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BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | January 23, 1991
For years, the people at Baltimore's Standard Cap & Molding Co. fought a losing battle against corporate giants such as the Monsanto Co. as they scrabbled to find some way to make money producing plastic bottles.But in 1969, the company gave up on dreams of soaring into success in the booming plastic-bottle business. New managers came in while the company was in bankruptcy and decided that this time, the plastics company would remain content to think small.Very small.The newly renamed Poly-Seal Corp.
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TRAVEL
Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
– In the mid-1950's Washington architect and builder Francis Koenig was advised by his doctors to escape the city and find a place to rest from the tensions of his work, so he and his wife, Ann Marie, found a retreat among the tobacco farms of Calvert County. They built a waterfront home in Long Beach, took up sailing and grew to love the area and its watermen so deeply that in 1991 they donated 30 acres on St. John's Creek to the county and asked that it be used as a sculpture garden like those they had seen in their European travels.
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FEATURES
By Donna Erickson and Donna Erickson,King Features Syndicate | July 30, 1994
Creating a puppet character out of one's imagination is play for children, whether a furry kitten or a scary monster. And when the curtains rise, the puppets can go on stage and laugh and cry or dare to do anything their creator imagines.To make a cereal box puppet, you will need: 1 single-portion cereal box, paper lining removed and open end glued shut; poster paint and brushes; markers; construction paper; glue; scissors; odds and ends (feathers, pipe cleaners, bottle caps, felt scraps, etc.)
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 2002
Danny Ginsburg's early fascination with bottle caps led him to some memorable flavor adventures. Now 37, Ginsburg fondly recalls his first taste of birch beer at a general store in upstate New York on a visit to see his grandmother. Back in Los Angeles, his hometown, sodas came in plastic bottles or aluminum cans, offering nothing like the taste and feel of drinking a good soda from a cold glass bottle on a warm summer day. Ginsburg had to wait until he had a driver's license and could drive around the countryside before he could find significant numbers of bottle caps.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 2002
Danny Ginsburg's early fascination with bottle caps led him to some memorable flavor adventures. Now 37, Ginsburg fondly recalls his first taste of birch beer at a general store in upstate New York on a visit to see his grandmother. Back in Los Angeles, his hometown, sodas came in plastic bottles or aluminum cans, offering nothing like the taste and feel of drinking a good soda from a cold glass bottle on a warm summer day. Ginsburg had to wait until he had a driver's license and could drive around the countryside before he could find significant numbers of bottle caps.
TRAVEL
Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
– In the mid-1950's Washington architect and builder Francis Koenig was advised by his doctors to escape the city and find a place to rest from the tensions of his work, so he and his wife, Ann Marie, found a retreat among the tobacco farms of Calvert County. They built a waterfront home in Long Beach, took up sailing and grew to love the area and its watermen so deeply that in 1991 they donated 30 acres on St. John's Creek to the county and asked that it be used as a sculpture garden like those they had seen in their European travels.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick | February 2, 1992
The name Crown Cork & Seal Co. Inc. may not evoke the same response from consumers as McDonald's, Coca-Cola or Ford. But millions use its products every day when they zip open cans of soft drink or beer, or pop the tops off bottled drinks.Crown Cork, founded in Baltimore 100 years ago today, is one of the world's largest makers of aluminum and steel cans, turning out billions annually. It is also the leading producer of bottle caps, which were invented by the company's founder, William Painter.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | May 30, 1995
When 11-year-old Zachary Hartley goes out, he's always looking for bottle caps.The fifth-grader at Linthicum Elementary School has a collection of nearly 400 bottle caps. They're on display at the Linthicum library, at 400 Shipley Road, through tomorrow.Some of the bottle caps look smashed, as if rolled over by a truck. Most look new and come from beer bottles. Some are from sodas. Others are from juice drinks. The rest are plain.He has picked up a few of the bottle caps poking around his Linthicum neighborhood.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 27, 1993
MANILA, Philippines -- Pepsi's advertisements, splashed for weeks all over Philippine newspapers, radio and TV, were hardly subtle: "Today, you could be a millionaire!"From her tin-roofed shack in one of Manila's more squalid slums, Victoria Angelo couldn't resist. The unemployed mother of five and her husband, Juanito, who pedals people in a three-wheeled cab for about $4 a day, began drinking Pepsi with every meal and snack. Each morning, the family prayed for a specially marked bottle cap.And then, a miracle!
