of the past three decades have been the equivalent of "running around the world three or four times." Give or take 25,000 miles or so.With that, Rodgers announced yesterday that he has retired from marathoning, though he will compete in shorter distance races."I feel the 58 hard marathons I have done," Rodgers said. "I'm tired from that. There are only a certain number of marathons that anyone can do. I've done 28 sub-2:15 marathons, and that takes a lot out of you."
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