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NEWS
December 14, 2004
On December 12, 2004, MARY ELIZABETH (nee Siffrin) beloved wife of the late Wilbur C. Bowery, dear sister of the late Harry, William, Oliver, and Frederick Siffrin, dear aunt of Thomas and Sandra L. Siffrin. Friends may call at the WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, 1630 Edmondson Avenue (1 mile west of beltway exit 14) on Tuesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P. M where services will be held on Wednesday at 12 noon. Interment Meadowridge Memorial Park Cemetery.
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NEWS
December 14, 2004
On December 12, 2004, MARY ELIZABETH (nee Siffrin) beloved wife of the late Wilbur C. Bowery, dear sister of the late Harry, William, Oliver, and Frederick Siffrin, dear aunt of Thomas and Sandra L. Siffrin. Friends may call at the WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, 1630 Edmondson Avenue (1 mile west of beltway exit 14) on Tuesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P. M where services will be held on Wednesday at 12 noon. Interment Meadowridge Memorial Park Cemetery.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | August 13, 2000
"Flophouse: Life on the Bowery," by David Isay and Stacy Abramson, photographs by Harvey Wang (Random House, 164 pages, $24.95) Until the term "homeless" was engineered into the language, America's skid rows were populated by the down and out. Today, even New York's Bowery has been largely transformed. But in New York there remain eight traditional flop houses. This brilliantly photographed and lovingly written book takes readers to the hearts of four of them and profiles 50 of their denizens, whose homes are "part prison, part way station, part shelter, part psychiatric hospital, part shooting gallery, part old age home."
NEWS
June 3, 2002
Nathan Smith, 65, who managed one of the last remaining Bowery flophouses, died of cancer May 26 in New York. For more than 16 years, Mr. Smith lived at the Sunshine Hotel on the Bowery, a New York street that was once notorious as a home to alcoholics and drifters. The Sunshine, which opened in the early 1920s, provided a place for men down on their luck to sleep for $10 a night. In recent years, Mr. Smith was featured in a documentary on the Bowery on National Public Radio and in a book, Flophouse: Life on the Bowery.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney tHC LvB | November 26, 1991
The federal government will put a piece of Baltimore history on the auction block Jan. 27, as the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. will try to sell off the Radisson Lord Baltimore Hotel.The partnership that nominally owns the hotel, LBH Associates of Rockville, has defaulted on loans to the city of Baltimore and Bowery Savings Bank of New York, which has been taken over by the FDIC. Baltimore is owed about $7 million.Paul R. Cooper, vice president of Alex. Cooper Auctioneers Inc. in Towson, which will conduct the auction, said the city isn't likely to get its money back.
NEWS
June 22, 1995
MIchael Greenberg, 67, gloved the drunken and the dispossessed, the penniless and the panhandlers.For 30 straight winters, "Gloves" Greenberg was the holiday haberdasher of New York's Bowery section, single-handedly distributing free gloves to the needy between Thanksgiving and Christmas.Mr. Greenberg, an advertising executive, died Monday of cancer, an illness that last winter halted his glove handouts for the first time since 1963.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | January 28, 1992
The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. bought the Radisson Plaza Lord Baltimore Hotel at auction yesterday for $6.85 million, closing the books on a failed effort to restore the 66-year-old hotel to its glory days.The FDIC put the property up for auction after LBH Associates L.P. of Rockville defaulted on a $16 million promissory note from Bowery Savings of New York. The federal agency will take title to the hotel after a Circuit Court judge in Baltimore certifies the sale.LBH received its original loan in 1985 from both Bowery and Yorkridge-Calvert Savings & Loan of Baltimore, but Bowery bought out Yorkridge's interest in 1986.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 15, 1999
An unidentified man was killed late Saturday when he was struck by an Amtrak passenger train that was leaving the Baltimore-Washington International Airport station, a railroad spokesman said.Amtrak police would not release the identity of the victim and said the accident is being investigated.Amtrak spokesman Russ Hall said train No. 198, the Bowery -- an engine and six passenger cars en route to New York from Washington -- struck the man about 11: 06 p.m. about 200 feet from the station.
NEWS
June 3, 2002
Nathan Smith, 65, who managed one of the last remaining Bowery flophouses, died of cancer May 26 in New York. For more than 16 years, Mr. Smith lived at the Sunshine Hotel on the Bowery, a New York street that was once notorious as a home to alcoholics and drifters. The Sunshine, which opened in the early 1920s, provided a place for men down on their luck to sleep for $10 a night. In recent years, Mr. Smith was featured in a documentary on the Bowery on National Public Radio and in a book, Flophouse: Life on the Bowery.
