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Bottleneck

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NEWS
August 28, 1995
It cost the state of Maryland $11 million a few years ago to smooth the flow of traffic along Interstate 95 at the John F. Kennedy Memorial Highway toll plaza at Perryville, just northeast of the Millard Tydings Bridge and the Susquehanna River. But due to a lack of cooperation from neighboring Delaware, that improvement hasn't had the desired effect.Traffic zips freely southbound and moves fairly briskly northbound through tolls at the Maryland plaza, but for a buck and a quarter just up the road in Delaware you encounter a nearly constant bottleneck -- in both directions.
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NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
In the stop-and-go world of Baltimore-area traffic, there's a lot more braking than commuters and transportation officials would like. Take Russell Allen, a Federal Hill resident who gets in his silver Ford Edge every weekday morning before 7:30 and steers south toward Fort Meade and the region's biggest bottleneck: Baltimore-Washington Parkway and Route 175. The trip starts fine. But around Route 100, Allen's windshield relfects a dazzling array of red taillights. "And it stays that way until I get to work - four miles and 20 minutes later," said Allen, 52, who works for the Army.
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NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | April 18, 1993
All things come to those who wait.Even the tollbooth on the Millard E. Tydings Memorial Bridge.After more than a half-hour of gut-wrenching, temper-boiling, anxiety-building, bumper-to-bumper, lurch-and-halt madness. On an Easter Sunday afternoon. With no place to turn around and no exit ahead, since the backup maniacally began just after the Aberdeen exit on Interstate 95. And, of course, no warning sign of the impending bottleneck. No State Police help. Just the kind of traffic foul-up that spoils holiday moods, appetites and family dinners.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
An Eastern Shore construction bottleneck has been unclogged, just in time for beach traffic. Both westbound lanes of the U.S. 50 bridge over U.S. 301 opened to traffic Friday, several weeks ahead of schedule, the Maryland State Highway Administration announced. Crews expedited work on the $2.8 million project by closing one of the two lanes late last September after the summer traffic abated. More than 44,000 vehicles on average use that stretch of U.S. 50 daily, volume that increases by 30 to 40 percent on summer weekends.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
An Eastern Shore construction bottleneck has been unclogged, just in time for beach traffic. Both westbound lanes of the U.S. 50 bridge over U.S. 301 opened to traffic Friday, several weeks ahead of schedule, the Maryland State Highway Administration announced. Crews expedited work on the $2.8 million project by closing one of the two lanes late last September after the summer traffic abated. More than 44,000 vehicles on average use that stretch of U.S. 50 daily, volume that increases by 30 to 40 percent on summer weekends.
NEWS
February 5, 1997
AN EASY FLOWING Route 32 is essential for myriad reasons, in which all three levels of government have a stake.At the county level, ending the bottleneck at Route 32 at the National Security Agency is crucial if officials hope to develop Odenton into a town center. In fact, Anne Arundel County Executive John G. Gary is willing to put up $5 million to upgrade the stretch of road that now clogs up around NSA.For most of its passage through Anne Arundel, Route 32 is a limited access, four-lane divided highway -- except near NSA. Around that major employer, the road narrows and traffic signals govern the numerous cross streets that connect the NSA campus with Fort George G. Meade.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 4, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - At least nine climbers were reported dead yesterday on K2, the world's second-highest mountain, after an avalanche struck them on a steep gully at a height of about 27,000 feet, just below the summit, mountaineering officials said. Those who died included South Koreans and Nepalese, the Pakistani television station ARY reported. Serbian, Norwegian, Dutch and French climbers were also near the summit, according to ARY. Other climbers are believed missing. The accident occurred when a chunk of an ice pillar snapped Friday, breaking fixed ropes on the area of the peak just below the summit, known as Bottleneck, according to expedition organizers.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 11, 2000
If only Gore and Bush were running for vice president. Kostunica is the man. But you wouldn't want to sell him life insurance. Israel and the Arab neighbors have not had a real war in 27 years and too many people on both sides feel cheated. Route 404 could hold the record for longest bottleneck. Cheer up. Andre Braugher is back battling God and death.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 12, 2001
The Senator Theatre marks its 62nd anniversary with a weeklong salute to the movies of 1939, the Senator's first year of operation. At 1939 admission prices - 25 cents - the series is a bargain, a delight, and it's timely, too: The eight attractions bring home the wildly different ways international filmmakers responded to war-clouds breaking over Asia and Europe. Jean Renoir reacted more dazzlingly than anyone else with his masterpiece, Rules of the Game (Monday at 1 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.)
