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By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Did I hear about a new boxwood disease? I want to plant boxwood this year, because deer don't eat it. What do you think? Boxwood boasts glossy evergreen leaves, a sedate growth habit that doesn't demand constant pruning, and deer actually leave it alone. But, yes, boxwood blight was found last year in Virginia, North Carolina, Massachusetts, and in one nursery in Maryland. We don't know how it got here from Europe, where it has devastated boxwood, but it's a good reminder why travelers should not bring home even a dry sprig of plant material.
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
People with old boxwoods are being warned not to plant new boxwoods nearby, but what about those of us with no boxwoods who want some? They're so deer-resistant. The new and highly contagious boxwood blight disease has made it unwise, for the present, to introduce new, possibly infected plants into a landscape with old boxwood, especially historic boxwood. In your case, buying locally or Southern--grown boxwood would be the safest bet. Keep in mind that boxwood blight can infect both native and Japanese pachysandra as well as sweetbox (Sarcococca)
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
People with old boxwoods are being warned not to plant new boxwoods nearby, but what about those of us with no boxwoods who want some? They're so deer-resistant. The new and highly contagious boxwood blight disease has made it unwise, for the present, to introduce new, possibly infected plants into a landscape with old boxwood, especially historic boxwood. In your case, buying locally or Southern--grown boxwood would be the safest bet. Keep in mind that boxwood blight can infect both native and Japanese pachysandra as well as sweetbox (Sarcococca)
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By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Did I hear about a new boxwood disease? I want to plant boxwood this year, because deer don't eat it. What do you think? Boxwood boasts glossy evergreen leaves, a sedate growth habit that doesn't demand constant pruning, and deer actually leave it alone. But, yes, boxwood blight was found last year in Virginia, North Carolina, Massachusetts, and in one nursery in Maryland. We don't know how it got here from Europe, where it has devastated boxwood, but it's a good reminder why travelers should not bring home even a dry sprig of plant material.
NEWS
February 13, 2000
Q. Last fall I moved into an older home with a long, neglected hedge of boxwoods. They had yellow foliage and looked unhealthy. What can I do to bring them back? A. Boxwoods have a number of insect and disease pests that can produce leaf yellowing symptoms. Several insect pests, including boxwood leaf miners, boxwood mites, scale insectsand boxwood psyllids, suck plant sap, causing leaves to look bleached out. A fungal disease, volutella, may also be responsible for some of the yellowing and dieback.
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By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | March 27, 2005
We have fifteen 35-year-old English boxwoods. Recently, stems or complete branches in the middle of the shrub have died back. We noted a number of spider webs with a distinctive entrance in the web. Ideas? Spiders are predators of insects and would, if anything, benefit the boxwoods. The primary suspect in your case is Volutella, a fungal disease that creates cankers that girdle and kill stems. It also causes orange-bronze-colored or singed-looking leaves in spring. Prune out all infected branches using thinning cuts.
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By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2002
Despite numerous objections from residents and a wavering financial commitment from the Carroll County commissioners, Hampstead Town Council members said last night that they still support the proposed extension of Boxwood Drive. "This road was always designed to take traffic off of residential roads and feed it to bigger roads," said Councilman Wayne H. Thomas. Under the plan, the town eventually would extend the road in two directions, connecting it to Lower Beckleysville Road on the north side and to Trenton Mill Road on the south.
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By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,Universal Press Syndicate | October 19, 2003
Boxwood is back. Gardeners have rediscovered the charm and versatility of what enthusiasts call the "oldest ornamental" and are planting this handsome evergreen shrub in gardens of every conceivable design, from traditional to ultra modern. After a long decline, during which they came to be regarded as stodgy and frumpy, boxwood are once again the height of garden sophistication. Since the days of the Roman Empire, these slow-growing little bushes have been used to outline and embellish gardens with expertly clipped ribbons of deep green.
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By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2002
Hampstead residents will have a second opportunity tonight to register their distress over a planned extension of Boxwood Drive that many say would turn the residential street into a high-speed throughway. As part of a general public hearing on Hampstead's reworked comprehensive plan, residents will plead their case to a panel of county and town officials. The Boxwood extension, an approved and funded project, hadn't caused many ripples in Hampstead before a Town Council meeting Feb. 12, when about 30 residents showed up with stories of how their children would be in danger traversing the extended road.
