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Bowl Xxxii

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By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- It's no coincidence that the Green Bay Packers' Dorsey Levens does his best running in the second half.By that time, the Packers usually have secured a lead, the opposing defensive line is worn down, and Levens is warmed up.That's the formula the Packers have followed with great success in two playoff victories to reach Super Bowl XXXII against the Denver Broncos on Sunday.Levens, one of the NFL's rising stars as a fourth-year running back, has produced 70 percent of his 226 rushing yards in the second half this postseason.
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By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1998
The Denver Broncos showed us how it can be done.Blitz Brett Favre until he's looking out the earhole of his helmet, not the face mask.Then unleash a hard-charging running back who cuts back and watch the ponderous Gilbert Brown grab for grass.Only the Broncos have running back Terrell Davis, MVP of Super Bowl XXXII, of course. But in the wake of Denver's 31-24 victory over the Green Bay Packers last January, every playoff contender now has renewed hope.Once the Broncos broke the NFC's 13-year stranglehold on the Super Bowl, it became a whole new playoff world in the NFL.If a wild-card team from the AFC -- indeed, a four-time Super Bowl loser, at that -- can beat the mighty Packers, why not the Pittsburgh Steelers?
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SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- The running for the easy part for Terrell Davis last night in Super Bowl XXXII.The tougher job was talking about it.Davis, who came out in the second period with what he thought was the onset of a migraine headache, cut short his time in the spotlight on the MVP podium after the game.He said he felt faint and asked to be taken in the locker room after speaking for a few minutes.Davis, who rushed for 157 yards in the Denver Broncos' 31-24 victory over the Green Bay Packers in Super Bowl XXXII to win MVP honors, said, "I got dinged.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- The running for the easy part for Terrell Davis last night in Super Bowl XXXII.The tougher job was talking about it.Davis, who came out in the second period with what he thought was the onset of a migraine headache, cut short his time in the spotlight on the MVP podium after the game.He said he felt faint and asked to be taken in the locker room after speaking for a few minutes.Davis, who rushed for 157 yards in the Denver Broncos' 31-24 victory over the Green Bay Packers in Super Bowl XXXII to win MVP honors, said, "I got dinged.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- Although the Broncos came into Super Bowl XXXII with the NFL's top-ranked offense behind the AFC's best rusher in Terrell Davis, much of the pre-game analysis centered on the matchups that awaited Denver's superb offensive line.How would the Broncos handle 345-pound (probably more like 375) run-stuffer Gilbert Brown in the interior? How would they contend with defensive ends Reggie White and Gabe Wilkins, who supposedly would keep Davis from breaking runs off-tackle? How would they handle a defensive front that had helped the Packers hold two postseason opponents to 17 points?
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- For the Denver Broncos to have any chance of stopping Green Bay's rushing attack, the Broncos must get the best game of the season from starting defensive ends Neil Smith and Alfred Williams, and tackles Keith Traylor and Maa Tanuvasa.Then, the Broncos need equal run-support effort from safeties Steve Atwater and Tyrone Braxton.Green Bay enters Super Bowl XXXII with one of the most punishing ground games in the league, averaging 119.3 yards a game, and paced by running back Dorsey Levens, one of the team's most versatile athletes.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- Having exposed the myth of San Francisco's revived running game already this month, the Green Bay Packers will tackle the real deal in Super Bowl XXXII.Terrell Davis, say hello to Gilbert Brown.This is a collision waiting to happen, Denver's rugged Pro Bowl running back slamming into Green Bay's immovable nose tackle. To the winner goes the spoils?If Davis can move the ball on the Packers, he can keep Green Bay quarterback Brett Favre off the field. If he can't, Favre can have a field day.Davis, AFC rushing champ the past two years, is that important to the Broncos.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- One of the AFC's slickest passing games meets one of the NFC's stickier pass defenses in Super Bowl XXXII, and the key to the matchup is how well Denver handles Green Bay's assortment of blitzes.The Broncos have had varied success against a full-scale blitz this season. They did not handle it well in a regular-season loss to the San Francisco 49ers. But they more than held their own against the Pittsburgh Steelers in the AFC championship game two weeks ago.The Packers, meanwhile, have used the blitz as a major weapon down the stretch.