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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm | December 16, 2003
WE THE people just lost one of the good guys. Paul Simon, the Illinois Democrat who always wore a bow tie and a smile, served in the state legislature and then spent 22 consecutive years in Congress - 10 in the House, 12 in the Senate. He died last week at age 75 after undergoing heart surgery and endorsing former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean for president from his hospital bed. Mr. Simon ran for president in 1988. He also sat on the Senate Judiciary Committee that heard the riveting testimony of Clarence Thomas and his accuser, Anita Hill, during Supreme Court confirmation hearings in 1991.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
"Looking for a Plus-One" is brimming with restless energy. Shots are packed with background action and extras. The camera moves almost constantly. And when it's static, the episode's characters certainly aren't. As Patrick prepares for his sister's wedding, Dom organizes his peri-peri pop-up and Agustin readies for his long-foreshadowed reckoning, their anxiety spills into the screen. After a deliberately slow first half, "Looking" has been on a kind of free-fall to next Sunday's season finale - which , thankfully, will not be the end of the series.
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SPORTS
By Phil Rogers | October 18, 2010
PHILADELPHIA — Nolan Ryan once found himself on a game show with the legendary Satchel Paige. The two killed time talking baseball, and for Ryan it was another chapter in his hardball education. Paige asked Ryan at one point if he knew the best pitch in baseball, and the self-conscious Ryan didn't want to embarrass himself. He said he wasn't sure. "Bow tie," Paige told him. "I never heard of it, Satch," Ryan said. "What kind of pitch is that?" "That's when you throw a fastball right here," Paige answered, running his hand across his Adam's apple, and smiling wickedly.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
We begin Anno Domini 2014 with a momentous announcement at The New York Times : Nicholas Kristof has dropped the middle initial from his byline .  Please remain calm. Do not panic. Remain in your seats.  Mr. Kristof is at some pains to explain that the middle initial, once a mark of gravitas, has come to look too formal, a barrier to the audience. (Neckwear is also apparently a barrier; he announces as well that he has forgone neckties and now wears open-collar shirts to the office.)
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. - Inauguration night is a fabulous time when the Who's Who of Washington put on their ballroom best and dance the night away, all gussied-up and fussed-over, looking good, smelling sweet and feeling hopeful. But before the Who's Who can shake and shimmy their way into the bright future that lies ahead, many find they have something else to get right first: That darn bow tie. "I only wear a bow tie once every four years," says Michael Brown, a Bush appointee at the Environmental Protection Agency, who was on his way to the Independence Ball, but needed Nordstrom's menswear clothing manager Jack Eggleston to help him with his patterned bow tie. "I just haven't mastered how to tie one."
FEATURES
By Lois Fenton | August 5, 1992
Q: I hate button-down collars. They're too Ivy League and casual for my taste. Spread collars are not high on my list, either. Of course, I'm familiar with the basic point collar shirts, because they're about all I wear. But what is this new long, narrow collar I've been seeing in the magazines? Is this considered acceptable?A: The point collar style you describe began in Hollywood with the well-dressed matinee idols of the 1930s. It has had a recent revival. The shirt has long, soft points (with no collar stays)
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | June 18, 2006
Everything was in the pink at The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore for Zoomerang 2006. Pink, as in this year's theme of pink flamingos. Pink, as in the bow tie on a penguin standing outside the zoo entrance. Pink, as in the suggested attire for the hundreds of human guests, as well. Gala co-chairs Sarah Davison and Joanna Golden set the tone in pink gowns, while co-chair Mark Davison sported a pink bow tie with his tuxedo. Fenwick Financial president Ann Fenwick floated in on a cloud of blush chiffon.
FEATURES
By Lois Fenton | December 12, 1991
Q Now that it's holiday time, I have two black-tie occasions coming up. A couple of points I'm not sure about: l) Do the pleats on a cummerbund face up or down? 2) Is my formal shirt with straight collar points correct or is the new wing collar the new style? 3) Do the bow tie and pocket square have to match?A: The pleats on a cummerbund face up. Legend has it that this was to catch crumbs at dinner. A more likely reason was to serve as a small pocket to hold one's opera tickets.Your formal pleated shirt with a standard turned-down collar is perfectly correct for black tie. In fact, it is more traditionally correct than the wing collar -- rightly reserved for white-tie-and-tails occasions.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
A few years back, a copy editor from The Sun  who was attending a conference of the American Copy Editors Society was approached at the bar by an editor from another paper who asked, "Does McIntyre really wear a bow tie to the office?"  The answer was yes.  Wearing a suit and tie, particularly a bow tie, to work is increasingly anomalous in our studiedly informal workplaces, where men either dress like adolescent boys or adopt the neither-fish-nor-fowl "business casual.
FEATURES
By Lisa Lytle and Lisa Lytle,Orange County Register | December 29, 1994
Marlene Dietrich knew a good thing when she wore one. With all her femininity, the Blue Angel turned a man's tuxedo into hers.In the decades that followed Dietrich's foray into cross-dressing for film, the tuxedo moved from the male wardrobe into the unisex arena. Like jeans, silk shirts, briefs, loafers and kilts, this 11 staple of black-tie dressing has been appropriated and personalized by both sexes.So although the old black cummerbund and bow tie remain proper, they're usually perfectly boring.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
A few years back, a copy editor from The Sun  who was attending a conference of the American Copy Editors Society was approached at the bar by an editor from another paper who asked, "Does McIntyre really wear a bow tie to the office?"  The answer was yes.  Wearing a suit and tie, particularly a bow tie, to work is increasingly anomalous in our studiedly informal workplaces, where men either dress like adolescent boys or adopt the neither-fish-nor-fowl "business casual.
