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NEWS
April 26, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's proposed 5-cent bottle tax can add up quickly. For example, five 12-packs of Diet Coke can be bought on sale for $10. Sixty cans times 5 cents equals $3. Add to that the 6 percent sales tax - 60 cents - and the total becomes $13.60. That's why I think city residents will soon find themselves buying sodas and alcohol in the county. Dave Edington
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NEWS
August 2, 2014
Your story about the closure of the last Stop Shop Save grocery stores in Baltimore is yet another sad example of why the city should move to repeal the bottle tax ( "Stop Shop Save to close remaining Baltimore locations," July 22). The bottle tax is hurting independent grocery stores like Stop Shop Save. This legislation, which exists nowhere else in the country, has made it nearly impossible for city-based grocers to compete with stores across the county line that don't have to pay the tax. The beverage container tax was increased on July 1, 2013, by 3 cents for every bottle and can of water, iced tea, soft drinks and juices.
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NEWS
June 17, 2012
Regarding the bottle tax proposal ("Bottle tax rise gains in council" June 12): I grew up in New York State, where a five-cent tax on bottles has been on the books for at least 15 years. Nobody even thinks twice about it there; the tax is simply a small amount of money raised for a purpose that benefits everyone. I can't recall hearing anyone consider moving to Pennsylvania in order to avoid paying an extra 60 cents for a 12-pack of Pepsi. It's simply not that big a deal. Here in Baltimore, we have Councilman Warren Branch, who said of the bottle tax, "Instead of luring 10,000 people to the city, we're going to lose 10,000 people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
New advances in wine technology are great news for people who thrive on variety and experimentation. With more Baltimore-area restaurants adopting an array of advanced wine-dispensing systems - from kegs to devices that allow wine to be poured without removing the cork - it's easier than ever to imbibe without committing to a single bottle. These new systems have a cool factor that makes wine geeks go nuts. But the technology is for more than just show. Implementing these systems translates into more options for customers, cost savings for restaurant owners and environmental benefits for everyone.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
A four-cent tax on bottled beverages that could have prevented scores of city workers from losing their jobs was defeated Thursday at an emergency meeting of the Baltimore City Council. Without the tax — the centerpiece of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's package of new fees and tariffs to help bridge the city's $121 million budget gap — the city plans to scale back street cleaning, graffiti removal and maintenance of vacant properties, among other services. Supporters hold out the slim hope of resurrecting the measure before June 30, the deadline for officials to settle the city's budget for the coming fiscal year.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 29, 2012
A 16-year-old boy has been charged in connection with the explosion of two improvised bottle bombs in an Aberdeen Dumpster, according to state fire marshals. Aberdeen city police originally responded to the first block of East Bel Air Avenue for a calls of "shots fired" shortly after 10 p.m. Thursday, according to a notice of investigation from the State Fire Marshal's Office. Police discovered two explosive devices – bottle bombs – inside a commercial Dumpster at the Magnolia Apartments, according to the notice.
NEWS
June 15, 2012
The Sun is correct in saying that the city's bottle tax increase is "no cause for great celebration" and that residents already "suffer disproportionately from poverty and high taxes" ("Beyond the bottle tax," June 13). Yet in the same breath you applaud the City Council's decision to pass the tax, saying it has the potential to transform our schools and city into a beacon of hope that will attract thousands of families. To the contrary, the current beverage tax has failed the city, fallen woefully short, cost good jobs and hurt local grocery stores.
NEWS
January 22, 2013
I think the real reason the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Beverage Association is against the "Recycle for Real" bill is because it will create more work for beverage retailers and the beverage distributors ("Drink deposit fight brewing," Jan. 15). They may even have to add employees to handle the work. I do not think an added nickel, that a purchaser will get back, will deter anyone from buying a bottled or canned beverage. It will make everyone more thoughtful before throwing out a bottle or can because then it is worth something.
FEATURES
By Megan Isennock | April 3, 2012
One of the first conversations my fiancé and I had after the spastic, electric dust settled from our engagement was about our registry. I am a slob, wannabe chef and part magpie, so getting presents to help me organize, cook and fulfill my need to see sparkly stuff seemed awesome. It didn't occur to me at first that we wouldn't register -- until Rob (my fiancé) suggested something radical. No gifts. Just wine. We're moving into a new home and hope to build a wine cellar in the stone basement.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Will consumers pay $20 for a reusable glass drinking bottle? Walt Himelstein thinks so. The Owings Mills environmental chemist and entrepreneur invented the Pure reusable glass drinking bottle, which features a shock-absorbing plastic sleeve that holds the glass together if it breaks. Himelstein, 59, hopes to tap a surging interest among environmentally conscious consumers who want their own reusable bottles, rather than buying beverages in single-use glass, metal or plastic containers.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
Authorities have arrested a second suspect believed to be connected to a series of "bottle bomb" incidents at movie theaters in the Baltimore and Washington metro areas in recent weeks. Michael Sean Hollingsworth, 23, of Takoma Park, was charged Friday with two felony counts of manufacturing and conspiracy to manufacture a destructive device in connection with a May 24th incident at the Magic Johnson Theatres in Largo. He is being held without bail and did not have an attorney listed in court records.
