Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBoutros
IN THE NEWS

Boutros

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 7, 1992
O.C. would be a great town if it weren't for the ocean, which keeps tearing it down.Don is prepared to pare, trim or gut services -- depending on what you want to pay.The latest dispute at the United Nations is whether to spell it Butros or Boutros.Just when the Russians are getting freedom, Singapore bans chewing gum.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Melanie Lefkowitz and Melanie Lefkowitz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 3, 2003
NEW YORK - It was an only-in-New-York cast: the absent-minded art expert, the homeless man roaming the subways and the hardworking immigrant who sells his wares on a Broadway curb. All three had starring roles in the safe return of two precious artworks that found their way to a Manhattan police station yesterday morning after changing a highly unusual series of hands. So, the Hitchcock movie that began in the sweat-drenched, heart-pounding, slow-motion moment William H. Bailey realized he'd left a portfolio of art worth thousands of dollars on a West 79th Street subway platform ended, happily, with Disney cheer.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 2, 1993
Bosnian peace talks in GENEVA collapsed after it had appeared the three sides were near agreement to divide Bosnia into ethnic zones.United Nations Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali met NATO chief Manfred Woerner in GENEVA and discussed how to enforce any Bosnian peace deal.Croats and Muslims seemed to be holding their fire in MOSTAR in line with their 48-hour truce. But battles between them flared in central Bosnia. Fighting was especially intense in GORNJI VAKUF.Serbia's main opposition leader denounced in BELGRADE the proposed peace accord,calling it "legalization of ethnic cleansing and genocide."
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 29, 1996
NEW YORK -- When Boutros Boutros-Ghali became secretary-general of the United Nations five years ago, he appointed Richard L. Thornburgh, the former Pennsylvania governor and U.S. attorney general, as his deputy and assigned him to cut waste and root out corruption.Thornburgh spent a year as undersecretary-general. He drafted a report calling for several management reforms, particularly the creation of an inspector general to control and investigate how money was spent.But the calls went unheeded.
NEWS
By Melanie Lefkowitz and Melanie Lefkowitz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 3, 2003
NEW YORK - It was an only-in-New-York cast: the absent-minded art expert, the homeless man roaming the subways and the hardworking immigrant who sells his wares on a Broadway curb. All three had starring roles in the safe return of two precious artworks that found their way to a Manhattan police station yesterday morning after changing a highly unusual series of hands. So, the Hitchcock movie that began in the sweat-drenched, heart-pounding, slow-motion moment William H. Bailey realized he'd left a portfolio of art worth thousands of dollars on a West 79th Street subway platform ended, happily, with Disney cheer.
NEWS
August 4, 1993
Stung by taunts it has been indecisive and timid in reacting to the Bosnian conflict, the Clinton administration has muscled its NATO allies into authorizing air strikes to end the "strangulation" of Sarajevo and to ensure the delivery of relief supplies to that stricken city. Important decisions still have to be made about where United Nations authority ends and NATO's begins if continued Serbian aggression requires actual use of air power.U.N. Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali has contended "it is his responsibility to initiate, in consultation with the Security Council, actions of this type."
NEWS
By Newsday | September 23, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- Weary of continual skirmishes in which U.N. peacekeepers and Somalis have died, the U.N. Security Council says it plans to spend millions of dollars re-establishing Somalia's justice system and expects to end the international mission there by March 1995.A State Department official in Washington said the United States and the United Nations want the world to know they are doing more than just trying to capture fugitive warlord Gen. Mohamed Farah Aidid."This resolution is to highlight the fact that the U.N. isn't simply this Aidid mission, that it does have wider goals and that we don't plan to be there forever," said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | December 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In a final flourish to his performance as commander-in-chief, President Bush will spend New Year's Eve in Somalia with the U.S. troops he sent to rescue the starving victims of tribal warfare there, it was announced yesterday.Mr. Bush, who has less than a month left in his term, is apparently trying to re-create one of the most poignant experiences of his presidency: his visit on Thanksgiving Day, 1990, to the American forces waiting in the sands of Saudi Arabia for the onset of the Persian Gulf war.The brief Somalia trip is intended to "demonstrate our concern for the people of Somalia, our commitment to humanitarian assistance, and our support for American and United Nations forces," according to a statement released by White House press secretary Marlin Fitzwater.
