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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 23, 1993
All boys' lives are different in details, but all are the same, too, in the larger outline. And the largest outline of all sooner or later belongs to that caricature of horror and terror, that buffoon and bully, that dark, unreachable tyrant, that stupid, uncool moron -- the father figure."
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By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,sumathi.reddy@baltsun.com | August 30, 2008
There was no casket, no bouquets of flowers, no pews filled with people. Instead, there was a small wooden toybox and pictures of a 15-month-old baby drinking his bottle and playing, and the dozen mourners who came to say good-bye to him. "I fought hard to save this little boy's life ... but nobody would help me," said Seeta Khadan-Newton, Javon Thompson's grandmother. "So I was fighting a fight by myself which ended with me losing my grandson and my daughter where she is now." Javon's mother, Ria Ramkissoon, 21, is among five people Baltimore homicide detectives have charged with first-degree murder in connection with the toddler's death.
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By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 13, 1994
What's surprising about Leonardo DiCaprio is that in person, he isn't all that different from Arnie, whom he plays in "What's Eating Gilbert Grape."That is surprising because Arnie is mentally retarded -- and Mr. DiCaprio most certainly is not.He's a smart, successful 19-year-old with an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor.Mr. DiCaprio is also restless and fidgety. His eyes roam, his fingers pester his face, his arms and upper body go all gangly. He seems to be somewhere else -- or to want to be.But on this evening several weeks before the Oscar nominations, he is trapped in an office on the Paramount lot.Inside the nearby Paramount theater are insiders -- friends of the producers, friends of friends of the producers, Paramount queen Sherry Lansing -- all attending a celebration screening of "Gilbert Grape."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Tucker and Ken Tucker,Special to the Sun | November 23, 2003
Old School, by Tobias Wolff. Knopf. 198 pages. $22. Tobias Wolff is the author of numerous collections of exemplary short stories as well as the celebrated memoir This Boy's Life. Wolff is a master of reverie, avoiding sentimentality in favor of clarity and the sorts of truths that can sting, particularly in the matter of fathers and sons. Old School is his first novel, and it's written in the form of a memoir -- that of an aging scholar looking back over his life -- but you never get the sense that Wolff is trading on the residual affection any reader might hold for This Boy's Life.
NEWS
By Stephen Vicchio | September 15, 1992
THE BOY'S first day of school:I thought it would be one of those unforgettably poignant moments, the kind of experience one files away in some special region of memory so that it might be retrieved for some important purpose later in the boy's life.The bus was to come at 7:55. We were to meet it in front of the SuperFresh. During the short ride, I had imagined, I'd have a pep talk with the 6-year-old. That tiny script writer/director inside my skull had the father talking to the son about making new friends, about paying careful attention to the teacher and about the importance of having fun.In the script in my head I told the boy about how at his age I walked a mile and a half to my West Baltimore grade school,usually in the snow.
FEATURES
By Bruce Westbrook and Bruce Westbrook,Houston Chronicle | December 20, 1993
Big girls don't cry? They do in Hollywood, where they rightly bemoan the quality and quantity of women's roles.Yet little girls are more entitled to Tinseltown tears. Take it from Christina Ricci, show-stealing star of "Addams Family Values.""Everyone talks about women getting snubbed, but what about little girls?" says Miss Ricci, 13. "We have no parts, either. It's all for little boys. And if it's a little girls' part, it's minuscule. It's the girlfriend waving 'hi,' and that's it."Actually, Miss Ricci has less reason to rant than most.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 28, 1994
"Imaginary Crimes" is clearly not from an imaginary life. It's one of a small but definitely growing genre of story-memoirs that are almost always interesting because the lives they re-create are so specific and, usually, painful. (People with happy childhoods appear not to write books about their childhoods). Others of the ilk are "This Boy's Life" and "What's Eating Gilbert Grape?" and even "Corrina, Corrina."The movie, derived from Sheila Ballantyne's novel, examines the life of a bright young woman bobbing in the wake of an erratic parent.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,sumathi.reddy@baltsun.com | August 30, 2008
There was no casket, no bouquets of flowers, no pews filled with people. Instead, there was a small wooden toybox and pictures of a 15-month-old baby drinking his bottle and playing, and the dozen mourners who came to say good-bye to him. "I fought hard to save this little boy's life ... but nobody would help me," said Seeta Khadan-Newton, Javon Thompson's grandmother. "So I was fighting a fight by myself which ended with me losing my grandson and my daughter where she is now." Javon's mother, Ria Ramkissoon, 21, is among five people Baltimore homicide detectives have charged with first-degree murder in connection with the toddler's death.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLLOVE | February 20, 1994
The morning after 10-year old Tauris Johnson was shot to death outside his East Baltimore rowhouse, I was at his bed, examining his teddy bear and a school spelling certificate; vestiges of a little boy's life.On the night of Kerry O'Neill's funeral, I was in her girlhood bedroom listening to her parents mourn their gifted daughter, a young U.S. naval officer murdered by her former fiance.I am not a cleric drawn to the scene of tragedy to lend support to bereaved parishioners. I am not a policeman, searching for evidence to solve a crime.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1997
Start, as the song goes, spreading the news. It's the Orioles who are winning this year. They swept the Yankees in the Bronx in May, finally beat them at Camden Yards this week after last year's humiliating season-long drought and remain way on top of their division.Which would lead one to expect Yankee fans to descend on Camden Yards -- as they inevitably do whenever their team comes to town -- with a little less of their famed swagger, perhaps with more measured decorum in their enthusiasm and, daresay, a certain respect that the vanquished owe their conquerors.