NEWS
Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Anne Arundel County Fire Department investigators say they have placed criminal charges related to an Arundel movie theater "bottle bombing" incident in March against a man being held in Prince George's County on similar charges in a Largo incident. Manuel Joyner-Bell Jr., 20, of Bowie has been charged with one felony count of use or manufacture of a destructive device and one misdemeanor count of reckless endangerment in relation to the March 8 bottle bombing at the Cinemark Egyptian 24 Theatre at Arundel Mills Mall.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
A 20-year-old Bowie man accused in a movie theater "bottle bomb" incident in Prince George's County is also a suspect in other similar incidents across the region, inclduing a March incident in Anne Arundel County, law enforcement authorities said. Manuel Joyner-Bell is being held at the Prince George's County Department of Corrections on a no bond status, and is facing a detonation of a destructive device charge in connection with a bottle bomb explosion at the Magic Johnson Theater in Largo on May 24. No one was injured.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
A 20-year-old Bowie man has been arrested and charged with the May 24 detonation of a "bottle-bomb" at a Prince George's County movie theater. Authorities are investigating whether he is responsible for other detonations around the region including one at Arundel Mills mall. Manuel Joyner was arrested May 31 and charged with manufacture/possession/detonation of a destructive device, a felony that carries a maximum penalty of 25 years in prison. The arrest was made by officials from the Prince George's County Office of the Fire Marshal (Fire/EMS Department)
NEWS
By Jim Joyner, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Anne Arundel County police are seeking a "person of interest" in the incident that occurred Saturday at Arundel Mills Mall in which someone set off fireworks inside the Cinemark Movie Theater. Police say someone ignited an unknown substance inside of a bottle at a screening of the movie "300: Rise of An Empire. " On Monday, police released photos of a person of interest in the case, and asked that anyone able to identify the person - or anyone with information regarding the case - contact Detective Marc Aguiar at 410-222-6155.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
A second vendor has filed a lawsuit against Santoni's Supermarket, a Highlandtown institution that said earlier this week it will be forced to close because of Baltimore's bottled-beverage tax. G. Cefalu & Bro. Inc., a 100-year-old fruit and vegetable vendor based in Jessup, said in court documents filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that the company delivered $203,198 worth of produce to Santoni's from June 1 to Sept. 23, all of which remains unpaid. The East Lombard Street grocer, founded in the early 1930s and which at one time had as many as a dozen locations, said Sunday that it will be forced to close at the end of the month.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Children in Baltimore County have recently been leaving dangerous homemade "bottle bombs" in mailboxes, on people's lawns and in other outdoor areas around the county, according to Baltimore County police. "They do it as a prank," said Lt. Rob McCullough, a police spokesman, "but once again, it's dangerous. " The so-called bombs are plastic bottles filled with a chemical drain cleaner, a piece of aluminum foil and a little bit of water - three ingredients that, when mixed, cause a gas reaction that fills the bottle until it explodes.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 14, 2012
Sometimes less is more, more or less. Sometimes, less is all you have and all you have will do just fine. Sometimes, the small things, the short things, the bits and pieces are worth keeping because they might be one day useful; my father felt that way about stove bolts. Walter Hard, a Vermont folk poet of Robert Frost's generation, once told of the frugal Yankee woman - was there any other kind? - who left a bag in her attic labeled, "Pieces of string too short to use. " So, alrighty then, that's my preamble and I'm going with it. Here, forthwith, are pieces of column too short to use ... • Suggestion for the Baltimore merchants who oppose Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's proposal to increase the city's bottle tax to five cents to pay for school renovations: Turn what you see as a problem into an opportunity.
NEWS
October 16, 2013
I am no economist but I fail to see why the bottle tax has been so disastrous to Santoni's Supermarket in Highlandtown while apparently sparing other city markets ( "Santoni's closing Highlandtown store," Oct. 13). (Make no mistake: My mobile friends loved Santoni's. Being on the less mobile side, I walk to Fresh and Green's when I need produce.) I have to ask if it could it possibly be that Santoni's has been charging more than its competitors for sodas and other items, leaving Mrs. Raven and Miss Oriole to load up on Santoni's hand-butchered meat and great pies and then, on the way home, swing by Safeway to fill up the car trunk with 7Up, Pepsi and the like - all on sale or cheaper, tax or no tax. And, yes, I am cynical, but did Santoni's lose money by giving transportation to low-income residents of city "food deserts" who wanted to peruse his expensive soda stocks?
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Facing criticism from a struggling local business, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake defended the city's bottle tax Tuesday as essential to rebuilding Baltimore's schools. But the mayor acknowledged she would have to suspend a program that delivers fresh produce to poor neighborhoods because of the closing of the supermarket, Santoni's. Santoni's, an 83-year-old Highlandtown grocer, announced this week it would close its doors at the end of this month solely because of the city's bottled-beverage tax. Rob Santoni Jr., the company's chief financial officer, said he is in talks to bring in another supermarket and plans to run for a House of Delegates seat in Baltimore County to give small businesses a stronger voice in Annapolis.
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