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By Ray Jenkins and By Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | December 31, 2000
"An Hour Before Daylight: Memories of my Rural Boyhood," by Jimmy Carter. Simon & Shuster. 356 pages. $26. Twenty-four years ago, Jimmy Carter arose from the obscurity of a one-term governor of Georgia to become the 39th president of the United States, and the nation seemed a bit taken aback at what it had done. After all, for more than a century the South had loomed in the collective imagination as an exotic place, defined chiefly by its novels -- from the syrupy sentimentality of Margaret Mitchell, to the ribald satire of Erskine Caldwell, to the brooding mysticism of William Faulkner.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
The Stadlers' story is a tale of two houses on the same riverfront street in Sparrows Point and a dream that began when Tim Stadler was just a young boy. "My parents had friends that we would visit about once a week that lived on River Drive Road," he recalled. "There was a house on the street that had a small airplane in the front yard. As a kid, I always had my parents drive me past the 'airplane house' on our way home. " Then, in 2001, when he was 21 and looking for a waterfront house, Tim Stadler came across one in a home magazine.
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NEWS
December 23, 1997
The Rev. Ernest Bromley,85, a war resister and one of the original Freedom Riders who spoke against racial segregation in the South, died of cancer Dec. 17 in Cincinnati.Leo August,83, who developed a boyhood stamp collection and a fascination with airplanes into a prominent philatelic publishing house, died Dec. 4 in Livingston, N.J.Pub Date: 12/24/97
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Michael Vincent Manieri, a Baltimore City firefighter and medic, died of heart disease Wednesday at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 40 and lived in Towson. Born in Baltimore and raised on Parklawn Avenue, he attended Shrine of the Little Flower School and Archbishop Curley High School. He later took emergency medical training courses at the Community College of Baltimore County at Essex. "It was his dream to become a firefighter from the time he was 9 years old," said his father, Frank Manieri of Towson.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | October 3, 1990
MANY PEOPLE have been angered by the story of the New England Patriots football players displaying themselves naked to female sports reporter in the locker room.Many others are angry at the female sports reporter.They ask, why does she want to be in a locker room anyhow? Doesn't she know there's likely to be nudity in a locker room?Locker rooms are places where athletes shower and change clothes. These activities require undress. Doesn't she know that?Oh come off it, says the other side. Unless these players grew up rich, they probably spent their boyhoods sharing one-bathroom households with mothers and sisters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 24, 1993
'The Program'Starring Craig Sheffer, James Caan and Omar EppsDirected by David S. WardReleased by TouchstoneRated R***"Amazing how potent cheap music can be," one of Noel Coward's characters once remarked. I think of that phrase every time I like something I know I'm not supposed to, for it's equally amazing how potent cheap melodrama can be. The case in point is "T Ward is the John Woo of the sports movie. This moribund genre has been sputtering along for dreary year after year, until he pretty much reinvigorated it with "Major League.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1996
Steve Carr has been privileged to watch the Chesapeake more than most, living since birth in the big, white house on the high bluff across from the Naval Academy.Here, near the mouth of the Severn, he's seen the river gain and the front yard lose. How much?Between the cliff's edge and the rail fence in his front yard, "it's gone from nine lawn-mower widths to one," he says.That would have been since his boyhood -- slow erosion by bay standards, but enough for newer homeowners along the bluff to armor their properties with rock and bulkheading that have eliminated the beaches Carr walked "like ritual" as a kid.More ominous was the change he saw in the submerged grass beds that lined the Severn here "so thick our neighbor's dalmatian got hung up and drowned when I was 10."
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | April 19, 1993
Forty years ago, he sat next to me in the 5th grade. The two of us were the only new boys in the class. We went on to become close friends through high school and college. We were ushers in each other's weddings.After that, we kept up. But he lived in the city, and I didn't. Over the years, our friendship slowly slid into sporadic lunches and an occasional ball game. Then last week, we spent five days skiing out west together.He's a stronger and more experienced skier. But I managed to keep up with him most of the time.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | August 3, 1992
Famous TV siblings Chip and Ernie Douglas of "My Three Sons" are the real-life sons of a Baltimore Block stripper who performed during the Great Depression under the name Marilyn Primrose.This and other obscure and marvelous facts of Baltimore burlesque fill pages in the personal history of 81-year-old Bernard Livingston, lawyer, author, United Press International photographer, filmmaker, and favorite uncle of Stanley "Chip" Livingston and Barry "Ernie" Livingston."You got it," said Mr. Livingston, in Baltimore this past weekend to screen one of his documentaries in a film festival at the Orpheum Cinema on Thames Street.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | April 14, 1993
ARLINGTON, Texas -- Right-hander Ben McDonald hopes to realize a lifelong dream tonight when he is scheduled to take the mound against boyhood idol Nolan Ryan in the finale of the three-game series against the Texas Rangers at Arlington Stadium."
