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By James H. Jackson | November 24, 1991
The Barnhardt brothers, Jim and Joe, rolled 300 on the same night in the same league at Country Club Lanes on Pulaski Highway in Middle River.Both were bowling in the Monday Night Men's Scratch League and they bowled their perfect games in different games. Joe had a 754 (237-217-300) set and Jim had a 701 (193-300-208) set.Other 300 games at Country Club Lanes included: Doug Hudack, Jack Hoskins and Jim Brennan in the Baltimore Classic Scratch League; Danny Curtis in the Starfires League; and Chris Shaw in the Monday Men's Handicap League.
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SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | March 29, 2013
Danny Wiseman is practicing at Country Club Lanes on Pulaski Highway, sounding like the 10-pin version of Rodney Dangerfield while expounding on a favorite topic: why bowling gets no respect. "I hate it when they say bowling's not a sport," he says now. "Tell me why it isn't? Because we don't make millions?" I shrug and tell him I have no idea. "Take your best in-shape athlete," he continues, voice rising, "and have him bowl three or four games, and he'll be sore the next day. " I shrug again.
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SPORTS
By James H. Jackson | November 10, 1991
Duckpin bowling is attempting to unseat jousting as the official Maryland state sport, and two good reasons for the change will be contested today in Essex.Two of the major duckpin events in the nation will be bowled at XTC Fair Lanes Middlesex, bringing together the top male and youth bowlers in the country.The Duckpin Professional Bowlers Association Masters Tournament finals, pitting the leading male duckpin bowlers in the world, will be bowled beginning at 9 a.m. and the U.S. Youth Duckpin Invitational Championship, featuring the top boys and girls duckpinners in the nation, will be bowled starting at 10 a.m.Among the entrants in the Masters tournament will be Mike Steinert, Buddy Creamer, John Schramm, Eddie Darling, Bill Honeycutt, Scott Wolgamuth, George Young, Wayne Catlin, Earl Potts, Steve Iavarone and Paddy Lacy.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1997
During his six-year quest to become a professional bowler, Doyle Irons has drawn strength from many sources.From George Branham III, the most prominent African-American bowler on the Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) Tour, to Irons' nearly miraculous recovery from a car accident in 1995 that left him with a broken right wrist and ankle, the 21-year-old from Columbia is driven to succeed.But perhaps the biggest inspiration has been his grandfather, George Jackson, a man who drove his grandson to local bowling tournaments when no one else could.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | September 25, 1994
Steve Burkett started bowling tenpins when he was 14."I bowled in the youth leagues at [Fair Lanes] Dundalk," Burkett said, "And I've never stopped."Working for the Fair Lanes organization for "about six or seven years," most recently as a relief manager, Burkett is now the operations manager at the Southdale center."
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | December 5, 1993
Carl Mealo has been bowling since 1959, and until recently he never had thrown an all-mark game.That changed when he filled every frame for a 197 game. A 125-average duckpin bowler with a career-high game of 224 and high set of 495, Mealo posted the all-mark game without $H throwing a double.Mealo bowls in the Wednesday Majors at Mount Airy Lanes, as well as in the Duckpin Pro Tour and the ADT.A student of the game, Mealo often discusses the mental aspects of bowling with Joe Rineer, proprietor of Mount Airy Lanes.
SPORTS
By James H. Jackson | September 8, 1991
For the third consecutive year, membership in the American Bowling Congress has declined. The ABC, the national governing body for tenpin bowling, had its membership drop to 2,922,829 during the 1990-91 season, down from 3,036,907 -- a loss of 3.7 percent -- from the 1989-90 season.Darold Dobs, ABC executive director, attributes this decline to several factors: the loss of 121 bowling centers, the loss of 32 local bowling associations and general overall decline in the nation's economy."We are not pleased with our continuing membership decline, however it is the lowest in the last three seasons," Dobs said.
NEWS
By Donald Vitek | November 25, 1990
They call him Boomer.Robert Miller was bowling in a tournament called "Meet the Champ" and on one of those balls where you know all 10 duckpins are going to fly into the pit, he turned around on the lane and said, "Boom."While Bob Miller doesn't throw a hard ball, he'll always be stuck with the nickname Boomer.Earlier this month, in the Monday Night Men's league at Mount Airy Lanes, Boomer had one of those nights bowlers dream about; the best game ever and the best set ever. When you're a 128 average bowler, as Miller is, you always think about the 200 game, the 500 series.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | October 3, 1993
Joe Rineer of New Windsor received the 13th annual Distinguished Leadership Award from the the Duckpin Bowling Proprietors of America, and he was a great choice.Rineer, the owner of Mount Airy Lanes, knows the duckpin game from over 30 years of competition, has been a proprietor for 20 years and has worked in the industry since 1969.A past president and current board member of the Baltimore Duckpin Bowlers Association and a member of the Duckpin Professional Bowlers Association, he's served as color commentator for the "Duckpin Magic" TV series.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | April 2, 1995
Patty Palmer was born in Baltimore, the heart of duckpin country.Now living in Hampstead, she has never lost her love for the game. Nor has she lost her desire to be a winner on the lanes.Ranked year after year among the top women duckpin bowlers in the nation according to average, she was notified last week by the National Duckpin Bowling Congress that she placed seventh for the 1994-95 season with a 136 average.Palmer uses different techniques to keep winning. One of those methods was the key to her latest triumph.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | April 2, 1995
Patty Palmer was born in Baltimore, the heart of duckpin country.Now living in Hampstead, she has never lost her love for the game. Nor has she lost her desire to be a winner on the lanes.Ranked year after year among the top women duckpin bowlers in the nation according to average, she was notified last week by the National Duckpin Bowling Congress that she placed seventh for the 1994-95 season with a 136 average.Palmer uses different techniques to keep winning. One of those methods was the key to her latest triumph.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | September 25, 1994
Steve Burkett started bowling tenpins when he was 14."I bowled in the youth leagues at [Fair Lanes] Dundalk," Burkett said, "And I've never stopped."Working for the Fair Lanes organization for "about six or seven years," most recently as a relief manager, Burkett is now the operations manager at the Southdale center."
