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By Donald Vitek | October 14, 1990
One and one-sixteenth inches with a quarter inch reverse pitch; three quarters of an inch and thirteen-sixteenths-inch with a pitch.All tenpin bowlers should recognize that. It's the formula for drilling a bowling ball. The above measurements happen to be the ones that Earl Anthony used when he was at the top of his game.Drilling your ball properly is probably the most important thing to do to increase your average. It's more important than shoes, more important than the wrist-bands, maybe even more important than how much you practice.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Several months before his bat toss drew national headlines and a pending five-game suspension, Orioles third baseman Manny Machado wanted to find a way to give back to the city of Baltimore. The 21-year-old had attended a few charity events in the offseason and decided he wanted to hold one in his in-season home, and so on Thursday's day off, he held the first Manny Machado Celebrity BaseBowl bowling tournament to benefit the Baltimore City Recreation and Parks' Play Baseball summer program.  “I'm Miami 305 to the heart," said Machado, referencing the city's area code, "but Baltimore is my city, too. This is where I play, this is where I live half the year, so any way I can give back to this community here, it's a great way and opportunity to do it.” With a decision on his suspension appeal looming - he had his appeal hearing before Wednesday's game - Machado was eager to put the events of the past two weeks behind him. “It's been a long 24 hours,” Machado said.
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SPORTS
By DON VITEK | June 20, 1993
The Pierce Cleaners team consisting of Jim and Debbie Doyle, Mickey Mathias and Dolores and Dan Spytowski recently won the Brunswick Normandy In-House Team Tournament.Debbie Doyle, daughter of the Spytowskis, has been bowling, off and on, for about 15 years. The Catonsville resident, wife of Jim Doyle, uses a 14-pound Burgundy Hammer bowling ball."Since I started using the new Hammer my average has jumped about 15 pins," she said. "I'm sure part of the reason is that now I'm throwing a fingertip grip [ball]
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special To The Sun | July 20, 2008
Bill Boucher used to bowl when he was younger, but he hadn't played in years, he said. But when he saw a Nintendo Wii game set up at the Bain Center in Columbia, he decided to try a virtual version of the game. The 80-year-old Clarksville resident quickly got the hang of it, bowling strikes and splits by holding a remote control and moving his body as though he were really bowling. "It's a weird feeling, but fun," he said during a game last week against a few other players at the center.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | November 7, 1993
To practice or not to practice -- it's a question that keeps coming up time after time.On the one hand are the bowlers who tell you that without practice a decent average is impossible; on the other hand are the folks who don't practice and still put up the numbers. So far this season we have at least one of each at Brunswick Normandy -- Jeff Baker and Richard Lockie.Baker, a Nebraska native who lives in Ellicott City, bowls in three leagues -- the Thursday Mixed and the Friday BG&E at Normandy and the Monday men's league at Fair Lanes Kings Point in Randallstown.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | August 7, 1994
County Lanes in Westminster was the scene for the Marc Rickels Memorial Fund Tenpin Singles Bowling Tournament. Five dollars of each entry fee was collected for the Rickels Fund.Seventy-two entries generated $360; a cake sale added $116, and 50-50 raffles sent the total over $500.When the last bowling ball rolled into the pit, four pins separated the top three competitors.Jennifer Roe fired scratch games of 211, 199 and 214 and added 141 handicapped pins for the winning total of 765. That 624 three-game set was a career high for the Westminster resident.
SPORTS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | August 29, 1993
Nine years ago, Walt Cervenka crushed his bowling hand during a drag racing accident at Capital Raceway.The tragic episode ultimately propelled Cervenka into the bowling business and into developing what he says is the best system for fitting and drilling tenpin bowling balls.It's called Photo Fit. Cervenka, the owner of Cervenka's Pro Shop at Fair Lanes Ritchie in Glen Burnie, actually makes a photocopy of a bowler's hand to more accurately drill a bowling ball.But back when he injured his own hand, Cervenka didn't own a bowler's pro shop.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | March 28, 1993
A 245 tenpin game is good, a second 245 is very good, a third 245 is excellent. A set of three 245 games is. . . "It's odd," Percy Mack said.And Mack was the guy who fashioned the 245 triplicate score at Brunswick Normandy on March 10 in the Funtime Anytime league.Mack, a retired physical education teacher from the Baltimore City school system, bowls tenpins, teaches tenpin bowling, coaches the Catonsville Community College bowling team and is the District 6 vice president for the Greater Baltimore Bowling Association.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | March 5, 1995
Barbie Bryant has been bowling tenpins for "about four or five years."The Ellicott City native now lives in Catonsville and bowls two nights a week -- Sunday's Colts and Fillies and the Wednesday Social Security league at Brunswick Normandy.For Bryant the league bowling is a way to escape the pressure of her work; she's a nurse at Johns Hopkins Hospital in the intensive care unit.That doesn't mean that she doesn't take her bowling seriously, she does. You can't carry an average in the 190s without concentration and dedication.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | March 14, 1993
Todd Schaeffer, Amy Rosenberger and Kevin McKenzie, youth bowlers at Hampstead Bowling Center, went to the Baltimore YABA Championship Tournament at Fair Lanes Southdale, to bowl against the best young bowlers in the Baltimore area last month.Schaeffer and Rosenberger captured first place in the Junior Mixed Doubles event. They dropped 1,266 pins.Schaeffer, with 2,037 pins, won the Junior Boys All Events title and was just four pins below the winner of the Junior Boys individual division, dropping 711 pins to claim second place.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2000
Climb down the stairs past the neon blue and canary yellow walls and you'll find a slice of hon heaven. Short, squat pins fly here and there as midget balls glide along the wooden boards. But it's not just duckpin bowling, the game invented in Baltimore in 1900, that most of the clientele seek at Taylor's Stoneleigh Duckpin Bowling Center. They're drawn by the down-home, slap-on-the-back flavor of the 52-year-old alley. What makes the place unique, patrons say, is that this haven for a working-class game is in the middle of a Baltimore County neighborhood better known for its soccer moms, bagel shops and tree-lined roads.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1998
A sixth of the Baltimore area's remaining duckpin bowling alleys went out of business during the holiday weekend, and another is switching entirely to tenpin lanes -- ominous signs that the game with midget balls and pins is fading from its nativelandscape.Slated to shut down by todayare three alleys operated by AMF Bowling: the Joppa Center in the 1600 block of E. Joppa Road in Towson, Harford Center in the 6100 block of Harford Road in Northeast Baltimore, and Middlesex Center in the 1100 block of Eastern Blvd.
