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By Special to The Sun | March 18, 1995
MINNEAPOLIS -- Beth Botsford finished second in the 100-meter backstroke yesterday, as the North Baltimore Aquatic Club women's team took an 11-point lead over the Bolles School of Jacksonville, Fla., into the final day of competition at the Phillips 66 National Swimming Championships.Botsford finished in 1 minute, 3.32 seconds.Whitney Phelps of NBAC was ninth in the 100-meter butterfly in 1:02.42, and Kelly McPherson was 11th in the 400-meter freestyle in 4:19.88.NBAC's women's 800-meter freestyle relay team of Melinda Rehm, Phelps, Whitney Metzler and McPherson was second in 8:25.
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Sports Digest | September 11, 2014
Maryland State Athletic Hall of Fame Native Dancer, five others to be inducted in November Racehorse Native Dancer, swimmer Beth Botsford , baseball-football players Tommy Brown and Brian Jordan , lacrosse player and coach Bob Scott and figure skater Kimmie Meissner will be inducted into the Maryland State Athletic Hall of Fame on Nov. 13 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie. In addition, the Hall will present the John Steadman Lifetime Achievement Award, which recognizes the contribution of individuals over a long career of supporting and advancing athletics in the state of Maryland, to the late Earl Banks , who was the football coach at Morgan State.
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1995
ATLANTA -- When Beth Botsford emerged from the pool yesterday morning here at the Georgia Tech Aquatics Center, she wore a pained expression on her face. She had just looked at the results of her heat in the women's 200-meter backstroke of the Pan Pacific Championships.Botsford, the 14-year-old from Baltimore whose back-to-back national championships this year had made her a candidate for the 1996 U.S. Olympic team, met disappointment head-on in her first major international competition. She was crushed, both by a strong field and by her own performance.
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By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2004
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Beth Botsford isn't offended when the question is posed, often indelicately. She has heard it dozens of times and wants to answer it with a gold medal around her neck and a bunch of adolescent girls at her feet. Botsford, a Timonium native, won the 100-meter backstroke at the 1996 Olympics. She was a few months past her 15th birthday. At the 2000 Olympic trials, Botsford finished eighth in that event. She'll face an uphill struggle to get into the top five at this year's trials, which will be held in July, which leads to the question: Why does she persist with the spartan life?
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By Doug Brown | March 16, 1995
The North Baltimore Aquatic Club's Beth Botsford won the 200-meter backstroke in the Phillips 66 National Swimming Championships last night in Minneapolis.Botsford, 13, a Garrison Forest School eighth grader, broke the national 13-14 age group record in winning the event in 2 minutes, 13.53 seconds. Botsford will also swim in the 100 backstroke, 100 butterly and 200 individual medley in the five-day meet that ends Saturday."This wasn't that much of a surprise, because Beth had done a 2:16 last year," said NBAC coach Murray Stephens, whose team is defending its national women's title.
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By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1997
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- A year after her Olympics triumph, Baltimore's Beth Botsford has a new goal.Botsford will compete for a berth on the U.S. team that will go to the World Championships in Perth, Australia, in January during the Phillips 66 National Swimming Championships that begin a seven-day run here today.Botsford, who captured the 100-meter backstroke in the Atlanta Olympics and swam the backstroke leg on the winning U.S. 400 medley relay team, needs a first or second in the 100 or 200 backstroke, her specialties, to make the U.S. team.
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By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1996
It was like 1984 all over again. It was like Theresa Andrews revisited.Same event. Same coach. Same seeding for the final. Same nationality of the top two seeds -- both Americans. Same upset.In the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, Andrews, coached by Murray Stephens of the North Baltimore Aquatic Club, won the 100-meter backstroke after qualifying second for the final behind Betsy Mitchell.Twelve years later, NBAC's Beth Botsford, coached by Stephens, won the 100 backstroke last night in Atlanta after qualifying second behind Whitney Hedgepeth.
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By KEN ROSENTHAL | July 23, 1996
ATLANTA -- Not that Beth Botsford is young or anything, but how many Olympic gold medalists spend their post-race interview denying they collect Sesame Street dolls?"