NEWS
February 11, 1995
Billy Jones, 45, an original member of the 1970s country-rock group the Outlaws, died Tuesday in Spring Hill, Fla. The cause of death was not known. He joined the Outlaws in 1972 as a co-guitarist with Hugh Thomasson and Henry Paul. The band was one of the premier Southern rock acts of the 1970s, scoring hits with "There Goes Another Love Song."Ralph Kirstein Heyman, 86, a former president and chief executive of the Consolidated Cork Corp., a manufacturer of bottle caps and can manufacturing equipment, died Monday of a stroke at his home in Scarsdale, N.Y. Consolidated Cork, was based in Piscataway, N.J.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | May 30, 1995
When 11-year-old Zachary Hartley goes out, he's always looking for bottle caps.The fifth-grader at Linthicum Elementary School has a collection of nearly 400 bottle caps. They're on display at the Linthicum library, at 400 Shipley Road, through tomorrow.Some of the bottle caps look smashed, as if rolled over by a truck. Most look new and come from beer bottles. Some are from sodas. Others are from juice drinks. The rest are plain.He has picked up a few of the bottle caps poking around his Linthicum neighborhood.
FEATURES
By Donna Erickson and Donna Erickson,King Features Syndicate | July 30, 1994
Creating a puppet character out of one's imagination is play for children, whether a furry kitten or a scary monster. And when the curtains rise, the puppets can go on stage and laugh and cry or dare to do anything their creator imagines.To make a cereal box puppet, you will need: 1 single-portion cereal box, paper lining removed and open end glued shut; poster paint and brushes; markers; construction paper; glue; scissors; odds and ends (feathers, pipe cleaners, bottle caps, felt scraps, etc.)
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick | February 2, 1992
The name Crown Cork & Seal Co. Inc. may not evoke the same response from consumers as McDonald's, Coca-Cola or Ford. But millions use its products every day when they zip open cans of soft drink or beer, or pop the tops off bottled drinks.Crown Cork, founded in Baltimore 100 years ago today, is one of the world's largest makers of aluminum and steel cans, turning out billions annually. It is also the leading producer of bottle caps, which were invented by the company's founder, William Painter.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | January 23, 1991
For years, the people at Baltimore's Standard Cap & Molding Co. fought a losing battle against corporate giants such as the Monsanto Co. as they scrabbled to find some way to make money producing plastic bottles.But in 1969, the company gave up on dreams of soaring into success in the booming plastic-bottle business. New managers came in while the company was in bankruptcy and decided that this time, the plastics company would remain content to think small.Very small.The newly renamed Poly-Seal Corp.
NEWS
By ROSALIE M. FALTER | October 24, 1994
Residents in the Linthicum-Ferndale area can now go on vacation and leave their pets at home with the peace of mind that they will be well cared for in their absence.Linthicum residents Sharon Kelly and Andrea Burgess have started a new business called Wags to Whiskers, a pet-sitting service that offers in-home care for your pets whether you are gone for a week's vacation or just the day.In addition to filling up the food dish, the business will take your pet for extended walks, do light grooming, administer medication and clean up behind your pet.To make your house look lived in while you are away, they also will bring in your mail and newspapers and water house plants.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | June 12, 1997
Marcel Duchamp invented "ready-made" art: By taking a bicycle wheel or a urinal and calling it art, he blurred the distinction between art and non-art and asserted that anything an artist called art therefore was art.The new show at the Folk Art Gallery is called "Assisted Ready Made" and features Andy Faith and Jean Innocenti, who recycle found objects and enhance them with additions. Faith takes a chair or a stuffed fish and adds bottle caps, fuses, screws, plastic gizmos and other stuff to create wildly active surfaces.
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