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Botswana

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Janell Sutherland, For The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
This week, "The Amazing Race" gives us bushmen and scorpions in Africa, which is just what we all needed, right? The first clue tells teams that they must go to the city of Maun in the Kalahari desert. They have to find out what country they're headed for before a security guard will let them into a travel agency to buy tickets.  He has one job, let him do it! The travel agency is a small place and the doors are plate glass. Basically, people on the outside can see and hear people on the inside.  The Fearless Friends check a hotel computer and discover that they are headed to Botswana.
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NEWS
Kelly Virginia Phelan | May 13, 2014
In light of the recent kidnapping of nearly 300 Nigerian schoolgirls and the worldwide call to #BringBackOurGirls, it is important to note that the difficulties facing young females in Sub-Saharan Africa extend far beyond this tragedy. Last week Jean Waller Brune, the Head of Roland Park Country School, wrote a moving piece about the challenges of girls' education around the globe ("Bring back our girls," May 8). I am a proud alumna of RPCS and remember Mrs. Brune fondly. Her words affected me profoundly, now more than ever, as I am a resident of Africa and witness these types of atrocities daily.
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NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 1997
ONE HUNDRED AND sixty members of Grace Bible Church in Manchester caught a glimpse of the life of missionaries in Botswana and France Sunday evening.Bob and Esther Genheimer serve in Botswana, and Steve and Beth Coffey serve in France. The couples gave language lessons and short talks about life in two countries on two diverse continents. Botswana is in southern Africa.The experience became a theatrical treat. Church members turned the gymnasium into an African restaurant, a French cafe and a rural Botswana home.
NEWS
By Kelly Virginia Phelan | December 11, 2013
Africa is a continent, not a country. However, most of the world refers to Africa as one collective, with little attention paid toward borders; a practice most Africans resent. And it has never been quite as prevalent as in the last few days since Nelson Mandela's passing. I am an American citizen who is a resident of Botswana. I travel extensively throughout Africa and routinely meet all nationalities and classes of Africans. I witness firsthand the resentment toward uninformed Westerners and foreign media who make generalizations about the continent based on a single data point.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 1998
GABORONE, Botswana -- President Clinton traveled yesterday from Africa's youngest democracy to its oldest, where he praised the government and people of Botswana as a model for the rest of the continent for 30 years."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 10, 1991
MAUN, Botswana -- The Boro River is a narrow thread of blue twisting languidly through the lower reaches of the great Okavango swamps. Golden reed shafts arch over its shallow banks as white waterlilies bob in the radiant sun."Doesn't look big enough to stir up so much trouble, does it?" asked Isaac Tudor, an adviser to the chief of the BaTawana tribe.It doesn't take much water to start trouble in a country dominated by the world's fourth-largest desert, the Kalahari. A population of 1.3 million -- smaller than Philadelphia's -- is spread across an arid landscape the size of France.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2000
An 11-year-old Baltimore County boy who was on safari in Botswana was killed Tuesday by a hyena that attacked him inside his tent, a U.S. State Department official said yesterday. Mark Garrity Shea of Brooklandville was traveling with his mother on their second visit to Botswana in two years when the attack occurred, said the official, who had few specifics about the incident. The boy, who was known as Garrit to his classmates, was a pupil at Fort Garrison Elementary School in Baltimore County.
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,Los Angeles Times | March 15, 2009
People always ask me how I decide where to go. I read, I see movies, I stare at maps, I dream. In doing so, I arrived at these 10 places that are tops on my list for 2009. Some are old favorites that are newly affordable. Others have a particular reason to shine this year or suddenly are being talked about by well-traveled people I know. A few are raw, off-the-beaten-track destinations that I doubt can long remain untransformed by globalization. Money's tight, so I know I won't get to them all. But tough times have forced travel providers to reduce prices, meaning that now might be the time to take the grand tour.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 11, 2003
GABORONE, Botswana - President Bush visited Botswana yesterday to promote his proposals to help Africa fight AIDS and overcome poverty, saying he wants the world to know "that we're not only a powerful nation, we're also a compassionate nation." But his visit coincided with action by Congress to trim the budgets for the two main proposals he highlighted here, a plan to increase aid to countries that make demonstrable progress toward democracy and free markets and a program to send $15 billion to some of the world's poorest nations over the next five years to combat AIDS.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 27, 1998
HARARE, Zimbabwe -- Former Zimbabwean President Canaan Banana was convicted yesterday on 11 counts of sodomy, attempted sodomy and indecent assault by Zimbabwe's highest court, and prosecutors confirmed he has fled the country.In the most sensational trial involving homosexuality in modern African history, High Court Judge Godfrey Chidyausiku confiscated Banana's bail and issued an arrest warrant for the 63-year-old father of four and Methodist theologian.Banana went to neighboring Botswana on Nov. 17."