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1996
INDIANAPOLIS -- Baltimore 14-year-old Beth Botsford hit the big time last night. She was surrounded by television cameras as she loosened up for the final heat in the 200-meter backstroke. She was right there in the glare of the national spotlight, getting a taste of the kind of intrusive media attention she will face when she gets to Atlanta in July.And she responded like a champion, racing to a phenomenal time on her way to a victory that elevated her into the world's elite in her event.
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By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2000
INDIANAPOLIS - The local flavor on the U.S. Olympic swim team might extend beyond Michael Phelps. Two collegians with roots in Baltimore will swim finals tonight at the U.S. trials. Beth Botsford, a gold medalist in 1996, has to pick up the pace to qualify in the women's 200-meter backstroke, while Tommy Hannan will have the fourth seed in the men's 100 butterfly. Hannan had the third-fastest time of the day at the Indiana University Natatorium, as he lowered his personal best to 53.43 seconds in the morning's preliminaries.
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By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2000
INDIANAPOLIS - Lenny Krayzelburg told him to go to bed. Michael Phelps told him to go for it. Tommy Hannan turned a late night into the performance of his career, as the 20-year-old out of Mount St. Joseph High School and the Eagle Swim Team delivered one of the more amazing breakthroughs at the U.S. trials for the Olympic Games with a second place in the 100-meter butterfly last night. Hannan is headed to Sydney, Australia, as a member of the U.S. team. Four years ago, when he briefly contemplated quitting the sport, the only way it appeared he would ever get Down Under was to visit an uncle who lives in the Olympic city.
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By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2000
INDIANAPOLIS - The local flavor on the U.S. Olympic swim team might extend beyond Michael Phelps. Two collegians with roots in Baltimore will swim finals tonight at the U.S. trials. Beth Botsford, a gold medalist in 1996, has to pick up the pace to qualify in the women's 200-meter backstroke, while Tommy Hannan will have the fourth seed in the men's 100 butterfly. Hannan had the third-fastest time of the day at the Indiana University Natatorium, as he lowered his personal best to 53.43 seconds in the morning's preliminaries.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2000
INDIANAPOLIS - If Beth Botsford makes another Olympic swim team tomorrow night, she'll be ecstatic. If she doesn't, she'll still be a happy sophomore at the University of Arizona, a teen-ager whose idea of an escape is a long Sunday drive into the Santa Catalina Mountains in search of a good piece of pie. "I'm a sucker for the sun," Botsford said. "It's never cold in Tucson; it never rains. I could live out there and be a happy girl all my life. This is the most fun I've had in years."
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By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2000
INDIANAPOLIS - How I Spent My Summer Vacation. If Michael Phelps has to deliver that essay late at Towson High, at least he'll know it has grade-A content. Two months past his 15th birthday, Phelps is one more solid race away from a historic berth on the U.S. Olympic swim team. The most recent phenom to come out of the North Baltimore Aquatic Club, Phelps handled the first two rounds of the 200-meter butterfly with aplomb yesterday, and will work tonight's final from Lane 5 as the second seed.
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By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2000
INDIANAPOLIS -- It was a good night for geezers at the U.S. swim trials. Dara Torres, 33, will be the first American to swim in four Olympics, thanks to her second-place finish in the 100-meter butterfly. Jenny Thompson, 27, won that race over her club teammate at Stanford Swimming, and earned a berth on her third straight U.S. team. Tom Dolan is only 24, but the man who feels he is the best all-around swimmer in the world felt more like 104 on Monday, when he was running a 102-degree fever and being sustained by antibiotics.
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By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2000
Mark Teixeira is probably the best amateur baseball player in the United States. While Georgia Tech fell two wins short of the College World Series, he was still in Omaha yesterday, accepting the latest of his national Player of the Year awards. He just completed his sophomore season, so Teixeira could be the No. 1 selection in the 2001 draft. In the past, a player of his talent would have been a shoo-in for U.S. Olympic teams, but Teixeira sounds prepared to spend September in Atlanta instead of Sydney, Australia.
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By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1997
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- It comes down to this for Beth Botsford: She needs to strengthen her shoulders.The North Baltimore Aquatic Club star came up short in the 200-meter backstroke in the Phillips 66 National Swimming Championships last night, finishing fourth because she slowed in the last 100 as a result of shoulder soreness stretching back to early summer."
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