Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBouquet Garni
IN THE NEWS

Bouquet Garni

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,Knight Ridder News Service | April 5, 1992
A warm and inviting stew is usually not on a list of quick and easy dinners. Sauteed veal with leeks, however, is simple, delicious and will take just minutes to prepare.Stew veal is usually sold already cut into cubes. Try to buy cubes that are about 1 inch square and don't have a lot of gristle. These will cook more evenly and remain juicier than smaller pieces. The dish freezes very well; if you have time, double the recipe and save half for an emergency dinner.The recipe calls for a bouquet garni, a bundle of fresh herbs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,Sun reporter | November 22, 2006
Goose Fat & Garlic: Country Recipes From Southwest France By Jeanne Strang The Bistros, Brasseries, and Wine Bars of Paris By Daniel Young William Morrow / 2006 / $24.95 Having struggled with country French, I feared Parisian cuisine would completely elude me. But Daniel Young's book was perfectly accessible. Recipes for even the most citified fare are straightforward. The ingredients are, by and large, available in ordinary American supermarkets. The dishes don't all scream Paris.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,Sun reporter | November 22, 2006
Goose Fat & Garlic: Country Recipes From Southwest France By Jeanne Strang The Bistros, Brasseries, and Wine Bars of Paris By Daniel Young William Morrow / 2006 / $24.95 Having struggled with country French, I feared Parisian cuisine would completely elude me. But Daniel Young's book was perfectly accessible. Recipes for even the most citified fare are straightforward. The ingredients are, by and large, available in ordinary American supermarkets. The dishes don't all scream Paris.
NEWS
By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS and ROBIN MATHER JENKINS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 3, 2006
Baby artichokes aren't immature globe artichokes; they're just smaller artichokes that grow nearer the ground instead of at the very top of the plant. They range from walnut- to egg-sized. They lack the thistlelike "choke" nestled in the tender heart near the base. Otherwise, they are just the same as larger artichokes. Baby artichokes are wholly edible once trimmed and cooked, and don't need as much trimming as their larger counterparts. Some people like to cut medium and large baby artichokes into halves or quarters.
FEATURES
By Waltrina Stovall | September 25, 1991
The women's magazines at the supermarket counter always seem to be trumpeting a plan for putting dinner on the table in 30 minutes or less. But when I've had a hard day, I like to make something that takes a long time to cook.It only sounds contradictory."Quick meals," for the most part, require that you attack the kitchen with the sort of zeal and efficiency that would impress a time-and-motion expert.A slow-cooked dish -- particularly a braised one -- gives you a chance to unwind. After you've started it, you can have a drink, read your mail or a book, watch TV or telephone a friend.
NEWS
By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS and ROBIN MATHER JENKINS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 3, 2006
Baby artichokes aren't immature globe artichokes; they're just smaller artichokes that grow nearer the ground instead of at the very top of the plant. They range from walnut- to egg-sized. They lack the thistlelike "choke" nestled in the tender heart near the base. Otherwise, they are just the same as larger artichokes. Baby artichokes are wholly edible once trimmed and cooked, and don't need as much trimming as their larger counterparts. Some people like to cut medium and large baby artichokes into halves or quarters.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | April 13, 1994
Q: I often see overripe bananas on sale at the grocery store What is the best way to keep them if I don't want to use them right away?A: The best way to preserve overripe bananas a few more days is to refrigerate them. The skin will turn dark and they will not be firm, but they will be fine for baking. Make sure other items in your refrigerator are well-sealed and keep the bananas in a fruit ,, drawer otherwise the banana flavor will take over your fridge.Q: When making chicken soup, should you remove all the hardened fat on the top after you refrigerate it?
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | March 11, 1992
Fragrant fennel is often said, unfairly, to taste like licorice. In fact the taste is light and delicate, elusive rather than persistent, and a perfect complement to salads, soups and stews.Fennel is closely associated with Italian cuisine and, according to Elizabeth Schneider's "Uncommon Fruits & Vegetables, A Commonsense Guide," ancient Romans used fennel to season pork, lamb, seafood and beans. Modern Italians still make a fennel and pork sausage. Fennel is available from early fall through late spring.
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1997
Ten days ago, I didn't know much about football. I didn't know that offense sells tickets and defense wins championships. I didn't know that the tight end is both a blocker and a receiver. I didn't know that Scallops Parisian is a rich blend of scallops in a cream sauce with shallots, mushrooms and bouquet garni.Now, thanks to the National Football League, I know all of this. At least, I think I do. To be honest, I'm still not sure what bouquet garni is. But as former New York Jet Ken Schroy told me during Football 101, a clinic for women at the Meadowlands in New Jersey:"Football is life.