NEWS
By JEANE KIRKPATRICK | September 1, 1993
"What is our purpose?'' Senate Minority Leader Robert Dole asked of the latest U.S. commitment of troops to Somalia. ''What is the cost? How long will they stay?''U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali addresses these questions in his most recent report to the Security Council on Somalia. But his answers would not please Mr. Dole or a growing number of senators and representatives concerned about the increasing U.S. commitment to the U.N. operation in Somalia.Mr. Boutros-Ghali explains that what began as an effort to prevent mass starvation has become a campaign ''to reconstruct [Somalia's]
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | September 14, 1996
HAVE PITY ON countries that must deal with this one in an election year. They put up with U.S. policy-making that sees foreign policy only as domestic voting issues, for one whole year in every four.President Clinton's domestic policy gestures are widely seen as savvy if cynical election ploys, to be corrected after election if necessary. His signature on the welfare-reform bill is typical.But his foreign policy is equally prioritized by the departed Dick Morris. It isn't what's right, but what will take away the opportunity for Republicans to attack.
NEWS
November 25, 1996
NOW THAT the U.S. has used up precious political capital vetoing a second term for United Nations Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, it should stick to its guns. That means resisting blandishments and arm-twisting to back down.Instead, the United States should expand its rationale for this unpopular deed by crusading to change the tradition that secretaries-general serve two five-year terms. Where was it written in stone that Mr. Boutros-Ghali, 74, had to serve 10 years beginning in 1992?
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | November 23, 1996
THE CHATTER after the election was that President Clinton, frustrated domestically by a Republican Congress and lame-duck status, would seek his reputation in history as a foreign-policy president in the second term, the opposite of his posture upon assuming office.You can see it starting at his APEC meeting in the Philippines.But the sad truth is that he is presiding over the collapse of U.S. influence in the world. Our closest allies bitterly denounce his government. The Third World gangs up against him. The pope defies his policy.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | September 14, 1996
HAVE PITY ON countries that must deal with this one in an election year. They put up with U.S. policy-making that sees foreign policy only as domestic voting issues, for one whole year in every four.President Clinton's domestic policy gestures are widely seen as savvy if cynical election ploys, to be corrected after election if necessary. His signature on the welfare-reform bill is typical.But his foreign policy is equally prioritized by the departed Dick Morris. It isn't what's right, but what will take away the opportunity for Republicans to attack.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 25, 1996
UNITED NATIONS -- An international women's organization based in New York is opening a campaign in 75 countries this weekend to get a woman elected secretary-general of the United Nations.The organization, Equality Now, has selected six candidates from what it says is a pool of "many qualified women around the world."The organization is circulating fliers to its 2,000 affiliated groups worldwide, with pictures of the candidates and the names and addresses of the Security Council delegates who must decide by the end of the year whether Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali will have another term.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- For some reason, Boutros Boutros-Ghali just doesn't get it.If the biggest contributor to your paycheck -- and a superpower at that -- wanted you fired, you'd most likely accept the world's praise for distinguished service and retire quietly.But the United Nations secretary-general, 73, refuses to hang up his pinstripes. A bureaucratic survivor with what one colleague calls "the skin of a turtle," he treats the threat to veto his re-election as just a transitory whim."He is confident he can serve the international community for a second term," said a spokesman, Ahmad Fawzi.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | July 2, 1996
PHILADELPHIA -- Would someone please explain why the Clinton administration has launched a messy public campaign to oust United Nations Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali?The whole business is rather ugly. Last month, Secretary of State Warren Christopher said publicly that Washington will veto a second five years for Mr. Boutros-Ghali, whose tenure expires at the end of this year. Mr. Boutros-Ghali says he will run anyway.Most member states, including U.S. allies, are furious that deadbeat America -- $1.2 billion in arrears in its U.N. dues -- has acted so high-handedly.
NEWS
September 23, 1992
United States attitudes toward the United Nations have changed from the suspicion of its leftist, Third World tilt during the Reagan years to current enthusiasm for its usefulness in solving international dilemmas. But U.S. policy has not caught up with U.S. rhetoric. Either the world body is not as useful as the administration says, or the U.S. is not supporting it sufficiently. 00 Choose one.President Bush did not choose, however, in his annual address to the United Nations General Assembly on Monday.
NEWS
June 23, 1996
PRESIDENT CLINTON, in another move to co-opt a Republican issue, has vowed to block United Nations Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali from another five-year term. His White House spokesman, Mike McCurry, describes the U.N. headquarters in New York as a building "stuffed with too many bureaucrats and stuffed with too much waste and inefficiency." Bob Dole, a constant critic of the 73-year-old Egyptian statesman, will have a tough time topping such undiplomatic language.Politics aside, the president is fully justified in taking this action.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 20, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration has decided not to support Boutros Boutros-Ghali for a second term as United Nations secretary-general and has informed him that Washington will use its veto, if necessary, to prevent his re-election, senior U.S. officials said yesterday.The United States, which considers Boutros-Ghali an obstacle to reform at the international organization, has begun the process of informing other countries, including other Security Council members, the officials said, describing the decision as "irrevocable."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.