NEWS
August 11, 1993
FIRE* Hampstead: Hampstead investigated a building alarm on Boxwood Drive at 2:31 p.m. Monday. Units returned to service in 3 minutes.
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By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to The Sun | April 21, 2007
The flower buds on my Cherokee Brave dogwood are dried out. Half the trunk is damaged from deer rubbing their bodies against it. Is it dead? When deer rub their antlers on bark, it damages the cambium layer beneath. The cambium layer transports nutrients and water. It appears your dogwood could not get enough water up to open buds. If the tree leafs out, it may survive the damage, though always suffer from losing so much bark. Water deeply during droughts and mulch (no more than 2-3 inches)
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By NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON and NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2006
For years, we relegated gardens to the back yard or to discretely planted aprons around the house. But lately, gardeners -- hungry for beauty and eager to embellish any bit of earth available -- have begun to create curbside gardens. "People want to see some color when they pull in," says Kelly Williams, manager of Kingsdene Nurseries and Garden Center in Monkton. Many also want to make a personal statement. "They want their house to stand out," Williams added. Curbside gardens can enhance the strip between curb and sidewalk, the napkin of ground around the mailbox, or even the dirt around street trees, which can host a gorgeous collection of tough shade-lovers like hosta and coral bells (Heuchera)
NEWS
December 11, 2005
TODAY HOLIDAY GREENS SALE Purchase poinsettias, wreaths, fresh roping, boxwood trees and swags, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. today at Cylburn Mansion, 4915 Greenspring Ave. Free admission. 410-367-2217. CHRISTMAS AT LADEW The annual holiday celebration includes tours of the decorated Ladew Manor House, live music, visits with Santa and a greens sale, including kissing balls, topiaries, boxwood trees, wreaths and more, at Ladew Topiary Gardens, 3535 Jarrettsville Pike, Monkton. Hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. today.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | March 27, 2005
We have fifteen 35-year-old English boxwoods. Recently, stems or complete branches in the middle of the shrub have died back. We noted a number of spider webs with a distinctive entrance in the web. Ideas? Spiders are predators of insects and would, if anything, benefit the boxwoods. The primary suspect in your case is Volutella, a fungal disease that creates cankers that girdle and kill stems. It also causes orange-bronze-colored or singed-looking leaves in spring. Prune out all infected branches using thinning cuts.
NEWS
October 13, 2004
Margaret S. Hudson, a homemaker and gardener, died of heart failure Friday at Keswick Multi-Care Center. She was 84, and a resident of Roland Park for half a century. Born and raised Margaret Scott Hunt in Dallas, she earned a bachelor's degree in English in 1942 from the University of Texas, where she had been a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority. She worked during World War II in the personnel department of Haggar Clothing Co. and in a similar capacity later at Southern Methodist University.
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By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | December 28, 2003
This spring, I planted three female hollies and one male holly in my back yard. I expected they would pollinate one another and produce fruits, but I got none. What may have happened? There are several reasons why your plants may not have produced fruits. I am not sure what type of holly you planted, but the male and female plants must be compatible for fruiting to occur. In most cases, a male plant will fertilize a female plant within the same species. However, with so many new cultivars on the market, there is a lot of variability in flowering time.
NEWS
February 16, 1995
FIRE LOG* Hampstead: Engines from Hampstead, Manchester and Arcadia were dispatched to a house fire in the 600 block of Boxwood Drive at 5:08 p.m. Tuesday. Units were out for 15 minutes.
NEWS
May 23, 1995
FIRE* Hampstead: Hampstead responded to a car fire on Boxwood Drive at 4:42 p.m. Saturday. Units were out a minute.Hampstead responded to a mulch fire on North Woods Trail at 2:05 p.m. Sunday. Units were out a minute.
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2003
If the members of Helicon ever tried to sneak through a holiday season without performing their annual Winter Solstice Concert, they'd never hear the end of it. Fans of the Baltimore trio, known for its magical renditions of folk melodies from around the world, still mourn the group's dissolution in the mid-1990s. "There was certainly a lot of disappointment out there," says Ken Kolodner, who plays the hammered dulcimer and fiddle. That's why, in part, Kolodner, 49, and fellow group members Chris Norman and Robin Bullock, both 39, reunite every December for the concert, now in its 18th year.
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