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Bottling Plant

NEWS
February 7, 2000
AS MAYOR Martin O'Malley begins to implement his administration's new initiatives, he should think about getting rid of the traditional definition of downtown. Why is this important? Because the traditional downtown should take advantage of developments occurring just outside its borders in such places as: Inner Harbor East, south of Little Italy, where a 31-story hotel, is rising next to a complex that will include another inn, movie theaters, shops and apartments. Locust Point, where the old Procter & Gamble plant is being transformed into 360,000 square feet of office space with dramatic Inner Harbor views.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2006
Hoping to set the stage for the future renewal of one of the city's most distressed areas, officials are moving to acquire about 200 abandoned properties around the historic American Brewery building in a long-neglected corner of East Baltimore. The 30-odd properties closest to the brewery - which has been vacant for more than three decades but is slated to be renovated as the local headquarters of a nonprofit social services agency - will be shored up to prevent further deterioration, while the rest will be held until the city decides what to do with them.
NEWS
December 27, 2009
Your recent editorial "It's Miller Time?" (Dec. 18) severely misrepresented the impact that raising the tax on beverage alcohol will have on the state of Maryland and its hospitality industry. As a Maryland resident and employee of Diageo, which employs more than 300 Maryland residents at our local bottling plant in Relay, I'm concerned that you are downplaying the potential damage of this tax. It's the hardworking citizens - like those who work on our bottling line - who will bear the brunt of this tax. Raising taxes on consumer products always means job losses.
NEWS
October 12, 1992
No single development could break the economic gloom that has settled over the state in recent years.But at least a break in the clouds seems to be promised by reports that Coca-Cola Enterprises plans to build a massive, state-of-the-art manufacturing and bottling plant in Howard County.Mark Wasserman, the head of the state's Department of Economic and Employment Development, beams, "This is really a ray of sunshine, after a long, rainy day" of bad economic news."Howard County leaders, too, are glowing because the $100 million, 650,000-square-foot plant will generate an estimated $4 million a year in local property taxes.
NEWS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,Staff Writer | August 30, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Two Westminster men moved a step closer to building an indoor sports arena here after getting approval from the Carroll County Board of Zoning Appeals Wednesday.The approved site is located at 525 Old Westminster Pike -- about 800 feet from the intersection of East Main Street and Malcolm Drive behind the former Coca-Cola bottling plant.Emerson Bair, who purchased the property under contract contingent upon approval of the appeal, and Jim Shank, who will lease and operate the facility, will now seek site plan approval from the county.
NEWS
August 23, 1994
When weighing the two choices for the Democratic nominee for Howard County executive, consider the position that candidate Susan Gray took on the now-delayed $200 million Coca-Cola bottling plant proposed for Howard County.Ms. Gray, a self-described "slow growth" advocate, says upon learning of the negotiations for the project that she would have immediately gone to the surrounding Dorsey community to inform citizens of the proposal, though that would have revealed Coke's plans prematurely and might have discouraged it from locating in the county.
NEWS
February 23, 1993
A Report Card: County Council at Mid-termHoward County Council members confront the midpoint in their four-year terms with few accomplishments of which to boast. In fact, the council is better defined by what it hasn't accomplished.From councilmanic redistricting (still pending) to the defeat of legislation designed to create more affordable housing, council members have shown no consistency in their political philosophy and direction.The comprehensive rezoning of the eastern portion of the county -- more unfinished business -- has council members locked in a bitter battle with constituents over the amount of growth the two sides will accept.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | March 19, 1993
Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc. announced yesterday that its sister company, Coca-Cola USA, has decided to join it at its new plant in Howard County -- boosting the number of anticipated workers by 250, to 750."This is a blockbuster not only for Howard County, but for all of Maryland," said Mark L. Wasserman, secretary of the state's Department of Economic and Employment Development."It's a significant victory that should give everybody heart about Maryland and its competitiveness."While the state has worked closely with the companies to streamline the process of building the plant, Maryland is not providing any financial assistance, Mr. Wasserman said.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 1, 1993
Baltimore's long-vacant American Brewery would be renovated as the centerpiece of a $10 million to $12 million revitalization project for East Baltimore under plans developed by the Council for Economic and Business Opportunity.CEBO President Michael Gaines told representatives of the Broadway East community last week that two manufacturing companies have signed letters of intent to occupy the first phase of the mixed-use complex and that he expects construction to begin soon."Shortly, that site will no longer stand as a deteriorated industrial building," he said.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 10, 1996
WACO, Texas -- They're celebrating a soft drink here at the Dr Pepper Museum and Free Enterprise Institute, a grandly named venture housed in a gussied-up 1906 bottling plant. Actually, they're celebrating the history of all soft drinks.In this yellow-brick Romanesque building ornamented with arches and turrets, Dr Pepper is memorialized as a Texas institution that went big time. Visitors see vintage Dr Pepper advertisements, photos of Russian troops knocking back bottles Dr Pepper, excerpts from a federal court case involving Dr Pepper.
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