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | December 5, 1993
Carl Mealo has been bowling since 1959, and until recently he never had thrown an all-mark game.That changed when he filled every frame for a 197 game. A 125-average duckpin bowler with a career-high game of 224 and high set of 495, Mealo posted the all-mark game without $H throwing a double.Mealo bowls in the Wednesday Majors at Mount Airy Lanes, as well as in the Duckpin Pro Tour and the ADT.A student of the game, Mealo often discusses the mental aspects of bowling with Joe Rineer, proprietor of Mount Airy Lanes.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | October 3, 1993
Joe Rineer of New Windsor received the 13th annual Distinguished Leadership Award from the the Duckpin Bowling Proprietors of America, and he was a great choice.Rineer, the owner of Mount Airy Lanes, knows the duckpin game from over 30 years of competition, has been a proprietor for 20 years and has worked in the industry since 1969.A past president and current board member of the Baltimore Duckpin Bowlers Association and a member of the Duckpin Professional Bowlers Association, he's served as color commentator for the "Duckpin Magic" TV series.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | June 7, 1993
Taking a year off didn't hurt Kerry Wille's game; it didn't even slow him down."I started bowling in 1973," Wille said, "And last year is the first year that I didn't bowl."But bowling recently in the Tuesday Arundel League at Bowl American Glen Burnie he broke the house record for a three-game series.The right-hander pounded out games of 277, 278 and 279 for a superb 834 series."I had nine strikes in row, first frame through the ninth, every game," he said. "So, yeah, all of them could have been 300 games, especially the last one."
SPORTS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | November 29, 1992
Keith Butt used to play baseball, and he used to play soccer.But now there's only one sport for the 16-year-old Dundalk High School student."Right now," he says. "Bowling is it."In fact, if all goes as he expects, he'll one day be bowling for a living in the Professional Bowlers Association -- after bowling in college, of course.To those who have watched him bowl at Country Club Lanes, they say Keith has what it takes to make it as a pro bowler.He grew up in Baltimore, but two years ago moved to Savannah, Ga., where his father, Robert Romberger, was stationed at a U.S. Army base in nearby Fort Stewart.
SPORTS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | November 29, 1992
Keith Butt used to play baseball, and he used to play soccer.But now there's only one sport for the 16-year-old Dundalk High School student."Right now," he says. "Bowling is it."In fact, if all goes as he expects, he'll one day be bowling for a living in the Professional Bowlers Association -- after bowling in college, of course.To those who have watched him bowl at Country Club Lanes, they say Keith has what it takes to make it as a pro bowler.He grew up in Baltimore, but two years ago moved to Savannah, Ga., where his father, Robert Romberger, was stationed at a U.S. Army base in nearby Fort Stewart.
NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | September 22, 1991
There are many paths to the professional bowling circuit, but Keith Lescalleet probably found one of the best ways: be born into the bowling industry.His folks once owned Westminster Lanes -- now known as County Lanes. Now 27, Lescalleet started bowling tenpins when he was 12.Lescalleet already has one of the attributes needed by professional bowlers -- the ability to score big when it counts.His high series of 781 was thrown in a tournament and netted him a $500 prize. He has a 300 game to his credit and on Sept.
SPORTS
By James H. Jackson | November 24, 1991
The Barnhardt brothers, Jim and Joe, rolled 300 on the same night in the same league at Country Club Lanes on Pulaski Highway in Middle River.Both were bowling in the Monday Night Men's Scratch League and they bowled their perfect games in different games. Joe had a 754 (237-217-300) set and Jim had a 701 (193-300-208) set.Other 300 games at Country Club Lanes included: Doug Hudack, Jack Hoskins and Jim Brennan in the Baltimore Classic Scratch League; Danny Curtis in the Starfires League; and Chris Shaw in the Monday Men's Handicap League.
SPORTS
By James H. Jackson | November 10, 1991
Duckpin bowling is attempting to unseat jousting as the official Maryland state sport, and two good reasons for the change will be contested today in Essex.Two of the major duckpin events in the nation will be bowled at XTC Fair Lanes Middlesex, bringing together the top male and youth bowlers in the country.The Duckpin Professional Bowlers Association Masters Tournament finals, pitting the leading male duckpin bowlers in the world, will be bowled beginning at 9 a.m. and the U.S. Youth Duckpin Invitational Championship, featuring the top boys and girls duckpinners in the nation, will be bowled starting at 10 a.m.Among the entrants in the Masters tournament will be Mike Steinert, Buddy Creamer, John Schramm, Eddie Darling, Bill Honeycutt, Scott Wolgamuth, George Young, Wayne Catlin, Earl Potts, Steve Iavarone and Paddy Lacy.
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