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Botulinum Toxin

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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 15, 1990
WASHINGTON -- A federal advisory panel recommended yesterday the expanded use of botulinum toxin for certain muscle spasm disorders, saying that injections of minute amounts of the lethal substance can be a safe and effective therapy for hundreds of thousands of Americans."
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 19, 2013
Cosmetic surgery is on the rise, led by people getting chemical peels, laser hair removal and other minimally-invasive procedures, according to a report released Tuesday by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Plastic surgery procedures increased 5 percent in 2012 with doctors performing 14.6 million procedures. Minimally invasive procedures increased 6 percent and surgical procedures declined 2 percent. The top minimally invasive procedures were:   •     Botulinum toxin type A (6.1 million procedures, up 8 percent)
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 9, 2003
WASHINGTON - The U.S. military is ill prepared to defend its troops against a lethal toxin that is thought to be part of Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein's biological arsenal, a top military officer said yesterday. Col. Erik Henchal, commander of the U.S. Army's Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, at Fort Detrick, Md., told reporters that the Pentagon has few vaccines or treatments for botulinum toxin, a deadly poison that Hussein, after the 1991 Persian Gulf war, admitted making by the thousands of gallons and placing in warheads.
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,Los Angeles Times | October 5, 2003
Botox was just the beginning. The popularity of the injectable toxin seemed to prove that people wanted wrinkle cures without surgery. So as hundreds of thousands of Americans rushed to get the muscle-paralyzing treatment -- even those who had never sought cosmetic procedures -- plastic surgeons and drug manufacturers were working to come up with other simple tricks to smooth aging skin. And they seem to have succeeded. A new generation of injectable substances -- used to treat facial lines, scars and depressions -- has begun hitting the market.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | November 8, 1994
Q: Three years ago, at age 63, I developed a mild shaking of my hands that has gotten slowly worse. No other symptoms have occurred, but I am concerned because a shaking hand was the first symptom of Parkinson's disease in a friend. Is it likely that I have or will get Parkinson's disease? Although the shaking is only mildly troublesome, I wonder whether there is any effective treatment.A: It is impossible to know whether you have Parkinson's disease without further information. There is a good chance, however, that you have a far less dangerous disorder called essential tremor.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 19, 2013
Cosmetic surgery is on the rise, led by people getting chemical peels, laser hair removal and other minimally-invasive procedures, according to a report released Tuesday by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Plastic surgery procedures increased 5 percent in 2012 with doctors performing 14.6 million procedures. Minimally invasive procedures increased 6 percent and surgical procedures declined 2 percent. The top minimally invasive procedures were:   •     Botulinum toxin type A (6.1 million procedures, up 8 percent)
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
Luretta Purse never imagined the answer to a throat condition that caused her to shed 52 pounds and constantly pine for food would be one of the world's most potent toxins -- the kind associated with botulism poisoning.Nor, given the life-altering benefits of the treatments, does she care. "It's been a miracle -- I can eat!" Mrs. Purse, of Seaford, Del., said yesterday at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.Mrs. Purse wasn't about to temper her enthusiasm for the treatment that relieved a rare swallowing disorder called acalasia, which caused food to back up in her esophagus rather than drop into her stomach.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1998
COLLEGE PARK -- Raymond A. Zilinskas vividly recalls that hot June morning when he sat in a school bus loaded with chemists and biologists as they rolled down a desolate highway, through the sandy wasteland west of Baghdad."
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,Los Angeles Times | October 5, 2003
Botox was just the beginning. The popularity of the injectable toxin seemed to prove that people wanted wrinkle cures without surgery. So as hundreds of thousands of Americans rushed to get the muscle-paralyzing treatment -- even those who had never sought cosmetic procedures -- plastic surgeons and drug manufacturers were working to come up with other simple tricks to smooth aging skin. And they seem to have succeeded. A new generation of injectable substances -- used to treat facial lines, scars and depressions -- has begun hitting the market.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2002
A scheduled "Botox Night" at Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center, at which attendees learn how a purified strain of botulism can combat wrinkles, has drawn criticism from a consumer advocacy group that says the event is an example of "crass commercialism" and undermines the educational mission of the university. Comparing the event to Botox parties, which gained popularity after the Food and Drug Administration approved botulinum toxin to treat frown lines in April, the Washington-based Public Citizen Health Research Group urged the medical center to cancel the event, scheduled to take place tomorrow night at Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 9, 2003
WASHINGTON - The U.S. military is ill prepared to defend its troops against a lethal toxin that is thought to be part of Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein's biological arsenal, a top military officer said yesterday. Col. Erik Henchal, commander of the U.S. Army's Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, at Fort Detrick, Md., told reporters that the Pentagon has few vaccines or treatments for botulinum toxin, a deadly poison that Hussein, after the 1991 Persian Gulf war, admitted making by the thousands of gallons and placing in warheads.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1998
COLLEGE PARK -- Raymond A. Zilinskas vividly recalls that hot June morning when he sat in a school bus loaded with chemists and biologists as they rolled down a desolate highway, through the sandy wasteland west of Baghdad."
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | November 8, 1994
Q: Three years ago, at age 63, I developed a mild shaking of my hands that has gotten slowly worse. No other symptoms have occurred, but I am concerned because a shaking hand was the first symptom of Parkinson's disease in a friend. Is it likely that I have or will get Parkinson's disease? Although the shaking is only mildly troublesome, I wonder whether there is any effective treatment.A: It is impossible to know whether you have Parkinson's disease without further information. There is a good chance, however, that you have a far less dangerous disorder called essential tremor.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
Luretta Purse never imagined the answer to a throat condition that caused her to shed 52 pounds and constantly pine for food would be one of the world's most potent toxins -- the kind associated with botulism poisoning.Nor, given the life-altering benefits of the treatments, does she care. "It's been a miracle -- I can eat!" Mrs. Purse, of Seaford, Del., said yesterday at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.Mrs. Purse wasn't about to temper her enthusiasm for the treatment that relieved a rare swallowing disorder called acalasia, which caused food to back up in her esophagus rather than drop into her stomach.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 15, 1990
WASHINGTON -- A federal advisory panel recommended yesterday the expanded use of botulinum toxin for certain muscle spasm disorders, saying that injections of minute amounts of the lethal substance can be a safe and effective therapy for hundreds of thousands of Americans."
NEWS
May 4, 2005
Bob Hunter, 63, a Canadian who co-founded Greenpeace and used his experience as a journalist to turn the environmental group's fight to an international cause, died Monday in Toronto of prostate cancer, the organization said. Mr. Hunter, a columnist for the Vancouver Sun in the 1960s and most recently an ecology broadcaster for Canadian news media, first came to prominence in 1971 with the launch of Greenpeace and its protests against nuclear testing. He brought public attention to the hunting of whales and seals, as well as the dumping of toxic waste into the oceans.
NEWS
November 1, 2001
State health authorities said yesterday they are working with federal disease experts to investigate a Maryland botulism case. Officials said that a patient was hospitalized, but provided no other details of the case. Botulism is a dangerous bacterial infection that can occur in the digestive tract, lungs or through broken skin. About 100 cases occur annually in the United States, according to Dr. John G. Bartlett, chief of infectious diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School, of Medicine.
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