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By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1996
No more than rumor and hope for the last 10 years, a local boxing gym may become reality in the next six months if local businessman Scott Wagner has his way.Wagner and his father, Mike Wagner, own Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie, and they have taken an ambitious approach to making boxing succeed in Anne Arundel County."
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SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | September 26, 2007
TEMPLE HILLS-- --Out of a small boombox, James Brown is preaching about shaking your moneymaker, getting up and staying on the scene, while the Giant's size 18 feet bounce in steady rhythm on the mat. Way, way up above, the boxer's meaty hands, each the size of a catcher's mitt, punch holes in the humid air. This isn't a place where a champion tries to get to -- it's the kind of place you want to be from. But if someone were to go looking, we're in the no-frills boxing gym housed in the basement of a suburban Washington strip mall, as far away from fame and glory as you can imagine.
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NEWS
By Pat O'Malley | December 8, 1991
Boxing has its pros and cons because of its aggressive and sometimesbrutal nature, but those who thrive in teaching and promoting it insist that it does much more good than harm.It's a constant among those who love the sport especially in its amateur stage. The number of those who believe it could help curtail increased violence among young people on the streets seems to be rising."People talk about how this and that can help kids, and they usually say, if it helps one kid, it's worthwhile, but I'm convinced if we had a few gyms in Anne Arundel County where kids could box, we could help them tenfold," said Jeff Novotny, former amateur boxer and graduate of Arundel High in Gambrills.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | October 8, 2006
West Baltimore's Gervonta "Tank" Davis took three fierce jabs to the face in the second round, but the 2006 Silver Gloves national champion managed to hold his own yesterday against cross-town upstart Mack Allison IV. Of course, Tank has an unfair advantage: at age 11, he's got two years on Mack, who turned 9 last week. The two baby-faced fighters traded rather adult blows yesterday in a three-round exhibition match at the ceremonial reopening of the city-run Upton Boxing Center, which recently completed a $400,000 renovation.
BUSINESS
By Charles Cohen and Charles Cohen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2000
Poodles' boxing gym has live ghosts -- real people with busted noses who come knocking on Larry Silverstein's door to revisit the second floor where they once sparred. But instead of the boxing ring where Sugar Ray Leonard traded blows, they'll find a modern bathroom with a built-in shower room. The walls of classic boxing posters and photos are gone. And the 60-foot-long first floor now is dominated by a huge granite kitchen counter that transcends the living room and dining room. The counter, which doubles as a swank bar, rises up on a platform, facing four narrow windows overlooking the backside of the old American Can Co. complex in Canton.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2002
The boys stalk each other around the sparring ring, looking for an opening in their opponents' defense, their gloves heavy and cumbersome, their headgear adding awkward weight to their small shoulders. Outside the ring, coaches and trainers yell encouragement and advice: "Pop that jab! ... Move around. ... Keep your hands up. Keep your hands up, boy! ... Get out of there. Get out of there!" Some in the cramped, West Baltimore boxing gym stop to watch the match. Others get on with training of their own. A 4-year-old boy waits to put on a pair of gloves.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | September 26, 2007
TEMPLE HILLS-- --Out of a small boombox, James Brown is preaching about shaking your moneymaker, getting up and staying on the scene, while the Giant's size 18 feet bounce in steady rhythm on the mat. Way, way up above, the boxer's meaty hands, each the size of a catcher's mitt, punch holes in the humid air. This isn't a place where a champion tries to get to -- it's the kind of place you want to be from. But if someone were to go looking, we're in the no-frills boxing gym housed in the basement of a suburban Washington strip mall, as far away from fame and glory as you can imagine.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | May 21, 1993
"I always wonder if I'm seeing the same match as my colleagues. You dread being out of line in the scoring, but you've got to have the confidence to call it as you see it."-- Judge Patricia JarmanWASHINGTON -- A college professor, a former fighter and a health care arbitrator will be judging tomorrow night's heavyweight title match at RFK Stadium between champion Riddick Bowe and challenger Jesse Ferguson.All three judges also happen to be black women.Reportedly, there have been title matches held overseas in which three women served as officials.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein | February 26, 1991
As a youngster, David Izegwire was enthralled by the stories his father, the police chief of Lagos, told of Dick Tiger returning as a conquering hero to his native Nigeria in 1962 after winning the world middleweight title from Gene Fullmer.And he has witnessed the adulation his countrymen display greeting Akeem Olajuwon, the Houston Rockets basketball star, whenever he visits his homeland.A dream of similar success and recognition brought Izegwire to the United States in 1986, but he was not prepared for the nightmares he would have to endure for more than a year.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | October 8, 2006
West Baltimore's Gervonta "Tank" Davis took three fierce jabs to the face in the second round, but the 2006 Silver Gloves national champion managed to hold his own yesterday against cross-town upstart Mack Allison IV. Of course, Tank has an unfair advantage: at age 11, he's got two years on Mack, who turned 9 last week. The two baby-faced fighters traded rather adult blows yesterday in a three-round exhibition match at the ceremonial reopening of the city-run Upton Boxing Center, which recently completed a $400,000 renovation.