ENTERTAINMENT
By L'Oreal Thompson | September 27, 2012
This week on "Glee" it's all about makeovers. At the beginning of the episode, Blaine professes this is his year and I couldn't be happier. It's about time we get more Blaine. So he signs up for every school club imaginable while singing "Everybody Wants to Rule the World" and even signs up to run against Brittany for school president. Seriously, more guys should wear bow ties. I'm going to start a petition. Across the country, Kurt has an internship interview at Vogue.com. Senior editor Isabelle Wright aka " Vogue's rogue," played by Sarah Jessica Parker, interviews Kurt.
SPORTS
By Phil Rogers | October 18, 2010
PHILADELPHIA — Nolan Ryan once found himself on a game show with the legendary Satchel Paige. The two killed time talking baseball, and for Ryan it was another chapter in his hardball education. Paige asked Ryan at one point if he knew the best pitch in baseball, and the self-conscious Ryan didn't want to embarrass himself. He said he wasn't sure. "Bow tie," Paige told him. "I never heard of it, Satch," Ryan said. "What kind of pitch is that?" "That's when you throw a fastball right here," Paige answered, running his hand across his Adam's apple, and smiling wickedly.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | May 1, 2009
Someone walked off with my dictionary. Rather, my dictionary walked off, not quite of its own accord, but on its own two feet, carrying the contents of a desk and sporting a black fedora. It was not an ordinary dictionary. It was not, to use one of the dictionary's least favorite cliches, your father's dictionary. It was your great-grandfather's dictionary, one partial to fountain pens, bow ties and - the most charming anachronism yet - the proper use of the English language. Baltimore Sun copy desk director John McIntyre was laid off this week after 23 years at the paper.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | June 18, 2006
Everything was in the pink at The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore for Zoomerang 2006. Pink, as in this year's theme of pink flamingos. Pink, as in the bow tie on a penguin standing outside the zoo entrance. Pink, as in the suggested attire for the hundreds of human guests, as well. Gala co-chairs Sarah Davison and Joanna Golden set the tone in pink gowns, while co-chair Mark Davison sported a pink bow tie with his tuxedo. Fenwick Financial president Ann Fenwick floated in on a cloud of blush chiffon.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. - Inauguration night is a fabulous time when the Who's Who of Washington put on their ballroom best and dance the night away, all gussied-up and fussed-over, looking good, smelling sweet and feeling hopeful. But before the Who's Who can shake and shimmy their way into the bright future that lies ahead, many find they have something else to get right first: That darn bow tie. "I only wear a bow tie once every four years," says Michael Brown, a Bush appointee at the Environmental Protection Agency, who was on his way to the Independence Ball, but needed Nordstrom's menswear clothing manager Jack Eggleston to help him with his patterned bow tie. "I just haven't mastered how to tie one."
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 21, 1991
Letters, calls and the roar of the crowd:Michael L. Brady, Baltimore: I couldn't believe the article you wrote in the paper regarding the deer, chickens, and other animals planning their retaliation against man. Are you for real?Here we are on the brink of war, living in a recession, with real problems existing in the world and you come up with some insane article that I'm sorry I even wasted my time reading.It's because of slop such as yours that I'm not a subscriber to the Sunpapers and probably never will be.Consider yourself lucky to even be paid to write such useless and tasteless trash.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
We begin Anno Domini 2014 with a momentous announcement at The New York Times : Nicholas Kristof has dropped the middle initial from his byline .  Please remain calm. Do not panic. Remain in your seats.  Mr. Kristof is at some pains to explain that the middle initial, once a mark of gravitas, has come to look too formal, a barrier to the audience. (Neckwear is also apparently a barrier; he announces as well that he has forgone neckties and now wears open-collar shirts to the office.)
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm | December 16, 2003
WE THE people just lost one of the good guys. Paul Simon, the Illinois Democrat who always wore a bow tie and a smile, served in the state legislature and then spent 22 consecutive years in Congress - 10 in the House, 12 in the Senate. He died last week at age 75 after undergoing heart surgery and endorsing former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean for president from his hospital bed. Mr. Simon ran for president in 1988. He also sat on the Senate Judiciary Committee that heard the riveting testimony of Clarence Thomas and his accuser, Anita Hill, during Supreme Court confirmation hearings in 1991.
NEWS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2001
Bring on spring! It's the battle cry of parents everywhere, and not because of the weather or blooming daffodils. Sure, those are nice features of the season, but for parents used to seeing their children in T-shirts, jeans and a layer of grime, spring means something more. It signals the coming of Easter, and that means finally getting kids to trade in casual clothes for some dressy new duds. "New clothes signify a new beginning," says Rosemary Schneider, who with her mother owns Pied Piper, a children's clothing store in Cross Keys.
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