ENTERTAINMENT
Janell Sutherland, For The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
This week, "The Amazing Race" gives us bushmen and scorpions in Africa, which is just what we all needed, right? The first clue tells teams that they must go to the city of Maun in the Kalahari desert. They have to find out what country they're headed for before a security guard will let them into a travel agency to buy tickets.  He has one job, let him do it! The travel agency is a small place and the doors are plate glass. Basically, people on the outside can see and hear people on the inside.  The Fearless Friends check a hotel computer and discover that they are headed to Botswana.
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,Los Angeles Times | March 15, 2009
People always ask me how I decide where to go. I read, I see movies, I stare at maps, I dream. In doing so, I arrived at these 10 places that are tops on my list for 2009. Some are old favorites that are newly affordable. Others have a particular reason to shine this year or suddenly are being talked about by well-traveled people I know. A few are raw, off-the-beaten-track destinations that I doubt can long remain untransformed by globalization. Money's tight, so I know I won't get to them all. But tough times have forced travel providers to reduce prices, meaning that now might be the time to take the grand tour.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 2006
ACCRA, GHANA -- In a landmark decision, the Botswana High Court ruled yesterday that the government had acted illegally when it forcibly evicted the last tribal Bushmen living a traditional life from the Central Kalahari Game Reserve. The last 2,000 Bushmen living in the game reserve were forced out in 1997 and 2002, but yesterday's verdict centered on the latter eviction of about 1,000 people. The court - in the town of Lobatse, about 37 miles south of the capital Gaborone - ruled 2-1 in favor of the Bushmen, also finding that they had a right to hunt and gather in the reserve.
NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | October 7, 2005
DUKWI, Botswana -- Beyond the open barbed-wire gate, a boulevard of sand leads to this cul-de-sac of dust, home to 3,000 people who fled conflicts in central and southern Africa that the world scarcely noticed or long ago forgot. The Somalis, Congolese, Zimbabweans, Ugandans and citizens of a dozen other African nations living in Botswana's Dukwi refugee camp cannot, or will not, return to their original homes. The camp - six square miles of dry scrubland in northeast Botswana - is where their days blur together into one long, hot wait.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 2004
"People have really embraced fair trade," said Becky Collins behind the counter of her shop, just a stone's throw from the Susquehanna River at 308 St. John St. in Havre de Grace. The shop is called Doodads Inc. Inside are two floors of items from around the world. The store promotes fair trade with local and international artisans. The shop opened in May last year. Because items are not mass-produced, what you see on one day may not be there the next. Collins has a knack for acquiring more items through fair/alternative trade organizations such as SERRV, Sales Exchange for Refugee Rehabilitation Vocations International.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | May 9, 2004
A Memorable Place Elephants teach lessons about family By John Murrow SPECIAL TO THE SUN Africa is a place where human beings take a back seat and hold on for a trip that they will never forget. I know my family and I never will forget our experience there last summer. My grandmother took my family and me to South Africa, Botswana and Zimbabwe. The Africa we came to know, love and respect was filled with wilderness, culture and wildlife. We spent the majority of the trip in Botswana.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 2006
ACCRA, GHANA -- In a landmark decision, the Botswana High Court ruled yesterday that the government had acted illegally when it forcibly evicted the last tribal Bushmen living a traditional life from the Central Kalahari Game Reserve. The last 2,000 Bushmen living in the game reserve were forced out in 1997 and 2002, but yesterday's verdict centered on the latter eviction of about 1,000 people. The court - in the town of Lobatse, about 37 miles south of the capital Gaborone - ruled 2-1 in favor of the Bushmen, also finding that they had a right to hunt and gather in the reserve.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 25, 2003
MATSILOJE, Botswana - Residents of this village along the border with Zimbabwe were quite pleased when Botswana's government began erecting a 10-foot-high electrified fence to separate the two countries. Officially, the fence is to keep out livestock from Zimbabwe suspected of carrying foot-and-mouth disease. But the villagers are hoping the fence, which will snake across 300 miles of desert scrub, will do more: block the path of thousands of illegal immigrants who are fleeing the political and economic turmoil in Zimbabwe.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 11, 2003
GABORONE, Botswana - President Bush visited Botswana yesterday to promote his proposals to help Africa fight AIDS and overcome poverty, saying he wants the world to know "that we're not only a powerful nation, we're also a compassionate nation." But his visit coincided with action by Congress to trim the budgets for the two main proposals he highlighted here, a plan to increase aid to countries that make demonstrable progress toward democracy and free markets and a program to send $15 billion to some of the world's poorest nations over the next five years to combat AIDS.
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