FEATURES
February 25, 1999
"ER" (10 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) continues without George Clooney and instead focuses tonight on Dr. Benton (Eriq LaSalle) as the show takes a vacation from Chicago. Tonight, Benton works at a small clinic in Mississippi to earn extra money to support his deaf son's education. NBC.At a glance"Diagnosis Murder" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- It's a veritable family affair as six Van Dykes turn up on a yarn about a misguided teen turned boxer. Barry Van Dyke, who plays Lt. Sloan, wrote the script.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1997
Start, as the song goes, spreading the news. It's the Orioles who are winning this year. They swept the Yankees in the Bronx in May, finally beat them at Camden Yards this week after last year's humiliating season-long drought and remain way on top of their division.Which would lead one to expect Yankee fans to descend on Camden Yards -- as they inevitably do whenever their team comes to town -- with a little less of their famed swagger, perhaps with more measured decorum in their enthusiasm and, daresay, a certain respect that the vanquished owe their conquerors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 28, 1994
"Imaginary Crimes" is clearly not from an imaginary life. It's one of a small but definitely growing genre of story-memoirs that are almost always interesting because the lives they re-create are so specific and, usually, painful. (People with happy childhoods appear not to write books about their childhoods). Others of the ilk are "This Boy's Life" and "What's Eating Gilbert Grape?" and even "Corrina, Corrina."The movie, derived from Sheila Ballantyne's novel, examines the life of a bright young woman bobbing in the wake of an erratic parent.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 13, 1994
What's surprising about Leonardo DiCaprio is that in person, he isn't all that different from Arnie, whom he plays in "What's Eating Gilbert Grape."That is surprising because Arnie is mentally retarded -- and Mr. DiCaprio most certainly is not.He's a smart, successful 19-year-old with an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor.Mr. DiCaprio is also restless and fidgety. His eyes roam, his fingers pester his face, his arms and upper body go all gangly. He seems to be somewhere else -- or to want to be.But on this evening several weeks before the Oscar nominations, he is trapped in an office on the Paramount lot.Inside the nearby Paramount theater are insiders -- friends of the producers, friends of friends of the producers, Paramount queen Sherry Lansing -- all attending a celebration screening of "Gilbert Grape."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLLOVE | February 20, 1994
The morning after 10-year old Tauris Johnson was shot to death outside his East Baltimore rowhouse, I was at his bed, examining his teddy bear and a school spelling certificate; vestiges of a little boy's life.On the night of Kerry O'Neill's funeral, I was in her girlhood bedroom listening to her parents mourn their gifted daughter, a young U.S. naval officer murdered by her former fiance.I am not a cleric drawn to the scene of tragedy to lend support to bereaved parishioners. I am not a policeman, searching for evidence to solve a crime.
FEATURES
By Bruce Westbrook and Bruce Westbrook,Houston Chronicle | December 20, 1993
Big girls don't cry? They do in Hollywood, where they rightly bemoan the quality and quantity of women's roles.Yet little girls are more entitled to Tinseltown tears. Take it from Christina Ricci, show-stealing star of "Addams Family Values.""Everyone talks about women getting snubbed, but what about little girls?" says Miss Ricci, 13. "We have no parts, either. It's all for little boys. And if it's a little girls' part, it's minuscule. It's the girlfriend waving 'hi,' and that's it."Actually, Miss Ricci has less reason to rant than most.
FEATURES
February 25, 1999
"ER" (10 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) continues without George Clooney and instead focuses tonight on Dr. Benton (Eriq LaSalle) as the show takes a vacation from Chicago. Tonight, Benton works at a small clinic in Mississippi to earn extra money to support his deaf son's education. NBC.At a glance"Diagnosis Murder" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- It's a veritable family affair as six Van Dykes turn up on a yarn about a misguided teen turned boxer. Barry Van Dyke, who plays Lt. Sloan, wrote the script.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Tucker and Ken Tucker,Special to the Sun | November 23, 2003
Old School, by Tobias Wolff. Knopf. 198 pages. $22. Tobias Wolff is the author of numerous collections of exemplary short stories as well as the celebrated memoir This Boy's Life. Wolff is a master of reverie, avoiding sentimentality in favor of clarity and the sorts of truths that can sting, particularly in the matter of fathers and sons. Old School is his first novel, and it's written in the form of a memoir -- that of an aging scholar looking back over his life -- but you never get the sense that Wolff is trading on the residual affection any reader might hold for This Boy's Life.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 23, 1993
All boys' lives are different in details, but all are the same, too, in the larger outline. And the largest outline of all sooner or later belongs to that caricature of horror and terror, that buffoon and bully, that dark, unreachable tyrant, that stupid, uncool moron -- the father figure."
NEWS
By Stephen Vicchio | September 15, 1992
THE BOY'S first day of school:I thought it would be one of those unforgettably poignant moments, the kind of experience one files away in some special region of memory so that it might be retrieved for some important purpose later in the boy's life.The bus was to come at 7:55. We were to meet it in front of the SuperFresh. During the short ride, I had imagined, I'd have a pep talk with the 6-year-old. That tiny script writer/director inside my skull had the father talking to the son about making new friends, about paying careful attention to the teacher and about the importance of having fun.In the script in my head I told the boy about how at his age I walked a mile and a half to my West Baltimore grade school,usually in the snow.
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