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN and PETER HERMANN,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | April 19, 2009
Three little boys are shooting basketball at the Alexander Odum Playground in West Baltimore's Rosemont community when Sean Mosley strolls by the chain-link fence. "You playing hoops today?" one boy shouts out. "I'm taking the day off," Mosley answers. He's standing between the kids and a cemetery made from graffiti. "Free GSC. We miss u Shorty," says one tribute to the fallen of the West Baltimore drug wars. Sean pauses, recalling the streets of his youth. "I probably know some of them," he says.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 21, 2008
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, a Holocaust fable, is meant to be a heartbreaker about the moral lessons to be gleaned from the friendship of two 8-year-olds, a Jewish concentration-camp inmate named Shmuel (Jack Scanlon) and the Nazi commandant's son, Bruno (Asa Butterfield). It plays like a cautionary tale about the perils of naivete. Although John Boyne's book has become a middle-school favorite (and the plot does work better in print), I found the movie impossibly basic and sanitized as a "never again" parable of the Final Solution - and simply wrongheaded as a story about children.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | July 3, 2008
After a century of speculation, seven years of digging in the Virginia dirt, and two false starts, archaeologists believe they have finally found traces of George Washington's boyhood home, called Ferry Farm, on the Rappahannock River near Fredericksburg. Thousands of mid-18th-century artifacts, including a broken tea set, along with the home's complex design, are providing historians with hard evidence that is enabling them to reconstruct, for the first time, the physical and economic circumstances of the first president's formative years.
NEWS
By Paul Watson and Paul Watson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 16, 2007
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- As a boy in Indonesia, Barack Obama crisscrossed the religious divide. At the local primary school, he prayed in thanks to a Catholic saint. In the neighborhood mosque, he bowed to Allah. Having a personal background in Christianity and Islam might seem useful for an aspiring U.S. president in an age when Islamic nations and radical groups are key national security and foreign policy issues. But a connection with Islam is untrod territory for presidential politics.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,Sun Reporter | March 4, 2007
I was surprised that the woods were so small. As a boy, they'd appeared vast. It had seemed nearly impossible to find someone there in a game of hide and seek. The large, gray rock formation in the middle made an exquisite fort. All that brush and all those trees seemed remote. Grown-ups rarely approached them (part of their appeal) and, especially if bigger kids wandered by, they were probably a little dangerous (also part of their appeal). There was a distinct quiet to the place, far -- or at least it seemed far -- from the noise of traffic on the nearby streets or the happy screams of children in the playground below.
TRAVEL
By Jerry V. Haines and Jerry V. Haines,Special to the Sun | February 20, 2005
There's a monument at the corner of Washington Avenue and Pitt Street in Fredericksburg, Va., engraved to proclaim that the woman buried below it is "Mary, the Mother of Washington." It sounds almost biblical, consistent with the high regard many people had for George Washington and his family. (Lots of people disliked him, too; they just didn't make statements in marble about it.) But to me what's attractive about Fredericksburg is the opportunity it gives us to sweep away the legendary stuff -- good or bad -- and see the day-to-day realities of Washington's life and the lives of people of his time.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Staff Writer | August 28, 1992
HOT SPRINGS -- Earlier this month, when the Arkansas town of Hope erected a billboard along Interstate 30 declaring itself Bill Clinton's "birthplace," this city 80 miles northeast answered with a 40-foot banner across Central Avenue proclaiming itself his "boyhood home."The sudden burst of pride in the Democratic presidential candidate has less to do with honoring a hometown boy than with cashing in on his newfound celebrity.Truth is, neither community did much public bragging about their governor -- who was born in Hope and moved at age 7 to Hot Springs -- until he received the nomination last month.
NEWS
By Any L. Miller and Any L. Miller,Staff Writer | December 10, 1992
A dream of fame and fortune hasn't drawn Bruce Witte int the auction business.Just the roar of the crowd."I'm certainly not doing this for the money," said the 40-year-old -- owner of the Golden Gavel in Taylorsville. "I just had a desire to do it."His new business has yet to garner a paycheck for the family members and few friends who help him run the monthly auctions.But that does not dampen a desire that started all the way back before high school."I've been to auctions ever since I was a kid," said Mr. Witte, as he recalled wandering through estate auctions and traveling far from home with his father.
FEATURES
By Terry Lawson and Terry Lawson,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 7, 2004
David S. Goyer grew up in an Ann Arbor, Mich., home where books were everywhere, and he was raised by his mother to believe that reading was "pure pleasure, not some chore or duty." So although other relatives may have expected Goyer to study law or medicine when he was accepted at the University of Michigan, his mother, whom he describes as a "frustrated artist," not only accepted but also encouraged her son to concentrate on writing. But did she ever imagine his talent would be put in the service of comic books?
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2004
Steve Bisciotti puffs on a cigar at his estate overlooking the Severn River, soaking in the memories that have grounded him on his rise to becoming the Ravens' new principal owner. The walls on "his side of the house" - his wife's half is the nonsmoking part - are lined with the faces of former Baltimore Colts such as Johnny Unitas and Raymond Berry. The snapshots were autographed at training camps in Westminster where he and his father made annual summer trips. Inside the garage of the white plantation-style mansion is his first car - a 1969 white convertible MGB that took three years of saving to buy. Its license plates bear his old nickname, "Shots."
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