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- The Denver Broncos are limited in the way they can attack Green Bay's passing game because cornerbacks Ray Crockett and Darrien Gordon don't match up well with Green Bay receivers Antonio Freeman and Robert Brooks.It may be the greatest mismatch in Super Bowl XXXII.Crockett can't turn and cover deep routes and Gordon lacks ball awareness skills that make him vulnerable to play-action fakes.So expect the Broncos to play a lot of zone and rotate the safeties to the outside so they won't give up big plays.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- As one of the more fashionable weapons in the Green Bay defense, and as a guy who can let fly with a good quote as deftly as he can drop a receiver or break up a pass, safety LeRoy Butler draws his share of attention.But, while you're waiting to see where Butler lines up in defensive coordinator Fritz Shurmur's imaginative schemes, or from what angle he blitzes Denver quarterback John Elway, don't forget to notice free safety Eugene Robinson.Robinson, a 13-year veteran who spent 11 years with the Seattle Seahawks before getting traded to the Packers just before the start of their 1996 training camp, gets better with age. He leads active players with 49 career interceptions.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1998
DENVER -- Church bells rang.Broncos fans ran from bars in the popular Lodo district and fell on their knees in the streets. Police on horseback stood ready, others in riot gear blocked off roads.One fan careened crazily down the street, tears in his eyes."John Elway," he said, hugging a stranger before rushing on.John Elway and the Denver Broncos ended 20 years of frustration for themselves and their fans last night, with a 31-24 victory over the Green Bay Packers.In Denver, their fans released their pent-up emotions as the sound of victory grew and grew until it echoed down every street, through every wall reaching other Broncos fans and still others who could care less, as they looked up from their dinners in wonder at the sounds of horns, automatic weapon fire, sirens and people cheering.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- Although the Broncos came into Super Bowl XXXII with the NFL's top-ranked offense behind the AFC's best rusher in Terrell Davis, much of the pre-game analysis centered on the matchups that awaited Denver's superb offensive line.How would the Broncos handle 345-pound (probably more like 375) run-stuffer Gilbert Brown in the interior? How would they contend with defensive ends Reggie White and Gabe Wilkins, who supposedly would keep Davis from breaking runs off-tackle? How would they handle a defensive front that had helped the Packers hold two postseason opponents to 17 points?
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- The AFC finally beat the NFC at its own game in the Super Bowl last night.Ending the NFC's 13-year reign of supremacy, the Denver Broncos played like a physical NFC team in upsetting the Green Bay Packers, 31-24, in Super Bowl XXXII.Terrell Davis played the role of Emmitt Smith or Roger Craig as he thundered for 157 yards and three touchdowns.The Packers, meanwhile, looked like one of those losing AFC teams as they turned the ball over three times. Brett Favre threw an interception, fumbled and didn't make the big play when he needed to.John Elway, the sentimental favorite, finally got his Super Bowl ring, but he turned in his typical lackluster Super Bowl effort.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- The losing stopped here for John Elway, the Denver Broncos and the AFC last night.Elway finally got the crowning jewel to his Hall of Fame career when the underdog Broncos upset the defending champion Green Bay Packers, 31-24, in Super Bowl XXXII.It took a MVP performance by running back Terrell Davis, a tenacious blitzing scheme on defense, and a sizable chip on Denver's shoulder to get Elway's first Super Bowl win after three losses."This is what I play for," Elway said after a modest 12-for-22 passing performance that produced 123 yards.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- The difference between the Green Bay Packers and the Denver Broncos is running back Terrell Davis.Forget the offensive line. Forget the hard-hitting safeties. And forget John Elway. Terrell Davis is the Denver Broncos. Instead of the final score reading Denver 31, Green Bay 24, maybe this is more appropriate.Davis 31, Packers 24.Davis gives Denver a running game. He takes pressure off Elway, who threw for only 123 yards last night. His running ability also helps the Broncos control the clock and keep their defense off the field.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- No practical joke is too low, no goal too high for the Big Cheese of the Green Bay Packers. With Brett Favre, every day is the Mardi Gras, even when he's not in New Orleans."
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