NEWS
July 7, 1996
WHAT IS 35 years old, six lanes wide, overcrowded and crumbling? If you guessed the Woodrow Wilson Bridge across )) the Potomac River, you are right. The key question, though, is whether officials from Virginia, Maryland, the District of Columbia and the federal government can agree on a replacement span before the structure deteriorates to the point that trucks have to be barred from using it.They're inching toward a solution. Two options are alive. Neither will be cheap: A 150-foot-high 12-lane bridge ($1.6 billion)
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | March 7, 2013
It's not much of a surprise that the Maryland State Highway Administration is again looking at making I-95 wider in Harford County from the Route 24 interchange south to the Baltimore County line and beyond. The state has dozens of projects in the long-term planning phase at any given moment and, depending on the politics of the moment, any such project can be jumped to the head of the line, or bumped back. The latest series of I-95 construction projects that have included major upgrades of the Route 24, White Marsh Boulevard and Baltimore Beltway interchanges, as well as the addition of extra lanes, was a low priority early in Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s administration, then it suddenly became a high priority and construction was begun.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2011
The state set in motion Wednesday an "aggressive" $100 million renovation of BWI Marshall Airport that will streamline security check-ins, eliminate a major passenger bottleneck and give its No. 1 carrier room to grow. With minimal discussion, the state Board of Public Works unanimously approved construction money for a project that will remake the oldest part of the terminal at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport over the next two years. The project will be BWI's most ambitious undertaking since the $288 million Southwest Airlines terminal opened in 2005.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Could Delaware's infamous toll plaza bottleneck finally have been uncorked? Delaware Department of Transportation officials say they've completed a $32.6 million project — just in time for the July 4 holiday weekend — that will greatly reduce the mind-numbing toll collection backups that have made Delaware's border with Maryland the most dreaded stretch of Interstate 95 from Maine to Miami. Department spokesman Michael Williams said the opening of two new high-speed E-ZPass lanes in each direction "will result in dramatic changes in what motorists face when they transit the Newark toll plaza in Delaware.
TRAVEL
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2010
It seems that for every good route to bypass the mid-Atlantic region's worst traffic bottlenecks, there's a better one. At least, that's what Getting There readers tell me as the Thanksgiving holiday weekend looms. Last week, I suggested strategies to avoid some of the worst traffic on the busiest travel days of the year – especially Wednesday and Sunday. At the time, readers were asked to contribute their refinements to these suggestions, and they responded generously with advice – though some weren't as generous with their names.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | michael.dresser@baltsun.com | February 25, 2010
With a dubious boost from the Beltway, Baltimore continued its slow rise among the ranks of America's most congested metropolitan areas as a national survey last year ranked it the 16th-most traffic-choked. The annual INRIX National Traffic Scoreboard shows highway congestion in Baltimore, the 20th-largest metro area in population, steadily worsening since 2006, when it ranked 21st. By 2008, it was 17th. Baltimore, with a 12 percent rise, was one of only three of the nation's 30 largest cities to post an increase of more than 10 percent in congestion from 2008 to 2009.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | September 27, 2009
The Maryland Transportation Authority, inundated with requests from drivers to close E-ZPass accounts, says that the vendor administering the system has beefed up staffing and shortened the time it takes to process refunds. Account closures totaled 13,820 in July and August - or about eight times the average number of closures for a two-month period - after Maryland's E-ZPass program began charging owners of the electronic toll-collection devices a fee of $1.50 a month. Some motorists have complained that they were charged the fee as they were waiting for their accounts to be closed.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | May 26, 2006
A preliminary city plan to make neighborhoods off Bay Ridge Road more of an urban center is drawing criticism and anger from residents, who fear homes and businesses will be lost to development and traffic will get worse. The study presented to about 250 residents on Wednesday night at Georgetown East Elementary School is based on Annapolis' 1998 comprehensive plan, proposing a "mixed use center" featuring residential, retail and commercial space. Completed by a Philadelphia firm, it calls for a Main Street-like Bay Ridge Road with trees, bike lanes, on-street parking and an additional traffic light that would slow traffic to 25 mph. But residents of the Annapolis Neck, where commuters swap stories about going 3 miles in 40 minutes in rush-hour traffic, say enough is enough, and that they don't need another video store, pharmacy or supermarket.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | May 26, 2009
CHESTER - -The Cohen family thought they would beat much of the typical Memorial Day beach traffic by leaving Bethany Beach early in the day Monday. Not so much, they discovered. Sherry and Buddy Cohen, their son, daughter and a family friend, packed into their car at 11:30 a.m., but by 4:15 p.m. hadn't yet crossed the Bay Bridge. The Pikesville family joined hordes of other people who just couldn't take sitting in the car anymore and had stopped at a McDonald's a few miles from the bridge for a break.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,gettingthere@baltsun.com | February 16, 2009
Many Americans are pinning high hopes on the economic stimulus bill that President Barack Obama stampeded through Congress last week: millions of jobs, repairs to crumbling infrastructure and a defibrillator jolt to the flat-lining economy. But could Big Stim also help end the notorious backups at Delaware's Interstate 95 toll plaza? Delaware Gov. Jack Markell thinks so. The boss rooster of the Blue Hen State announced last week - in advance of the final vote on the $787 billion package - that the bill could help relieve backups at the Newark toll plaza by speeding a project to add two E-ZPass lanes in each direction.
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