FEATURES
By Mimi Sheraton and Mimi Sheraton,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 15, 1998
It seems that I always need something on Grand Street. The lure on New York's Lower East Side might be yeasty bialys, a concert or bargains in panty hose, linens or toys.In Little Italy, I shop for scamorza, the dried mozzarella properly used in lasagna, or a pasta cutter or a CD of Neapolitan folk songs.Where Chinatown edges into Little Italy, I buy a bamboo steamer, a fresh-killed guinea hen from a live-poultry market or a palate-tingling Malaysian chili crab. Or I find a glass shade for an antique brass lamp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | August 13, 2000
"Flophouse: Life on the Bowery," by David Isay and Stacy Abramson, photographs by Harvey Wang (Random House, 164 pages, $24.95) Until the term "homeless" was engineered into the language, America's skid rows were populated by the down and out. Today, even New York's Bowery has been largely transformed. But in New York there remain eight traditional flop houses. This brilliantly photographed and lovingly written book takes readers to the hearts of four of them and profiles 50 of their denizens, whose homes are "part prison, part way station, part shelter, part psychiatric hospital, part shooting gallery, part old age home."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 15, 1999
An unidentified man was killed late Saturday when he was struck by an Amtrak passenger train that was leaving the Baltimore-Washington International Airport station, a railroad spokesman said.Amtrak police would not release the identity of the victim and said the accident is being investigated.Amtrak spokesman Russ Hall said train No. 198, the Bowery -- an engine and six passenger cars en route to New York from Washington -- struck the man about 11: 06 p.m. about 200 feet from the station.
FEATURES
By Mimi Sheraton and Mimi Sheraton,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 15, 1998
It seems that I always need something on Grand Street. The lure on New York's Lower East Side might be yeasty bialys, a concert or bargains in panty hose, linens or toys.In Little Italy, I shop for scamorza, the dried mozzarella properly used in lasagna, or a pasta cutter or a CD of Neapolitan folk songs.Where Chinatown edges into Little Italy, I buy a bamboo steamer, a fresh-killed guinea hen from a live-poultry market or a palate-tingling Malaysian chili crab. Or I find a glass shade for an antique brass lamp.
NEWS
June 22, 1995
MIchael Greenberg, 67, gloved the drunken and the dispossessed, the penniless and the panhandlers.For 30 straight winters, "Gloves" Greenberg was the holiday haberdasher of New York's Bowery section, single-handedly distributing free gloves to the needy between Thanksgiving and Christmas.Mr. Greenberg, an advertising executive, died Monday of cancer, an illness that last winter halted his glove handouts for the first time since 1963.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | January 28, 1992
The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. bought the Radisson Plaza Lord Baltimore Hotel at auction yesterday for $6.85 million, closing the books on a failed effort to restore the 66-year-old hotel to its glory days.The FDIC put the property up for auction after LBH Associates L.P. of Rockville defaulted on a $16 million promissory note from Bowery Savings of New York. The federal agency will take title to the hotel after a Circuit Court judge in Baltimore certifies the sale.LBH received its original loan in 1985 from both Bowery and Yorkridge-Calvert Savings & Loan of Baltimore, but Bowery bought out Yorkridge's interest in 1986.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney tHC LvB | November 26, 1991
The federal government will put a piece of Baltimore history on the auction block Jan. 27, as the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. will try to sell off the Radisson Lord Baltimore Hotel.The partnership that nominally owns the hotel, LBH Associates of Rockville, has defaulted on loans to the city of Baltimore and Bowery Savings Bank of New York, which has been taken over by the FDIC. Baltimore is owed about $7 million.Paul R. Cooper, vice president of Alex. Cooper Auctioneers Inc. in Towson, which will conduct the auction, said the city isn't likely to get its money back.
NEWS
November 29, 1999
William Benedict,82, a character actor best known as "Whitey" in the old Bowery Boys comedies, died Thursday of complications of heart surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said his sister Susanne Quickel.He played Skinny in some of the low-budget East Side Kids films about the exploits of a tough gang of New York youngsters. In the 1940s and '50s, he made regular appearances as Whitey in the Bowery Boys films, popular successors to the East Side Kids.
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