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NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2013
Raymond Leroy Klingmeyer, a former boxer and referee who is a member of the state's boxing Hall of Fame, died Friday of renal failure at the Bel Air Health and Rehabilitation Center. He was 88. "When he came into the ring, he looked like a referee. He had a presence, like an old-time referee … that commanded the respect of the boxers," said Patrick Pannella, executive director of the Maryland State Athletic Commission. "He was knowledgeable about any possible event that could happen in the ring," Mr. Pannella said.
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NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff writer | October 31, 1991
To fight again, or not to fight again?Glen Burnie boxer Chuck Sturm walked into Dr. Mark W. Preslan's office yesterday expecting a "yes" or "no" answer.The answer he got was a definite "maybe."As a professional boxer, Sturm is probably the biggest draw at Glen Burnie's La Fontaine Bleu.But because of damage to the fourth nerve in his right eye, Sturm has been "seeing double" for at least 15 months. For the last year, his battles have moved from the four corners of the ring to the four walls of doctors' offices.
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | January 31, 2006
Marcus Henry doesn't have to be a boxer - not with the looks of a model and his job as a computer programmer. But the Parkville resident says he's "in it for the love of the sport," which is why he swaps hours of excellent pay for trading blows during the grueling sparring sessions it takes to be an amateur boxer who travels nationwide and abroad while working toward becoming a professional world champion. U.S. vs. Belarus exhibition Tonight, 8, Michael's Eighth Avenue, Glen Burnie
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2000
A year after his life story became a Hollywood event, former boxer Rubin Carter says the message of hope in the movie "The Hurricane" was overshadowed at times by criticism that the movie swung fast and loose with the facts. Carter said sharp scrutiny of the film was fueled primarily by journalists and lawyers upset that their minor roles in the long legal battle to overturn the triple murder convictions against himself and a young fan, John Artis, weren't portrayed on the big screen. "They did more to murder this film than they did to get John Artis and myself out of prison," said Carter, 64, who is scheduled to speak tonight at the Johns Hopkins University about inequities in the judicial system.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 9, 1998
Partway through "The Boxer," amateur fighter Danny-Boy Flynn, played by Daniel Day-Lewis, is engaged in a crucial boxing match in Belfast. Not only has the fight become a political metaphor, but it is also a means by which Danny-Boy might seduce a former girlfriend, who sits in the gallery. During the triumphant bout, while the steam and beery cheers of the audience rise, Danny-Boy shoots her a glance captured in a camera flash.It passes in a nanosecond, but that one look -- fierce, glittering, animal -- is a defining moment in "The Boxer," a fine new film from director and co-writer Jim Sheridan.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | June 17, 2008
As an amateur boxer, safety Tom Zbikowski had more than 70 fights, but none like the one he is about to enter when the Ravens open training camp July 21. The Ravens return two starting safeties, Ed Reed and Dawan Landry, and they really like Jim Leonhard, a fourth-year free agent added during the offseason. The Ravens usually keep four on the roster, and if they had to start the season now, sixth-round draft pick Haruki Nakamura would probably beat out Zbikowski for the final spot. But, because a final decision won't be made for several months, that gives Zbikowski time to prepare.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2000
When an emerging high-tech company is ready to leave the garage for real offices, its goals generally dwarf its budget. And start-ups, prone to explosive growth or bankruptcy, don't always know how much space they'll need tomorrow, if any. This is unnerving for both landlords - more comfortable with big security deposits and five-year commitments - and techies needing to sign a lease. And while city leaders say the commercial real estate community has done a good job making space available and courting highly desirable tech companies, landlords won't cut deals in strong economic times.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2001
When boxer Bernard Hopkins entered the ring and took off his robe earlier this month at Madison Square Garden in New York, he showed off more than his rippled physique. Written in large letters across his back in a temporary tattoo was "Goldenpalace.com," an advertisement for an online casino that, according to Bloomberg News, is believed to be the first endorsement of its kind by a North American professional athlete. The tattoo didn't last long -- the dye ran when Hopkins started to sweat and was washed off by the third round.
NEWS
By Sonni Efron and Sonni Efron,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 23, 1999
TOKYO -- In a concrete and neon canyon in Japan's most famous drinking district, the boxer stands ready to become a human punching bag."Please hit me," he calls out to the crowd of gawkers that quickly forms. A one-minute all-you-can-slug session costs $9 for men. Women may vent their aggression for half-price. The boxer wears a mouthpiece and headgear, but he doesn't raise his fists to block the blows. His defense is limited to ducking, at which he excels.Since February, when financial desperation drove him into the streets, Akira Hareruya, a former professional boxer once ranked 17th in Japan, has suffered bloody noses, black eyes and broken ribs.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1998
THERE ARE plenty of reasons to resent Andrew Segal. He's successful, the owner of one of the fastest-growing private commercial real estate companies in the nation.He's getting rich: Segal's Boxer Property rakes in $40 million a year in rents.He is largely self-made, having parlayed, in just six years, a single Dallas office building into a portfolio of more than 60 projects in four states.He's just 31 years old. He is charming and persuasive, too.Segal is also a newlywed, as of yesterday.
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