NEWS
By Tonya Jameson and Tonya Jameson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 14, 1997
Grasping a 16-pound bowling ball close to his chest, the 13-year-old Columbia boy stared down the shiny lane. He swung his left arm back, then forward and the ball hurried down toward a precise collision with the pins. A strike.The fall of all the pins did not provoke a celebration from Bob Helman, an eighth-grader at Owen Brown Middle School, only a confident smile and an exchange of low fives with his teammates. At Helman's level of bowling, strikes aren't surprises, they are expected.Bob is one of the youngest of the 30 teen-agers in the junior-major division, age 13-21, of the Laurel Boys and Girls Club bowling league.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1996
A group of fifth- and sixth-graders at Linthicum Elementary School turned classmates into robots and ran them into walls -- all in the name of science.Under the watchful eye of engineers from Northrop-Grumman Corp. Friday, the students guided their robo-classmates through a maze as they learned about computer programming.The youngsters are taking part in Discover E, a program started in 1990 by the National Society of Professional Engineers to encourage students to pursue careers in engineering.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | May 7, 1995
Mike McKenzie will be 19 years old Wednesday. It also will mark the first season in an adult tenpin league for the Manchester native.On April 13 he made sure he received a great birthday present.McKenzie had a fine youth career in the Young American Bowling Alliance. He progressed steadily from his beginning as an eighth-grader, learning the fundamentals, practicing when time permitted, bowling every Saturday morning at Hampstead Bowling Center in the YABA league, building his average every year and finally competing in youth tournaments.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | April 23, 1995
Anita Manger started bowling duckpins at Fair Lanes Middlesex when she was 5 years old.The Arnold resident switched to tenpins, fell in love with the game, and has never left it.Active in two leagues, the Thursday Challengers at Fair Lanes Southdale and the Tuesday Budweiser at Greenway Bowl Odenton, she currently is averaging 188."I think that my average will start to go up," Manger said. "When I changed to the Beast [bowling ball] a lot of good things started to happen."Until the past few months, she had been using a 12-pound Rhino; now the left-hander is throwing a 13-pound Beast.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | May 8, 1994
Mike Spencer and Bill Williams Jr. bowl at Bel Air Bowl. Neither set out to do any teaching but recently, by example, they proved a couple of points.One: you don't have to be a cranker to score well on the tenpin lanes.Two: It pays to know your equipment, and it pays to be able to make a lane adjustment when it's necessary.Williams of Aberdeen bowls in the Tuesday Twinighters at Bel Air Bowl and carries a 204 average.He started bowling when he was 8 years old; now 24, he has a career-high set of 758 and just posted his fourth perfect game.
NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | August 9, 1992
Nobody laughs at Roger Varga's four-hole bowling now.Roger Varga, a Bowie resident, won the National Amateur Bowlers Inc. tournament last Sunday at Brunswick Normandy lanes in Ellicott City, beating a field of 152 amateur bowlers and capturing the first prize of $1,000."
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | April 16, 1995
Uppy Webb Jr. of Catonsville has been bowling tenpins for a long time and still doesn't completely understand the sport.Until April 5, his best game and set were 278 and 698, respectively. Not bad for a 190-average bowler, who bowls in only one league -- the Wednesday Special -- at Brunswick Normandy.Throwing a 16-pound Dick Weber Legend bowling ball (recommended, fitted and drilled by Howard Marshall), Webb pounded out his career-high individual game and set.His first game of the night was a 255; then came a disappointing 189. But Webb wasn't through.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | March 5, 1995
Barbie Bryant has been bowling tenpins for "about four or five years."The Ellicott City native now lives in Catonsville and bowls two nights a week -- Sunday's Colts and Fillies and the Wednesday Social Security league at Brunswick Normandy.For Bryant the league bowling is a way to escape the pressure of her work; she's a nurse at Johns Hopkins Hospital in the intensive care unit.That doesn't mean that she doesn't take her bowling seriously, she does. You can't carry an average in the 190s without concentration and dedication.
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