FEATURES
By Susan Herrmann Loomis and Susan Herrmann Loomis,EATING WELL United Feature Syndicate | December 24, 1995
When Germaine Ginies Grandjean talks of preparing for Christmas Eve supper, her eyes sparkle. She describes the ritual of soaking salt cod, the sound of leeks sizzling on the wood stove and the warm aroma of the golden fruit tart as it emerges from the ancient bread oven.With more than 80 years of practice, Mme. Grandjean knows these rituals well. She and her family have always lived in the tiny village of Reilhanette, 20 miles east of Vaisons-la-Romaine. Here in rural Provence, the Christmas Eve feast is a mystical blend of Christianity and folklore.
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1997
Ten days ago, I didn't know much about football. I didn't know that offense sells tickets and defense wins championships. I didn't know that the tight end is both a blocker and a receiver. I didn't know that Scallops Parisian is a rich blend of scallops in a cream sauce with shallots, mushrooms and bouquet garni.Now, thanks to the National Football League, I know all of this. At least, I think I do. To be honest, I'm still not sure what bouquet garni is. But as former New York Jet Ken Schroy told me during Football 101, a clinic for women at the Meadowlands in New Jersey:"Football is life.
FEATURES
By Susan Herrmann Loomis and Susan Herrmann Loomis,EATING WELL United Feature Syndicate | December 24, 1995
When Germaine Ginies Grandjean talks of preparing for Christmas Eve supper, her eyes sparkle. She describes the ritual of soaking salt cod, the sound of leeks sizzling on the wood stove and the warm aroma of the golden fruit tart as it emerges from the ancient bread oven.With more than 80 years of practice, Mme. Grandjean knows these rituals well. She and her family have always lived in the tiny village of Reilhanette, 20 miles east of Vaisons-la-Romaine. Here in rural Provence, the Christmas Eve feast is a mystical blend of Christianity and folklore.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | April 13, 1994
Q: I often see overripe bananas on sale at the grocery store What is the best way to keep them if I don't want to use them right away?A: The best way to preserve overripe bananas a few more days is to refrigerate them. The skin will turn dark and they will not be firm, but they will be fine for baking. Make sure other items in your refrigerator are well-sealed and keep the bananas in a fruit ,, drawer otherwise the banana flavor will take over your fridge.Q: When making chicken soup, should you remove all the hardened fat on the top after you refrigerate it?
FEATURES
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,Knight Ridder News Service | April 5, 1992
A warm and inviting stew is usually not on a list of quick and easy dinners. Sauteed veal with leeks, however, is simple, delicious and will take just minutes to prepare.Stew veal is usually sold already cut into cubes. Try to buy cubes that are about 1 inch square and don't have a lot of gristle. These will cook more evenly and remain juicier than smaller pieces. The dish freezes very well; if you have time, double the recipe and save half for an emergency dinner.The recipe calls for a bouquet garni, a bundle of fresh herbs.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | March 11, 1992
Fragrant fennel is often said, unfairly, to taste like licorice. In fact the taste is light and delicate, elusive rather than persistent, and a perfect complement to salads, soups and stews.Fennel is closely associated with Italian cuisine and, according to Elizabeth Schneider's "Uncommon Fruits & Vegetables, A Commonsense Guide," ancient Romans used fennel to season pork, lamb, seafood and beans. Modern Italians still make a fennel and pork sausage. Fennel is available from early fall through late spring.
FEATURES
By Waltrina Stovall | September 25, 1991
The women's magazines at the supermarket counter always seem to be trumpeting a plan for putting dinner on the table in 30 minutes or less. But when I've had a hard day, I like to make something that takes a long time to cook.It only sounds contradictory."Quick meals," for the most part, require that you attack the kitchen with the sort of zeal and efficiency that would impress a time-and-motion expert.A slow-cooked dish -- particularly a braised one -- gives you a chance to unwind. After you've started it, you can have a drink, read your mail or a book, watch TV or telephone a friend.
FEATURES
By Steven Raichlen | September 22, 1991
Clam chowder is probably the nation's most famous chowder. It is traditionally made with quahogs -- large hard-shell clams -- but one could easily use littlenecks or cherrystones. The chowder below has two twists: bacon is added in addition to salt pork and fried julienned leeks are used as a garnish. The recipe comes from Ris Lacoste, chef at 21 Federal St. in Washington.White clam chowder with leeksServes 12.24 quahogs (3 cups clam meat and liquor)3 cups dry white wineapproximately 2 cups fish stock, clam broth, or water6 leeks, trimmed and washed2 onions4 stalks celery3 ounces salt pork6 strips of bacon1/3 cup flour3 large potatoes, peeled and dicedbouquet garni of bay leaf, thyme, and parsleysalt, pepper, and cayenne pepper2 cups peanut oil for frying the leeks1 cup heavy cream4 tablespoons finely chopped chives or parsley3 tablespoons butterScrub the quahogs and place them in a large, covered pot with the wine.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.