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 31, 2002
MARK TUCKER, 43, of Eldersburg, is bringing the sport of amateur boxing to the area by forming the Maryland Boxing Club and holding exhibition fights Jan. 11 at Super Sports, a sports complex in Eldersburg. The exhibition, he says, will feature amateur boxers from New Jersey, Philadelphia, Washington, Baltimore, West Virginia and Salisbury. The boxers will spar in an elevated ring in an event that Tucker describes as Las Vegas-style boxing, complete with "ring card girls." The event will include female boxers.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2002
The boys stalk each other around the sparring ring, looking for an opening in their opponents' defense, their gloves heavy and cumbersome, their headgear adding awkward weight to their small shoulders. Outside the ring, coaches and trainers yell encouragement and advice: "Pop that jab! ... Move around. ... Keep your hands up. Keep your hands up, boy! ... Get out of there. Get out of there!" Some in the cramped, West Baltimore boxing gym stop to watch the match. Others get on with training of their own. A 4-year-old boy waits to put on a pair of gloves.
BUSINESS
By Charles Cohen and Charles Cohen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2000
Poodles' boxing gym has live ghosts -- real people with busted noses who come knocking on Larry Silverstein's door to revisit the second floor where they once sparred. But instead of the boxing ring where Sugar Ray Leonard traded blows, they'll find a modern bathroom with a built-in shower room. The walls of classic boxing posters and photos are gone. And the 60-foot-long first floor now is dominated by a huge granite kitchen counter that transcends the living room and dining room. The counter, which doubles as a swank bar, rises up on a platform, facing four narrow windows overlooking the backside of the old American Can Co. complex in Canton.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1999
At age 12, Marvin W. McDowell Jr. needed direction in his life, so he turned to fighting.The West Baltimore youth joined a city boxing program, which taught him discipline and dedication. He became an amateur boxing champion, winning six South Atlantic Amateur titles in the 1970s. He earned his way into the Maryland Boxing Hall of Fame three years ago.McDowell, 37, wants to give the same opportunity to city youths by opening an innovative community center in West Baltimore. In a program that would combine mentoring, tutoring and athletics, teachers would volunteer to help youths with their studies and monitor their academic progress while the youths receive boxing training.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1996
No more than rumor and hope for the last 10 years, a local boxing gym may become reality in the next six months if local businessman Scott Wagner has his way.Wagner and his father, Mike Wagner, own Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie, and they have taken an ambitious approach to making boxing succeed in Anne Arundel County."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1995
A boxing gym is generally not the best place to see democracy in action. A caste system usually exists, with preliminary fighters, main event boxers and ring champions assuming a pecking order in the way they are treated in and out of the ring.But that's not the case at Mack Lewis' Eager Street gym, which houses a world champion in International Boxing Federation junior middleweight king Vincent Pettway, and a half-dozen aspiring professional fighters, including welterweight Wade Duncan (10-2-2)
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1995
A boxing gym is generally not the best place to see democracy in action. A caste system usually exists, with preliminary fighters, main event boxers and ring champions assuming a pecking order in the way they are treated in and out of the ring.But that's not the case at Mack Lewis' Eager Street gym, which houses a world champion in International Boxing Federation junior middleweight king Vincent Pettway, and a half-dozen aspiring professional fighters, including welterweight Wade Duncan (10-2-2)
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1999
At age 12, Marvin W. McDowell Jr. needed direction in his life, so he turned to fighting.The West Baltimore youth joined a city boxing program, which taught him discipline and dedication. He became an amateur boxing champion, winning six South Atlantic Amateur titles in the 1970s. He earned his way into the Maryland Boxing Hall of Fame three years ago.McDowell, 37, wants to give the same opportunity to city youths by opening an innovative community center in West Baltimore. In a program that would combine mentoring, tutoring and athletics, teachers would volunteer to help youths with their studies and monitor their academic progress while the youths receive boxing training.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | May 21, 1993
"I always wonder if I'm seeing the same match as my colleagues. You dread being out of line in the scoring, but you've got to have the confidence to call it as you see it."-- Judge Patricia JarmanWASHINGTON -- A college professor, a former fighter and a health care arbitrator will be judging tomorrow night's heavyweight title match at RFK Stadium between champion Riddick Bowe and challenger Jesse Ferguson.All three judges also happen to be black women.Reportedly, there have been title matches held overseas in which three women served as officials.
NEWS
By Pat O'Malley | December 8, 1991
Boxing has its pros and cons because of its aggressive and sometimesbrutal nature, but those who thrive in teaching and promoting it insist that it does much more good than harm.It's a constant among those who love the sport especially in its amateur stage. The number of those who believe it could help curtail increased violence among young people on the streets seems to be rising."People talk about how this and that can help kids, and they usually say, if it helps one kid, it's worthwhile, but I'm convinced if we had a few gyms in Anne Arundel County where kids could box, we could help them tenfold," said Jeff Novotny, former amateur boxer and graduate of Arundel High in Gambrills.
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